Michael Lynagh’s marathon mission

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Marathon effort: Michael Lynagh (centre) with other members of Team Sky for Stroke, who aim to raise £80kBy Sarah MockfordMICHAEL LYNAGH is going to run the London Marathon on Sunday 21 April – almost a year to the day that he suffered a near-fatal stroke.Look at the 1991 World Cup-winning Wallaby fly-half now and there are no outward signs of the trauma he suffered in Australia last April; he’s made a remarkable recovery, although he has lost nearly half the sight in his left eye.Lynagh realises how fortunate he is and, having met fellow stroke survivors, he decided he wanted to give something back, which is where a Sky Sports colleague stepped in.Wallaby wonder: Michael LynaghJames Gemmell, one of Sky’s rugby presenters, told Lynagh he wanted to run the London Marathon for the Stroke Association and rather than simply give him a pat on the back, 49-year-old Lynagh decided to join his antipodean workmate. You can sponsor Lynagh and his team by visiting justgiving.com/teamskyforstrokeHe may have won the 1991 World Cup with Australia but this is set to be Lynagh’s biggest challenge yet – and it is certainly an inspiring one. As he says: “I look forward to making a difference.”center_img Since then the whole thing has spiralled and now Team Sky for Stroke, an eight-strong squad including Scotland’s interim forwards coach Dean Ryan and former Ireland wing Tyrone Howe, will be pounding London’s streets in April to raise money for the charity.Lynagh has earmarked a specific project for the funds raised by his team’s efforts, too. He wants to focus on the Stroke Association’s ‘Back to Work’ scheme, helping survivors to return to work after their strokes.“I see myself as one of the lucky ones being able to go back to work,” he says. “Not all stroke survivors get that chance and by supporting the Stroke Association, I’m excited to try and help change that.”last_img read more

RBS 6 Nations: Round Five Talking Points

first_imgIn truth, both of these sides are still trying to change and move forward. Gradually. Be it from eight losses in a row and a dastardly World Cup draw, or an unexpected upturn in fortunes.Of course little tweaks may mean an interesting long-term turn, but in this moment, with this pressure, the perspiration and the title, well, it could all come down to a brutal crescendo. While tearing into each other, the players who keep their heads, will win. He and Rob Howley have publicly spoken of why he does not want the pressure of captaincy when he could just focus on his game. When he is focussed on his game, mind you, others tend to be familiarised with the dirt and relieved of their ball, so it is no surprise that both player and coach want to let him the game and see if he can accommodate fellow openside Justin Tipuric.However, the young man has just been named brand ambassador with Thomas Pink, the official tailor for the British and Irish Lions. If this is as well thought through, as we would assume, the no-captaincy thing might pay off for this summer, too.Lame ducks no moreEngland put in a less-than-inspiring performance against Italy last round and will have spent a week being told just that. The changes have come in as they opted for Ben Youngs, Joe Marler and Tom Croft, making sure that smart tactics and consistency trumps the ballast and derring-do of Danny Care, Mako Vunipola and James Haskell.Shouting out: the abrasive Marler has earned a recallReturning is also Owen Farrell, hoping to pull England into shape and get back to the momentum-generating rhythm that has seen England improve of late. The question is, can these changes and tactical moves ensure that they can punch through the home side, who will look to smother England? If they do England are hard to shackle.Building to the World CupPutting aside the fact that these two have each other in World Cup 2015 – mainly because it is years away – Stuart Lancaster has suggested that winning the Six Nations would be a huge boost for a growing side. He told Press Association: “Both sides have got the chance to win the championship, so effectively it’s a shootout. In that sense to go to Cardiff and try and win a Grand Slam is a great test.”He mentions test, shootout and winning the tournament, but only trying for the Grand Slam. It is a phrase he may have put in his mouth a lot, but he will not be looking too far ahead. during the England training session held at Pennyhill Park on March 12, 2013 in Bagshot, England. Aye aye, skipper: Former captain Sam Warburton shares a smile with Saturday’s leader, Gethin JenkinsBy Alan DymockTHE SIX Nations is roaring into the last weekend of action after lurching past week one and it is now nearly impossible to keep pace with the competition. The BBC, however, will be missing a trick if it is John Inverdale leading proceedings on Super Sexy Sensational Saturday.It should be David Attenborough in front of the cameras in a cacophonous Cardiff.There will be plenty of wildlife, a bloody battle at the top the food chain and perhaps some surprising mating rituals near the watering holes of the principality capital. Throw in some soaring balls, beastly scrums and possibly even a rare swandive and it is hard to suggest a more compelling frenzy anywhere else on the planet.So what could be spotted on this safari of smacks?Out front: Alun Wyn Jones leading the way against ScotlandThe Lesser-spotted CaptainForget Ospreys leader Alun Wyn Jones or the wounded Ryan Jones. Forget the resurgent Sam Warburton. Galloping into the frame for captain of Wales this weekend is Gethin Jenkins.Jenkins has enjoyed migrating back to Wales for the championship and has grown in stature the longer he has been in camp. There were doubts about his fitness and mindset after spending most of this domestic season waiting in the wings for Andrew Sheridan in Toulon. However, he has played steadily and reliably in the Welsh front row.He still has points to prove in order to be assured of a Lions spot this summer and a few are baffled by ‘Melon’ being handed the arm band, but he will keep doing what he’s been doing 97 times previously. There is so much balance and so many other leaders elsewhere.The pink-breasted Lion?Last week Warburton put in a Man of the Match performance as he careered into the Scottish breakdown. He scavenged and smashed, picking off the weaker one-out runners that the Scots offered up. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

Aviva Premiership: Round 1 wrap

first_img Moving on up: George Pisi points his pals to the top of the table after Saints ran riot in Round 1 of the PremiershipBy Alan DymockWEEK ONE in the new Aviva Premiership season splashed onto our screens at the weekend before crunching away, stepping over the debris from what was a tough first assignment.Everything began in Newcastle on Friday night under conditions that would have seen Poseidon fashioning a poncho out of a bin bag. It was the grand reintroduction of Falcons into the Premiership environment, and no doubt they are used to horizontal rain and skies the colour of bitumen soup, but they struggled, losing to Bath 21-0.Slippery when wet: Hits fly in during Falcons v BathA try for Anthony Perenise and a penalty try for Bath’s surging pack were the only dots of the contest, but new stand-off George Ford also put on an calm and accurate kicking display in wet and wild conditions.Newcastle on the other hand, looked bereft of ideas in attack and will need to offer a lot more as they make their first trip away to Sale next week.Saturday saw the return of the Twickenham double-header, as London Irish lost 20-42 to an efficient, rumbling Saracens – a brace from Sarries hooker Jamie George and elusive running from Irish’s Marland Yarde were the highlights of the game – before London Wasps and Harlequins wrestled like two oily sumos. There was intent and dropped balls throughout, a dangerous combination at the best of times, but two Wasps tries to one Quins try belied the score card. Nick Evans was not in the best form with the boot but did enough to keep Quins in front until the tense last minute where Andy Goode had a touchline conversion to win it.Needless to say the Twickenham posts are not in Goode’s good books as the upright robbed Wasps of a winner, but 62,000 fans were happy for the nail-biting finish. during the Aviva Premiership match between Leicester Tigers and Worcester Warriors at Welford Road on September 8, 2013 in Leicester, England. The Warriors never gave up the fight, as you would expect from a Dean Ryan-led side, but tries from David Mele, Adam Thompstone, Jordan Crane and a swerving, long-range bonus-point score from Niki Goneva was enough to ensure the champions were where they like to be: near the top of the table.What will week two bring? A miracle? A 0-0? A volcanic eruption? Who knows, but at least it’s back. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sale Sharks were the surprise package of the day, turning over Gloucester at Kingsholm , 22-16, pulling ahead through perpetual-try-scorer Mark Cueto and then maintaining their advantage with a dot from centre Andy Forsyth. Henry Trinder snatched up a Tavis Knoyle offload before racing through for his own try and Freddie Burns kept dissecting the posts with his kicks, but they never had enough to see off the Sharks.Keeping them busy: Niki Goneva was in the mood on SundayIf ever there was a team that signaled their intent for the year in one game, though, it was Saints. Northampton started with George North and Alex Corbisiero on the pitch and Samu Manoa and Kahn Fotuali’i on the bench for their game against Exeter Chiefs, a show of just how much muscle they had. It paid off, too, as they raced to a 31-6 half-time lead.The big players stood up, too, with the Pisi brothers, Dylan Hartley, Tom Wood and Manoa all scoring. Exeter’s leader Dean Mumm scored one of his own, but the visitors never really landed a punch.Then, on Sunday, champions Leicester Tigers hosted Worcester Warriors.last_img read more

The contenders for Rugby Book of the Year

first_img Top six: the books shortlisted for Rugby Book of the Year, to be announced in June (Alan Pearey) RUGBY BOOK OF THE YEAR WINNERS2008 Ripley’s World – Andy Ripley (Mainstream)2009 Seeing Red: Twelve Tumultuous Years in Welsh Rugby – Alun Carter and Nick Bishop (Mainstream)2010 Confessions of a Rugby Mercenary – John Daniell (Ebury Press)2011 The Grudge – Tom English (Yellow Jersey)2012 Higgy – Alastair Hignell (Bloomsbury)2013 The Final Whistle: The Great War in Fifteen Players – Stephen Cooper (History Press)2014 City Centre – Simon Halliday (Matador)2015 Beyond The Horizon – Richard Parks (Sphere)2016 No Borders: Playing Rugby for Ireland – Tom English (Arena Sport)2017 The Battle – Paul O’Connell (Penguin Ireland)2018 Wrecking Ball – Billy Vunipola (Headline)Sevens Heaven, by Ben Ryan, published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £20Ben Ryan’s enthralling snapshot of life with Fiji Sevens came out about a year ago and ironically he was on stage at Lord’s to present the 2018 rugby prize, little knowing that his own book would be nominated this year.The Londoner took charge of the flamboyant Fijians in 2013, shortly after his tenure as England Sevens coach fizzled out disappointingly, and the “three years of enlightenment” that followed in the South Pacific is brought to print with the help of the estimable BBC writer Tom Fordyce.Ryan sheds light on the traditional ways and customs of Fijian life – many of them an impediment to a professional sports environment – and his patience and good sense brings a measure of structure to the chaotic brilliance around him.The result is back-to-back World Series titles and a gold medal in the 2016 Rio Olympics – Fiji’s first Olympic medal of any kind.Interestingly, Ryan delves too into more personal areas of his life, including an agonizing search for a long-lost childhood friend. It’s a book that ticks an awful lot of boxes.The Jersey, by Peter Bills, published by Macmillan, £25Why are the All Blacks, hailing from a nation of fewer than 5m people, so damn good at rugby? Year after year after year.It’s a question Peter Bills wanted to answer and after spending five months travelling round New Zealand, he certainly came up some answers. His splendidly comprehensive examination of the subject starts with the pioneering spirit of the first European settlers in 1839 and takes us right up to the barefoot Beauden Barrett and the team-driven environment currently overseen by Steve Hansen.Some of the reasons given for New Zealand’s global dominance will be familiar to the reader – such as central contracts, coaching standards, and the heavy emphasis on basic skills and attacking intent that pervades every level of the game there.Yet there are many other factors thrown into the pot, with plenty of outside opinion and Bills too getting on his soapbox, happy to criticise as well as laud.The Last Amateurs, by Jonathan Bradley, published by Blackstaff, £9.99Crossing the Irish Sea, we have a terrific offering from Blackstaff Press via the hand of Belfast Telegraph rugby correspondent Jonathan Bradley.Bradley takes us back to the early days of the Heineken Cup when not everyone was fully professional and you could have fledgling full-time rugby pros waiting for part-time team-mates to finish a day’s work at the office, farm or factory floor.Ulster were in just that situation at the start of the 1998-99 season but contrived, under coach Harry Williams, to pull off the competition’s unlikeliest ever triumph.A late interception try here, a missed opposition kick there, everything seemed to fall Ulster’s way. However, they still had to dispatch some mightily impressive French sides – English clubs had boycotted the tournament – to achieve their fairytale. The contenders for Rugby Book of the YearLaunched in 2003, the annual Sports Book Awards showcase the cream of sports writing and publishing. The Best Rugby Book category came on board in 2008 and is judged by a panel of journalists from the Rugby Union Writers’ Club. Two England No 8s of different eras, Andy Ripley and Billy Vunipola, sandwich nine other winners representing outstanding rugby writing from across England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland.This year’s rugby shortlist was announced in Marylebone this week and is drawn from books published in 2018. In attendance were nominee Ian Robertson, past winner Brian Moore and Test referee Wayne Barnes, along with Mick Cleary and Gavin Mairs from the title sponsors. The awards ceremony takes place on 4 June at Lord’s. We sum up the contenders for the Heineken Rugby Book of the Year, listed in alphabetical order…Ivon, by Michael Aylwin, published by Red Door, RRP £8.99Michael Aylwin, who ghosted Richard Parks’s 2015 prize winner about the 737 Challenge, is back with surely the most imaginative book ever to feature on the rugby shortlist.His novel is a futuristic humdinger set in the 22nd century in which sinister forces have made rugby (and other sports) unrecognisable from the game we know and love today.Ivon is the hero of the story, a brilliant young outside-half taken under the wing of a legendary cricketer (Dusty Noble), who is perturbed by the society around him and starts to ask awkward questions of an increasingly nervous state.There is humour, thought-provoking conflicts – notably humanity v science – and even a sprinkling of love interest. It’s like a cross between 1984 and The Hunger Games but with rugby thrown in, and how marvellous that a book that came to fruition because of crowdfunding can jostle with the major publishers at the Sports Book Awards.My Name’5 Doddie Weir: The Autobiography, published by Black & White, £20A fitting addition to the shortlist, not least because Doddie Weir’s foundation – which has raised more than £2m for research into motor neurone disease since its launch 18 months ago – is this year’s charity partner of the Sports Book Awards.The former Scotland lock writes movingly about the chilling and incurable disease that he was diagnosed with just before Christmas 2016. Typical of this much-loved personality, he has always been more concerned of his plight’s impact on others and that comes across in a book that nevertheless oozes gentle humour throughout.Born into farming stock in the Scottish Borders in 1970, Weir went on to experience numerous high points in rugby, including a triumphant Lions tour, a Premiership title with Newcastle and a Scotland Five Nations title, all within a couple of years in the late Nineties.The book brings a first rugby shortlisting for Black & White Publishing, a decade after the back-to-back successes of another Edinburgh publisher, Mainstream (now defunct).Rugby: Talking a Good Game, by Ian Robertson, published by Hodder & Stoughton, £20Ian Robertson never played with Weir but he commentated on him many a time. Then again, whose path didn’t he cross during a near 50-year career working for BBC radio?His autobiography, expertly ghosted by Chris Hewett, is a treasure trove of anecdotes and funny stories. But it’s much more that.The ex-Scotland fly-half offers insights into many of the great broadcasters and sports personalities he encountered, from rugby coaches Ian McGeechan, Jack Rowell and Clive Woodward to media giants like Des Lynam, Peter Bromley and Bill McLaren.He reported on pretty much every major rugby event in the past five decades and his gift of the gab won him friends in high places. Which is why he got invited to lunch by Nelson Mandela, was sent Christmas cards by Elizabeth Taylor and had George Best pulling up a chair to chat to him in a Canberra hotel. The shortlists for the Telegraph Sports Book Awards were announced this week. Rugby World looks at the six contenders for the Heineken Rugby Book of the Year prizecenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Canadian council recommends ‘continued monitoring’ of covenant

first_imgCanadian council recommends ‘continued monitoring’ of covenant Press Release Service Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Tags Anglican Consultative Council, Anglican Communion, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK center_img Submit an Event Listing Anglican Covenant Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Featured Jobs & Calls Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate Diocese of Nebraska Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing [Anglican Journal — Mississauga, Ontario] When it meets this July, the Anglican Church of Canada’s General Synod will not be asked to either accept or reject the proposed Anglican Covenant.Instead, the governing body will consider a motion that continues the conversation and delays a final decision on the covenant until the next General Synod in 2016.The covenant is a set of principles recommended by the 2004 Windsor Report as a way of healing relationships severely damaged by divisions over human sexuality among member provinces of the Anglican Communion.At its recent spring meeting, the Council of General Synod (CoGS) agreed to recommend that General Synod ask the church’s Anglican Communion Working Group to “monitor continued developments” around the proposed covenant. It requests that the group render a report to the spring 2016 meeting of the council and directs the council “to bring a recommendation regarding the adoption of the covenant” to the next General Synod in 2016.In 2010, General Synod had approved a resolution that received the final text of the covenant, requested the working group to prepare study and consultation materials for parishes and dioceses, and requested that the faith, worship and ministry committee and the Governance Working Group provide advice on the “theological, ecclesiological, legal and constitutional implications of the decision to adopt or not adopt the covenant.” It also directed the council “to bring a recommendation regarding the adoption of the covenant” to the 2013 General Synod.Archdeacon Harry Huskins, working group member, described the 2013 motion as “a neutral vehicle” in which to deal with the covenant and is one that “recognizes the division of opinion” around the issue.Huskins asked the council, however, whether it could consider ways in which General Synod members who feel strongly for or against the covenant could have opportunities to express their opinions on the floor; “Might it be useful to take time as a committee of the whole so people can say what they want?” suggested Huskins.Some council members questioned whether the covenant issue was a “hot topic” that warranted extra time at an already compressed General Synod. Others said the working group’s report was “comprehensive enough” to explain the reasons for the motion.Earlier in the discussion, council members said that there wasn’t any appetite for such discussions, noting how copious study materials prepared by the working – as requested by the 2010 General Synod – have not sparked interest among Canadian Anglicans.“I’ve tried to begin conversations in Ottawa and its neighbouring dioceses, but there’s simply no interest. We just assume this is dead,” said Ron Chaplin, from the diocese of Ottawa.“I don’t think it’s a burning issue,” said Cynthia Haines-Turner, from the ecclesiastical province of Canada. She added that this year’s General Synod, with its compressed schedule, was better spent on “more pressing matters.” She added that the covenant was a “fairly weighty issue,” and members shouldn’t have to be rushed into a decision. “2016 is a better time.”The diocesan bishop of Calgary, Gregory Kerr-Wilson, said he supported the motion but cautioned the council about how it talks about the reception of the covenant. “Leadership means taking an interest in some things that may not be interesting to others, but which have an impact down the road,” he said.It was agreed that the General Synod planning committee would look into the matter as it finalizes the agenda. As things currently stand, discussions around the covenant have been allotted 45 minutes, said Dean Peter Wall, chair of the General Synod planning committee.Dean Peter Elliott, who was one of the church’s three representatives to the Anglican Consultative Council, which discussed the covenant last fall, noted that even the Anglican Communion is “literally over the map” with regards to action on the covenant. “The discussion within provinces and communion (about the covenant) was more highly valued than the product of approval,” said Elliott.Archbishop Fred Hiltz, primate of the Anglican Church of Canada, concurred with Elliott, saying that while some provinces have adopted the covenant, others have rejected it outright, while others have adopted it “with some caveats.”[Editors’ note: In July 2012, the Episcopal Church’s General Convention declined to take a position on the covenant, saying via Resolution B005 that, following extensive study and prayerful consideration of the Anglican Covenant, there remains “a wide variety of opinions and ecclesiological positions in The Episcopal Church.” The resolution called for the presiding bishop and the president of the House of Deputies to appoint a task force “to continue to monitor the ongoing developments with respect to the Anglican Covenant and how this church might continue its participation.” That task force would report its findings to the next convention in 2015.] An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Smithfield, NC In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL By Marites N. SisonPosted Mar 18, 2013 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY last_img read more

Lent Madness 2013 Gold Halo winner crowned

first_img The Rev. Dr. Fran Toy says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Lent Patricia Downing says: Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group John Simpson says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL April 3, 2013 at 10:28 am I missed lenten madness this year but will be ready to go next lent. How many days to Ash Wednesday/ So glad Frances perkins got the golden halo. Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Tags Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Music Morristown, NJ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Comments (5) Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Featured Jobs & Calls Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 28, 2013 at 4:59 pm YEA!!!! I am absolutely thrilled!!! Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release [Lent Madness – press release] While college basketball fans are in the midst of March Madness, Christians can now relax after a nail-biting finish to Lent Madness 2013. In the final match-up, former Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins worked her way past St. Luke to win the coveted Golden Halo.Throughout the season of Lent thousands of voters have cast their ballots for their favorite saints through this engaging online devotional tool designed to help people learn about saints. There have been upsets and thrilling, come-from-behind victories as the field has been whittled down from 32 starters, to the Saintly Sixteen, the Elate Eight, the Faithful Four, and eventually the two finalists.Frances Perkins became known as the architect of the New Deal while she served as Secretary of Labor in the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration. But she wasn’t merely a government bureaucrat. Perkins’ compassion came at least in part from her strong Christian faith. She was a regular worshiper in Episcopal churches and was added to the Episcopal Church calendar in 2009 for optional commemoration. She is the first American to win the Golden Halo. Previous winners were Mary Magdalene (2012), C. S. Lewis (2011), and George Herbert (2010).The “celebrity blogger” who promoted the cause of Frances Perkins, Heidi Shott, canon for communications and social justice in the Episcopal Diocese of Maine, said, “I am thrilled – and not a little bit stunned – that Frances Perkins made her way to the Golden Halo. As a lay woman in the Episcopal Church, I am so pleased that Perkins’ witness will be magnified both in the Episcopal Church and beyond.”Musing on this year’s winner, Lent Madness creator, the Rev. Tim Schenck, says “One of the fun things about Lent Madness is people learning about lesser known inspirational figures. In this case Frances Perkins captured the hearts and minds of the voting public and swept to an unlikely victory. I assure you no one who filled out a bracket had her going all the way!”Frances Perkins had deep family roots in Maine. The Episcopal bishop of Maine, the Rt. Rev. Stephen Lane, said, “I’m delighted that Frances Perkins has won the Golden Halo. She is an icon for how baptized persons live out their ministry in the world.”Mary Jo Curtis, director of media relations for Mt. Holyoke College, is rightfully proud. “Frances Perkins has been an inspiration to generations of Mount Holyoke women, and it’s been deeply gratifying to see the Lent Madness community learn of her and her life of good work – work that has shaped our country and helped so many. We are so pleased and proud to see her win the Golden Halo. We always knew she was an extraordinary and special woman, and now others know it, too.”Lent Madness began in 2010 as the brainchild of Schenck, rector of St. John’s Church in Hingham, Massachusetts. In seeking a fun, engaging way for people to learn about the men and women comprising the church’s calendar of saints, Schenck came up with this unique Lenten devotion. Combining his love of sports with his passion for the lives of the saints, Lent Madness was born on his blog “Clergy Family Confidential.”Starting in 2012, Schenck partnered with Forward Movement, a publisher and spiritual vitality catalyst in the Episcopal Church. The Rev. Scott Gunn, executive director of Forward Movement, said, “Nearly 100,000 people took part in Lent Madness this year, forming a massive online community in which we all learned a bit more about how God works in the lives of people struggling much as we do. Lent Madness is not only fun, but it teaches us there is hope for us, too.”Forward Movement has worked since 1935 to bring vitality and spiritual health to the church and its people. Based in Cincinnati, OH, Forward Movement is widely known for Forward Day by Day. Lent Madness is one of many ways that Forward Movement hopes to encourage spiritual growth throughout our whole lives. Forward Movement is a ministry of The Episcopal Church. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest center_img Rector Pittsburgh, PA Donn Mitchell says: Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK cheryl learn says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Belleville, IL Press Release Service Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Bath, NC Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Lent Madness 2013 Gold Halo winner crowned Frances Perkins, first female cabinet secretary, defeats St. Luke Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME March 28, 2013 at 3:07 pm Madame Perkins was a daily communicant at St. James’ Church on Capitol Hill while serving as the Secretary of Labor. Her fellow parishioner was Mr. Henry Wallace who was secretary of Agriculture, later the Vice President. The two of them would join the rector for breakfast after the morning mass. There they shared the burdens facing the people due to the depression and the dust bowl. The idea of social security was born out of their discussions. Comments are closed. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI March 28, 2013 at 6:05 pm Back in 1995, I orgnized the Frances Perkins Memorial Conference on the Church and Labor, which met at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine in New York. It was our hope at the time that she would become better known to the church the nurtured her powerful faith and profoundly effective ministry. At that time, we called on the church to add her to the calendar. I am delighted that Lent Madness has succeeded in elevating her visibility and improving awareness in the church. For more about here spiritual life, you can read my profile at http://www.AnglicanExaminer.com. Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Submit a Job Listing March 28, 2013 at 4:36 pm I’m not surprised. St. Luke has had a weak backcourt all year, despite all the press. Congrats to Ms. Perkins. It’s good for the game when a Cinderella goes all the way. Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Knoxville, TN Posted Mar 28, 2013 Youth Minister Lorton, VA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group last_img read more

Global network aims to raise awareness, ‘stop genocide in South…

first_img The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA May 18, 2014 at 1:28 am I have South Sudan on my daily prayer list praying for Peace. I support the education of a South Sudanese Girl through our organization Sudanese Youth Opportunity in San Jose, California. Our umbrella organization is Hope With Southern Sudan formed by Rev. Jerry Drino with the Lost Boys of Sudan in San Jose, CA. My Episcopal church is St. Stephen’s in-the Field in San Jose, CA. Many of our church members sponsor children going to school in Kenya at the Junior Sunflower Academy’ I just want to let you know that we on the West Coast are praying for Peace to happen in South Sudan. Sudan & South Sudan Rector Shreveport, LA Wanda Bryan says: Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Comments are closed. TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Collierville, TN Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Global network aims to raise awareness, ‘stop genocide in South Sudan’ Africa, Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Rector Martinsville, VA Comments (1) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Curate Diocese of Nebraska Bishop Joseph Garang Atem of Renk with the Rev. Abraham Awan, assisting priest for Sudanese ministry at St. Paul’s Church by-the-Lake in Chicago.[Episcopal News Service] Members of “the network” ring in faithfully every Friday; a dozen or more callers from across the Anglican Communion with a common mission: to support and advocate for the people of South Sudan.“Our concern as southern Sudanese, and as church leaders, is how to stop this war. Thousands of people are dying,” Bishop Joseph Garang of the Diocese of Renk told others on the group’s April 25 conference call, facilitated by the Rev. Ranjit Mathews, the Episcopal Church’s officer for global relations and networking.“I want to appeal to you, brothers and sisters, that even more important than relief [efforts] is to end this war,” added Garang, who was visiting the Diocese of Chicago, with which his Diocese of Renk shares a companion relationship. “In Renk now there is fighting and a lot of tension … There is fear. We are trying with local resources to keep the peace in the country. People have come from the fighting in Malakal, and that same spirit of fighting has spread.”Reaching across time zones and continents – including Anglicans and Episcopalians from the United States, South Sudan, England, Australia and Canada – the weekly phone-meetings emerged spontaneously after the Dec. 15 deadly clashes escalated to ongoing armed conflict between the South Sudanese government and rebel supporters.Now, the network hopes to raise public awareness and galvanize action with an urgent message to help “stop the genocide in South Sudan.”Companion relationships spawned ‘old school’ communicationsThe network doesn’t really have a formal name but includes individuals, dioceses, agencies – those who share a love for South Sudan and its people and who want peace for the beleaguered nation, Mathews said.Canon Jackie Kraus, a member of St. Michael’s Church in Barrington, Illinois, in the Diocese of Chicago, said she fell in love with Sudan and its people during a 1998 visit.That friendship evolved into companion relationships between the dioceses of Renk and Chicago, where 120 people attended an April 28 afternoon prayer vigil at St. James Cathedral to “pray for peace.”“This vigil comes out of relationships with our friends in Sudan … When people we know and love are in danger, we can do three things: we can pray, we can bear witness, and we can give them our financial resources,” said the Rev. Bonnie Perry, rector of All Saints Church in Chicago, which has sent more than $170,000 to the Diocese of Renk since 2004.“Right now, the church in Renk is overwhelmed by the needs of internally displaced people and returning refugees. They need all three kinds of help from us.”Several other Chicago-area parishes have entered companion relationships with South Sudan, said Kraus, a founding member of AFRECS, the American Friends of the Episcopal Church in Sudan, an advocacy agency whose executive director Richard Parkins also participated in the April 25 meeting.Both expressed frustration on that call at the lack of public awareness for what’s happening in South Sudan.While praising the network’s efforts, Kraus pushed to take the message public, citing a lack of media coverage of the South Sudan crisis “and in the meantime Rwanda is happening in South Sudan. We said we didn’t want that to happen again. Why aren’t we hearing that message?”Parkins agreed. “I’m still amazed that there is little known about what’s going on in South Sudan. At a meeting, a woman next to me said she didn’t believe there was a Christian presence in South Sudan. There’s still a lot of ignorance. How do we do a better job of galvanizing this issue among our faith community?”What’s happening in South Sudan?After decades of civil war with the northern region of the country, South Sudan emerged as a separate nation in 2011. But political tensions boiled over when President Salva Kiir dismissed Vice President Riek Machar and fighting erupted Dec. 15 between their supporters. Some intertribal fighting also ensued; Kiir is Dinka; Machar, of the Nuer tribe.A Jan. 23 ceasefire agreement failed; thousands have been killed, and nearly one million people displaced, according to an April 27 report from the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).Still, the news from Bishop John Gattek of the Diocese of Malakal, also present on the April 25 call, was hopeful.Officials had dropped treason charges against four political detainees accused of attempting to topple the government, thus paving the way for ceasefire negotiations to begin. Still, another opposition demand, to withdraw Ugandan troops from the country, has not been granted, he said.“A relief corridor has been opened from Ethiopia. This is good news,” Gattek said. “It goes through government and rebel-held territories.” He added that details were sketchy about what happened in Renk, where fighting erupted April 23, forcing people to flee to safety.Translating ‘old school communications’ into actionThe network started with e-mails from Robin Denney, an Episcopal Church missionary and agriculture consultant to the Episcopal Church in Sudan from 2009-2011, and Buck Blanchard, director of mission and outreach for the Diocese of Virginia, who has been involved in Sudan for more than a decade, Mathews said.“We saw what was happening in Sudan, and got Richard Parkins [AFRECS executive director] involved,” he recalled.Now the weekly meetings are “old school communication” and a model for other ministry, Blanchard said.“This way, on a regular basis we have folks from the United Kingdom, Australia and bishops from South Sudan weighing in with real time information on what’s happening on the ground, so everybody gets up to speed at the same time. And if fundraising needs to be take place or some prayer or other action needs to happen, we can take care of it,” he told ENS recently.“I do a lot of this work with all kinds of mission efforts in various countries around the world, and I tend to think I’m from the Diocese of Virginia and we do x, y and z. Other dioceses are there yet very rarely do we get on the phone and say, lets all talk about what everybody else is doing so we know and can lend support and so we don’t duplicate efforts.”Julianne Stewart, program director of the Anglican Board of Mission (ABM) in Australia said she got involved because the network offered “good, up-to-date information about events on the ground in South Sudan from members of the church” not necessarily available elsewhere.The ABM has been working in partnership with the Diocese of Salisbury in the Church of England, where the Rev. Canon Ian Woodward serves as vice chair of the diocesan partnership link with the Episcopal Church in Sudan and South Sudan.Together, they have helped facilitate development of theological as well as secondary education in South Sudan and engage advocacy work with British politicians regarding the world’s newest country.“We are working hard to support the humanitarian efforts … with AFRECS,” Woodward said in an e-mail to ENS. “We are also seeking to help the front-line bishops who, because of the current conflict, are unable to be in their dioceses and need help to support their families and flocks,” he said.Buy a heart, share love with South SudanBishop Cate Waynick, a network member whose Diocese of Indianapolis began a three-way companion relationship with the dioceses of Bor and Brasilia in 2002, called the recent developments “just devastating … beyond horrendous.”She recalled a 2002 visit to Bor “when we were out in the middle of nowhere but they had a generator they turned on after dark and we could watch CNN out of Europe. We were hearing about tensions in North Korea and things happening in Mexico and whatever was going on in the Middle East and problems in Myanmar but there was never any reporting about South Sudan.” It made the people feel as is “nobody knows, nobody cares … so it completely undid them to have a U.S. bishop and a Brazilian bishop show up.”While in Bor, Waynick ordained four new priests “three of whom were women. They were the first women to be ordained priests in that diocese. I believe one of them was among those killed in the cathedral in February,” she said.“For us, these are not just statistics we are hearing about. They’ve been here, they’ve stayed in our homes, we’ve been there and played with their children, spent time with their mothers. These are friends. We worshipped with them at St. Andrew’s Cathedral in Bor, which is just not there anymore.“I go online and there are some BBC posts but we’re not getting any substantial news coverage of this. The U.S. public is unaware of it.”Consequently, the Indianapolis diocese has undertaken “Sharing Love with South Sudan,” a long-term fund- and consciousness-raising project, to sell for a minimum $5, heart-shaped pins that give basic info about South Sudan along with website addresses.Waynick also made a presentation to the House of Bishops to ask for support and funds to help South Sudan.Political activism with AFRECSAFRECS’ Parkins said that Renk Bishop Garang also will visit Washington, D.C., and will meet with U.S. State Department Africa Bureau staff, as well as the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Institute for Peace, and, hopefully, with congressional and faith leaders.In a newsletter article to AFRECS supporters, he described the network’s efforts to support Garang and other bishops in their ministry of peace and reconciliation.“Our prayer is that circumstances will permit a real peace to take hold,” he said. “We have learned about a project in the Kakuma Camp in Kenya where pastors from different ethnic groups will be trained in peace and healing techniques.“We know of efforts to form peace institutes in the Bishop Gwynne [in Juba] and Renk colleges of theology, where pastors and lay leaders will be trained as catalysts for peace and reconciliation throughout South Sudan,” he said.” We have made each other aware of attempts to raise funds to relieve the suffering of the thousands displaced by the war. We have sent out an appeal for equipping bishops in the most impacted regions so that they can continue their pastoral outreach to their people.“What is most significant about these [network] calls is the message that they convey: that those in the South Sudan have not been forgotten. Those who join these calls are determined that war and destruction will not be the ultimate outcome of South Sudan’s recent struggle.”Above all pray, said Garang, “because we believe, as Christians, in the power of prayer.”It “raises the morale of the people of Renk to know that people across the sea are thinking of them,” he said, in a press release announcing the vigil in Chicago.“It sends a message to politicians and those in charge … why are we killing each other? We are important enough that there are people to care for us and are praying for us,” he said. “Without help and support we cannot make peace. We are looking for support from our brothers and sisters … We need you now more than ever.”–The Rev. Pat McCaughan is a correspondent for the Episcopal News Service. She is based in Los Angeles. Rector Washington, DC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Director of Music Morristown, NJ By Pat McCaughanPosted Apr 28, 2014 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Bishops lead march against gun violence: Full coverage

first_img Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Martinsville, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Bath, NC Gun Violence March 2015 Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Advocacy Peace & Justice, Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 General Convention, Gun Violence, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Bishops lead march against gun violence: Full coverage Submit a Job Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Curate Diocese of Nebraska Posted Jun 28, 2015 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY General Convention 2015, Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Tags Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TNlast_img read more

Royal celebration marks 150 years of reader ministry

first_img Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Knoxville, TN May 10, 2016 at 5:56 pm Before I became an Episcopalian, the Eucharistic Minister was very important to me in the worship service. I feel very blessed to have been chosen to be a reader. I agree with Frank’s comment and would like for the TEC’s consideration. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Anglican Communion News Service] The Queen’s husband, the Duke of Edinburgh, joined more than 600 lay readers at a service in London last week to celebrate 150 years of Reader Ministry. Prince Philip was the guest of honor at All Soul’s Langham Place, in London, for the service which was led by Archbishop of York John Sentamu.Sentamu interrupted his six-month sabbatical pilgrimage through the Diocese of York to lead the service, which was also attended by around 40 other bishops.“We were honored that Prince Philip was able to join us and are grateful to him for his very many years as patron of the Readers Council,” Bishop of Sodor and Man Robert Paterson, chair of the Readers’ Council, said. “Readers are the unsung heroes of many churches, supporting clergy and congregations as well as conducting funerals and acting as chaplains in places such as prisons and hospitals. It was important to be able to shine a light on this valuable form of ministry and give thanks for generations of quiet dedication and commitment.”Readers are lay people from all walks of life who are licensed by their bishop to a teaching and preaching ministry. They work with ordained and lay colleagues, usually serving within a ministry team. There are currently over 9,000 active readers in the Church of England and the Church in Wales.Each diocese has its own program of training. Many C of E Readers now receive a training award that is accredited by the University of Durham under the Common Awards scheme. Training usually lasts three years and is intended to develop both theological understanding and practical ministry skills.“Reader ministry has never been static, and, partly as a result of the pressures of two world wars, Readers drifted, willingly for the most part, into the multiple roles of general ecclesiastical factotum, eucharistic minister, often churchwarden, priest’s assistant, omnipresent helper,” Paterson said in his sermon. “That can’t be right: the church trains readers to be competent with the Bible, and with the application of Scripture in their context.“It is a distinct ministry with a distinct potential and a clear integrity, helping other people to hear and make sense of what God is saying to them in their unique place and time. You are trained in theology; God-talk is your specialism, which is why the training is tough and demanding. It’s not about being other-worldly, or technically competent in the dating of Deuteronomy or the symbolism of the Revelation, but being a person who can bring God into the conversation with people who are searching and with those who have lost their way.“Being a theologian in a secular culture is, in the words of Archbishop Michael Ramsey, ‘to be exposed to the vision of heaven and to the tragedies of mankind.’”Festivities marking the 150th anniversary will continue on July 16 with a day festival in Leicester’s De Montfort Hall. “Following the All Souls service of thanksgiving for what has been and what we have, this festival will look forward – growing lay discipleship,” the Readers’ Council secretary, Alan Wakely, said.Speakers include the writer and biblical studies lecturer Paula Gooder; Mark Russell,  chief executive of Church Army; Mark Greene, author and speaker from the London Institute of Contemporary Christianity; the Bible Reading Fellowship’s Debbie Thrower; and the founder of the Street Angels movement, Paul Blakey. Featured Events Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Royal celebration marks 150 years of reader ministry Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Anglican Communion Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit an Event Listing Comments (2) Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Shreveport, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Albany, NY Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Job Listing Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Hopkinsville, KY May 9, 2016 at 10:08 pm Something we should have in TEC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Carole G Pryor says: Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Tags Rector Bath, NC Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Submit a Press Release Posted May 9, 2016 Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Frank Riggio-Preston says: last_img read more

Feligreses de los Cayos de la Florida reciben al Obispo…

first_img Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Por Amy SowderPosted Jan 17, 2018 Escombros, en particular  grandes equipos electrodomésticos, aún pueden verse en algunas partes de los Cayos de la Florida, que fueron azotados por el huracán Irma el 10 de septiembre. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENS.[Episcopal News Service —Cayos de la Florida] Cuatro meses después del huracán Irma, refrigeradores y lavadores se enmohecen en las cunetas de los Cayos de la Florida. Gran parte de los escombros que flanqueaban la autopista U.S. 1 ya han sido removidos, pero el hedor de la basura descompuesta sigue siendo muy marcado en algunas partes. Palmas dobladas y estropeadas bordean las aguas azul turquesa con nuevas plantaciones de palmas sostenidas por maderos. Las dársenas se ven abandonadas con muelles sin embarcaciones.Una vez que pasó la crisis inicial, se activaron tanto la fatiga como la gratitud a largo plazo de los episcopales en los Cayos, parte de la Diócesis del Sudeste de la Florida.El obispo primado Michael Curry y su delegación visitaron el 13 de enero congregaciones en las islas afectadas por el huracán con el objetivo de consolidar la unidad: con Dios, con sus cofeligreses, con otras congregaciones de la diócesis, así como con la Iglesia Episcopal y la gente de tierra firme. Unidos, más recuperación es posible, dijo Curry.El obispo primado Michael Curry escucha a Alison Cook (“Sonny”) y mira las fotos de los daños dejados por el huracán que ella le muestra. Cook vive en un estacionamiento de remolques detrás de la iglesia episcopal de San Columba en Maratón, el punto intermedio de los Cayos de la Florida. Su hogar fu destruido por el huracán Irma. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENS.“Cuando soy fuerte, ustedes no tienen que serlo. Cuando ustedes son fuertes., yo no tengo que serlo”, le dijo Curry a los miembros de la iglesia de Santiago el Pescador  [St. James The Fisherman] en Isla Morada. Santiago es una de las cinco congregaciones de la diócesis en los Cayos. Hay 76 congregaciones en la diócesis, que se extiende por 437 kilómetros de norte a sur.El impacto de Irma a largo plazoAl impactar la zona media y baja de los Cayos, Irma dejó caer más de 300 mililitros de lluvia y sus vientos de 209 kilómetros por hora trajeron a la costa un mar de leva de más de 2 metros que afectó más de 1.300 embarcaciones, muchas de las cuales eran las viviendas principales de las personas. Si bien la tormenta tocó tierra en el cayo Cudjoe, Pino Grande [Big Pine] fue otra de las islas que azotó con mayor rigor.A través de los Cayos, más de 10.000 casas fueron dañadas o destruidas. Y esas eran las viviendas de gente de clase obrera, no residencias de vacaciones, dijo Peter Eaton, obispo del Sudeste de la Florida. Muchas personas estuvieron sin electricidad de tres semanas a un mes.La pesca es la principal industria de los Cayos, a la que le sigue el turismo. Las temporadas de [la pesca] de la langosta y del cangrejo moro han sido un fiasco, lo cual ha significado un impacto económico porque la captura en los Cayos surte a restaurantes y compañías en todo el país, explicó Eaton.  Aparte de la meca turística que es Cayo Hueso en el extremo sur, la mayoría de los cayos son rurales.El obispo primado Michael Curry conforta a algunos episcopales en San Francisco en los Cayos, una iglesita del cayo Pino Grande. La islita se vio seriamente afectada por el huracán Irma, pero la iglesia se mantiene en pie. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENS.Los habitantes de los Cayos se están yendo porque los dueños no están reparando sus viviendas inhabitables, dijo Eaton. “El mayor desafío es mantener a la gente en los Cayos, y mantenerlos trabajando”,  señaló. La pérdida de viviendas para trabajadores exacerba el problema.El preescolar episcopal de Santiago el Pescador en la norteña Isla Morada perdió dos familia,  recibió a cuatro familias y tiene una lista de espera para la matrícula en la escuela que tiene una capacidad máxima de 12 estudiantes, dijo la administradora Michelle Lane. A través del Condado de Monroe, Irma dejó a más de 300 niños sin hogar, señalo Lane.Lane y los líderes del condado temen que la población de los Cayos pueda decrecer hasta en un 20 por ciento. Los guías de pesca y los pescadores comerciales no tienen trabajo. Enero y febrero son el pico de la estación turística y de las llamados “aves migratorias” (la gente del norte que viene a invernar), pero la gente no está viniendo. Muchos balnearios están cerrados.“Para nosotros quedarnos aquí, tenemos que tener dos trabajos”, dijo Victoria Kennedy, una joven de 17 años y miembro de la iglesia de Santiago. “No hay muchas personas de clase media aquí”.Una vez que a los residentes de los Cayos les permitieron regresar a la zona, la enfermera jubilada Shirl McAllister, que ha vivido en Maratón durante 30 años, descubrió que Irma le había destrozado la casa. Le había llevado las puertas, las ventanas y los muros. Le pagaron unos $15.000 sólo para derribar lo que quedaba. Ella tiene que volver a trabajar, sin embargo, no querría irse.“La gente dice ‘¿por qué no recoges y te vas?’ Pero hemos estado aquí durante mucho tiempo y somos viejos”, le dijo McAllister a Curry, con lágrimas en los ojos. Por el momento, ella está viviendo en un remolque facilitado por FEMA.“A pesar de todo, los voluntarios han mostrado mucho amor y compasión. Es sencillamente increíble. Es asombroso”,  dijo McAllister. “He donado cajas a esta iglesia durante años. Nunca pensé que me sería devuelto. Eso me hizo creyente. Le puedo decir eso”.Iglesias de los Cayos de la FloridaIrma arrancó la aguja de la iglesia de Santiago el Pescador desde [encima del] salón parroquial y el preescolar y la lanzó al terreno del estacionamiento en la acera de enfrente junto a un parque de casas móviles destruido y vacío.“Ese barrio, todos sus escombros, estaba en nuestro estacionamiento. Pero se inundó”, dijo la administradora de la iglesia, Michelle Lane.En el cayo norte de Isla Morada, el huracán Irma arrancó la aguja del campanario de la iglesia de Santiago el Pescador y la lanzó al estacionamiento de la acera de enfrente. Foto Amy Sowder/ENS.Curry le recordó a la congregación que cuanto más turbulenta se torna la vida, tanto más profundamente las personas deben buscar la ayuda de Dios y más ampliamente necesitan acercarse a los demás.“Cuando el resto del mundo gira como loco, eso los afirmará a ustedes. Dios tiene la fuerza de que ustedes carecen”, añadió.Aférrense a las prácticas espirituales de la oración, del estudio de la Escritura, de la reunión como comunidad y de recibir la comunión, afirmó. “Funciona”, dijo Curry.La transición es algo que sucede en todas nuestras vidas, pero especialmente después de desastres naturales, dijo el obispo Todd Ousley, de la Oficina de Desarrollo Pastoral de la Iglesia Episcopal, que acompañó a Curry en su visita aquí y a las Islas Vírgenes a principios de la semana. Practicar el cuidado de uno mismo puede significar no sólo mantener tus prácticas religiosas, sino también ejercitarse, comer bien y a veces conversar con un terapeuta capacitado. “Cuando vienen los huracanes, eso no sólo les afecta el paisaje, sino que también les afecta sus vidas y a su comunidad”.La Rda. Debra Maconaughey de la iglesia episcopal de San Columba en Maratón, el punto medio de los Cayos, consiguió 19 casas móviles, algunas con la colaboración del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo.La episcopal Alison Cook (“Sonny”),  de 88 años, está viviendo en tráiler provisto por la iglesia detrás de San Columba. Su casa móvil, a unos 3 kilómetros al este de la iglesia, quedó destruida.  “Estuve allí en Año Nuevo. Me había quedado con unos amigos hasta entonces”, dijo Cook mientras ofrecía un recorrido por su nueva casa de momento, la cual había decorado con un mantel de papagayos y, en la cama, con un oso de peluche con una camiseta de “acción de gracias”.Alison Cook (“Sonny”) de 88 años y episcopal de toda la vida, vive en un tráiler detrás de la iglesia episcopal de San Columba en Maratón, el punto central de los Cayos de la Florida. Su hogar quedó destruido cuando el paso del huracán Irma. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENS.Contando los edificios de la iglesia, Maconaughey alberga a unas 100 personas en cualquier tiempo, con permiso del gobierno municipal.“Episcopales de todos los Estados Unidos nos han ayudado”, dijo Maconaughey. “Realmente hemos sentido que todos somos la Iglesia”.Antes de la tormenta, Rick Kidwell vivía en un velero con sus dos hijas. Su familia y más de una docena de amigos se refugiaron en San Columba. Ahora, están viviendo en un tráiler, y él ayuda a descargar suministros de camiones, a remover escombros de patios y casas  y a arrancar placas de yeso mohosas como coordinador del proyecto de desastres de la iglesia.Kidwell ve el ayudar a otros igual que ayudarse a sí mismo. “Los Cayos son pequeños, de manera que todo es mi traspatio”, afirmó.San  Francisco de los Cayos [St. Francis in the Keys] es una iglesia diminuta en medio del destrozado paisaje de Pino Grande, una de las islas que sufrió el embate de Irma. El Rdo. Chris Todd y su esposa, Julia, están viviendo en un cuarto de su casa. Sólo esta semana pasada, un equipo se llevó los electrodomésticos y otros escombros que aún se alineaban en las calles de su barrio cuatro meses después de la tormenta. “Pero todavía hay una embarcación en nuestra calle. Quizá la pinza [del camión] no era lo bastante grande”, dijo riéndose el sacerdote.Julia Todd, esposa del Rdo. Chris Todd, de la iglesia de San Francisco de los Cayos, una diminuta iglesia episcopal en Pino Grande, hace galletitas dulces con los niños de la iglesia para la visita del obispo primado Michael Curry y del obispo diocesano Peter Eaton. Pino Grande fue uno de los Cayos de la Florida que recibió la embestida del huracán Irma el 10 de septiembre. Foto de Amy Sowder/ENS.Judee Lyon, feligresa de San Francisco, encontró un motivo de gratitud en medio de la destrucción. “Tengo los mejores mangos de los Cayos y nuestro árbol sigue estando allí”.En el extremo sur de los Cayos, los miembros de las iglesias de San Pablo [St. Paul] y San Pedro [St. Peter] en Cayo Hueso se reunieron para hablar con Curry.Sherri Hodies, feligresa de San Pablo, vivía en el cayo Pan de Azúcar [Sugarloaf] a unos 300 metros de donde el huracán tocó tierra y ocho tornados pasaron por su casa. Sin embargo, ella ayudó a coordinar la donación de frazadas de una iglesia de Ohio y le dio a Curry una que quedaba para ayudar a alguien en Houston, Texas, que sufrió los embates del huracán Harvey . “Me siento afortunada, aunque esté frágil”, dijo Hodies.Pese a la orden de evacuación obligatoria, Esther Whyms, feligresa de San Pedro, pasó la tormenta en su casa y estaba asombrada de la afluencia de ayuda que siguió. “Tuvimos ayuda de personas de todas partes”, le dijo Whyms a Curry. “Nunca había visto tanta gente unirse [para una causa]”.— Amy Sowder es corresponsal especial de Episcopal News Service y escritora independiente radicada en Brooklyn. Pueden dirigirse a ella a [email protected] Traducción de Vicente Echerri. This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Tags Feligreses de los Cayos de la Florida reciben al Obispo Primado en sus iglesias afectadas por el huracán. ‘Asombrados’ los episcopales de los Cayos por la ayuda, local y nacional,  que han recibido Press Release Service New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. 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