More people should be The Apprentice

first_img Share More people should be The Apprentice WHEN the City opened its doors to the barrow boys of the East End – the wheeler dealer market traders who were first let loose on the London Stock Exchange in the 1980s – they were a roaring success. They had the drive, the hunger and the charisma to allow them to thrive in the pressure-cooker environment of the trading floor. “When I look at young people from inner city areas today I see those exact same attributes.”Tim Campbell has come a long way since winning the first season of Lord Sugar’s The Apprentice. The former Transport for London manager has a dream of sparking a second City revolution, bringing a new generation of disillusioned youth into the financial services industry and blowing away the cobwebs of the Gordon Gekko era.“I think a lot of young people have this blinkered view that the Square Mile is still all toffs from elite schools with posh accents and double breasted suits,” he says. “But the City is changing.”Campbell is helping to drive that change by throwing his weight behind a government-backed apprenticeship scheme, timed to coincide with National Apprenticeship Week, which starts today. The project, supported by Boris Johnson, is aiming to vastly increase the number of people taking part in on-the-job training.It received a blow this week, with new figures suggesting more than a quarter of apprentices drop out before their placements are finished (although this is down from around 75 per cent in 2002). But Campbell is convinced the project can help get young people into work. He says the biggest misconception is that apprenticeships are for “people in boiler suits who are going to go off and bang pieces of metal”. While these jobs exist, the scheme boasts 80 different industry sectors, with an emphasis on finance.“There is work for people who want to do administration and people with degrees who want to go into high-flying institutions. It really covers all the bases”.Sitting with me today wearing a sharp blue suit and waistcoat, Campbell is a classic case of a “working class boy done good”. He was raised in a poor household in Stratford – an area that is undergoing regeneration on an unprecedented level. Now he can boast his own charity, a concierge business, a tailoring company, a non-executive position at a financial recruitment business and various investments among his interests.And while Campbell is best known for winning The Apprentice, he says his selection as an ambassador of the project is no publicity stunt.“Boris came along to an event my charity was hosting and asked me if I’d work with him on the scheme. I was a bit worried it might just be a tokenistic thing, which I’m not interested in. But I looked him in the eye and he convinced me he is passionate about helping young people.“He’s an incredible ambassador for London, always promoting it. I remember him talking to a French delegation about business in London. He had visited a bakery in Walthamstow and he told the minister that he should let French people eat cake – British cake.”Campbell quit his £100,000-a-year job with Lord Sugar after two years. He describes his time there as inspirational, but says Lord Sugar “certainly got his pound of flesh”.“There was no sitting around twiddling your thumbs. You have to work for a six figure salary. I launched a product that went on sale in Harrods and Argos – both ends of the spectrum – and I got some amazing insight out of that.”After leaving Amstrad he started a charity called the Bright Ideas Trust, working with young people from inner city areas who have ideas for starting businesses. The scheme, backed by Bank of America, has already helped start 26 companies, taking a line of young people “from the dole queue to the tax system”.While his charity is doing good work in attracting young people into business, he says institutional change is needed to educate young people in finance.“It’s incredibly important to put business literacy in schools. What I want is for people to have a greater understanding of how business works so they can be better business owners or consumers.”To implement this properly, he says the private sector must get involved.“We have this antiquated view that we need to keep the private and public sectors separate but it’s ridiculous. The private sector could quite easily roll out a financial education scheme.”For now, Campbell will concentrate on working directly with young people, providing them with the help he says was key to his own achievements. With the apprenticeship scheme, he should get the chance to inspire many more young people to emulate his success.CV | TIM CAMPBELLBorn: 27 June 1977.From: Stratford, east London.Education: St Bonaventure’s RC School – 3 A-Levels and 11 GCSEs.Psychology BSc, Middlesex University.Human Resource Management CIPD Thames Valley.Career: Graduate trainee for London Underground.Resourcing consultant and senior planner for London public transport, where Campbell was the youngest middle manager the company has ever had.Director of Health & Beauty at Amstrad.Chief executive at the Bright Ideas Trust, a charity set up to help young people get involved in business, offering mentoring and financial backing.Notable achievements and hobbies: Wining BBC’s The Apprentice. Enjoys boxing and martial arts.Family: A daughter and a son. whatsapp Show Comments ▼ KCS-content center_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastZen HeraldNASA’s Voyager 2 Has Entered Deep Space – And It Brought Scientists To Their KneesZen HeraldSerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBrake For ItThe Most Worthless Cars Ever MadeBrake For ItWanderoamIdentical Twins Marry Identical Twins – But Then The Doctor Says, “STOP”WanderoamBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.com Sunday 6 February 2011 9:35 pm Tags: NULL whatsapp More From Our Partners Killer drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgSupermodel Anne Vyalitsyna claims income drop, pushes for child supportnypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comConnecticut man dies after crashing Harley into live bearnypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orglast_img read more

3 simple steps I’d take to prepare for another FTSE 100 stock market crash

first_img3 simple steps I’d take to prepare for another FTSE 100 stock market crash Peter Stephens | Thursday, 9th July, 2020 | More on: ^FTSE Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Image source: Getty Images. Peter Stephens has no position in any of the shares mentioned. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997”center_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares The FTSE 100’s stock market crash in February/March 2020 took almost all investors by surprise. It was caused by an exceptional event that was unprecedented, so many investors were unable to prepare for it.Looking ahead, risks such as a second wave of coronavirus, Brexit and the upcoming US election could cause investor sentiment to weaken. This may result in a further stock market crash in the coming months.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Here’s how investors may wish to prepare for that prospect, while continuing to invest in undervalued stocks today to benefit from a likely long-term recovery.Cash holdingsAvoiding FTSE 100 shares and holding your capital in a cash savings account is likely to mean lower returns over the long run. However, having some cash on hand in case the stock market declines over the coming months could be a shrewd move.It may allow you to capitalise on even lower stock market valuations without having to sell other assets. Furthermore, it can provide an investor with the ability to quickly react to market downturns if cash is easily accessible.Holding some cash instead of being fully invested in FTSE 100 shares may also provide peace of mind. Having sufficient capital available for emergencies that may unfortunately become more common over the coming months, such as employment challenges, could also be a prudent move. It should mean you are not required to sell stock market investments at lower prices.Identifying FTSE 100 companiesThe FTSE 100’s recent rebound may mean that some stocks are now trading at price levels that you feel are somewhat unattractive. However, it is still a good idea to analyse those companies now to determine whether they could offer good value for money. After all, they could be bargains if a market crash occurs over the short run.Being in a position to buy specific stocks quickly could be an advantage for an investor. As the recent market crash showed, the window of opportunity to buy shares can be relatively short. Being in a position where you know which companies you want to buy, and at what general price, could allow you to react more quickly to rapidly-changing market conditions.Opening a Stocks and Shares ISABuying FTSE 100 shares today in a Stocks and Shares ISA is a simple and low-cost means of investing in a tax-efficient manner. Therefore, ensuring that you have an ISA opened and ready to be used for investing in a diverse range of companies right now could be a sound move ahead of a possible market crash.If you are ready to invest in high-quality stocks then you may be better placed to capitalise on what could prove to be a very volatile stock market as the world gradually emerges from a period of lockdown measures. Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. Enter Your Email Address See all posts by Peter Stephenslast_img read more

What are my best UK shares to buy now in an ISA to make a passive income?

first_imgWhat are my best UK shares to buy now in an ISA to make a passive income? Enter Your Email Address Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Making a worthwhile passive income with UK shares is a realistic aim for ISA investors. Certainly, some FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 stocks have cut back on their dividends this year. But many others continue to pay generous dividends that may make them attractive purchases at the present time.Their appeal could increase over the coming years, as low interest rates look set to stay for a prolonged period of time. By building a diverse portfolio of dividend-paying shares, it’s possible to limit risks and enjoy a growing income return in the long run. These are some of my favourites.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…Opportunities to make a passive income from UK sharesFTSE 100 stocks such as BAE and British American Tobacco offer relatively high passive incomes compared to other UK shares. Their yields currently stand at around 5% and 8% apiece, which is above the income returns available across most of the index.The two companies have experienced uncertain operating conditions of late, as per most of the FTSE 100 and FTSE 250. However, BAE’s market position suggests that it’s well placed to deliver improving financial performance as defence spending globally increases over the long run. It also delivered a resilient performance compared to its peers in the last global recession. Meanwhile, investment in new markets and in acquisitions could improve its competitive position.British American Tobacco appears to offer a more attractive passive income than other UK shares. It also has a high likelihood of offering a resilient income return in the coming years. Although demand for cigarettes is falling, this is largely being offset by price rises. The end result is a growing bottom line that may mean higher dividends continue to be affordable. British American Tobacco is also investing in next-generation products that may catalyse its dividend growth prospects.FTSE 100 ISA investing opportunitiesOther opportunities to make an attractive passive income from UK shares include mining companies such as Rio Tinto and Polymetal. They have dividend yields of 6.6% and 6.2% respectively. This may mean they’re attractive despite the potential for share price volatility in the short run caused by an uncertain economic environment. Their financial performances this year have been relatively robust. However, they are clearly are more dependent on the global economic outlook than is the case for many FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 shares.As such, they highlight the importance of building a diverse portfolio of stocks. This year has shown that unforeseen events can take place that impact negatively on a company’s ability to make dividend payouts. ISA investors should, therefore, buy a wide range of UK shares when seeking to make a passive income. This may reduce their reliance on a small number of companies. It may also provide  opportunities to generate dividend growth from a broad section of the best businesses. Peter Stephens owns shares of BAE Systems, British American Tobacco, and Rio Tinto. The Motley Fool UK has no position in any of the shares mentioned. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. See all posts by Peter Stephens “This Stock Could Be Like Buying Amazon in 1997” Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares Click here to claim your copy now — and we’ll tell you the name of this Top US Share… free of charge! Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Peter Stephens | Friday, 4th December, 2020 I’m sure you’ll agree that’s quite the statement from Motley Fool Co-Founder Tom Gardner.But since our US analyst team first recommended shares in this unique tech stock back in 2016, the value has soared.What’s more, we firmly believe there’s still plenty of upside in its future. In fact, even throughout the current coronavirus crisis, its performance has been beating Wall St expectations.And right now, we’re giving you a chance to discover exactly what has got our analysts all fired up about this niche industry phenomenon, in our FREE special report, A Top US Share From The Motley Fool. I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement.last_img read more

The GSK share price is up 14% in 3 months. Can it keep rising?

first_img Our 6 ‘Best Buys Now’ Shares I would like to receive emails from you about product information and offers from The Fool and its business partners. Each of these emails will provide a link to unsubscribe from future emails. More information about how The Fool collects, stores, and handles personal data is available in its Privacy Statement. What next for GSK?Fortunately, the shares have since rebounded and closed at 1,353.2p on Wednesday. That’s an increase of over 160p — almost a seventh (13.6%) — in three months. As a long-suffering shareholder, I’m pleased that the GSK share price has bottomed out and bounced back. But what might keep this recent price momentum going?First, GSK needs to reverse the multi-year decline in revenues (down 2% in 2020). With 20 assets in late-stage development, there may be progress in this direction in 2022/23. Second, shareholders would welcome higher earnings per share (EPS). In 2020, adjusted EPS of 115.9p were down 6%, but EPS are also expected to fall in 2021. Of course, declining EPS would usually translate into a lower GSK share price, all else being equal.Third, it would be good to have stronger guidance on the yearly cash dividend of 80p per share. Currently, GSK’s dividend yield is a generous 5.9%, more than two percentage points higher than the FTSE 100’s. But shareholders have already been warned by CEO Emma Walmsley to expect a dividend cut when GSK breaks into two groups (BioPharma and Consumer Healthcare) in 2022. A clearer message on expected future dividends might support and sustain a higher GSK share price.Finally, it might well be time for change at the top. The CEO has sat in the top seat since April 2017, more than four years. I know dozens of GSK insiders feel that it’s time for a new hand on the tiller. Or perhaps a takeover at a premium price might be the best outcome for shareholders and the GSK share price? For now, I’ll just have to wait and see. We think that when a company’s CEO owns 12.1% of its stock, that’s usually a very good sign.But with this opportunity it could get even better.Still only 55 years old, he sees the chance for a new “Uber-style” technology.And this is not a tiny tech startup full of empty promises.This extraordinary company is already one of the largest in its industry.Last year, revenues hit a whopping £1.132 billion.The board recently announced a 10% dividend hike.And it has been a superb Motley Fool income pick for 9 years running!But even so, we believe there could still be huge upside ahead.Clearly, this company’s founder and CEO agrees. Cliff D’Arcy | Thursday, 27th May, 2021 | More on: GSK The Motley Fool UK’s Top Income Stock… Simply click below to discover how you can take advantage of this. Image: GlaxoSmithKline Renowned stock-picker Mark Rogers and his analyst team at The Motley Fool UK have named 6 shares that they believe UK investors should consider buying NOW.So if you’re looking for more stock ideas to try and best position your portfolio today, then it might be a good day for you. Because we’re offering a full 33% off your first year of membership to our flagship share-tipping service, backed by our ‘no quibbles’ 30-day subscription fee refund guarantee. Enter Your Email Address The GSK share price is up 14% in 3 months. Can it keep rising? Learn how you can grab this ‘Top Income Stock’ Report now With a market value of £68bn, GlaxoSmithKline (LSE: GSK) is one of the FTSE 100 index’s largest members. Today, it’s the Footsie’s seventh-largest constituent. However, unlike many other blue-chip shares, the GSK share price has declined during 2020/21. Currently, it stands almost £5 below its January 2020 peak. Recently, the shares have bounced back from their 2021 low. So what might give this sickly stock a further shot in the arm?The GSK share price divesThe GSK share price was riding high 14 months ago. On 17 January 2020, it hit its 2020 closing high of 1,846p. A week later, on 24 January, it hit an intra-day high of 1,857p. But it’s been pretty much all downhill since. Despite being the world’s #1 vaccine manufacturer, GSK fell behind its ‘Big Pharma’ rivals in bringing a Covid-19 vaccine to market. Thus, it was well behind the curve when news of several effective vaccines arrived in early November.5G is here – and shares of this ‘sleeping giant’ could be a great way for you to potentially profit!According to one leading industry firm, the 5G boom could create a global industry worth US$12.3 TRILLION out of thin air…And if you click here we’ll show you something that could be key to unlocking 5G’s full potential…As well as missing the boat on Covid-19 inoculations, GSK’s yearly revenues have shrunk in recent years. With blockbuster drugs and treatments coming off patent, it desperately needs novel drugs and vaccines to inject new life into the business. Hence, the GSK share price saw some fairly steep falls in 2020/21, as disappointed shareholders sold out and moved on.On Meltdown Monday (23 March 2020), the GSK share price closed at 1,374.6p, down more than 470p in two months. That collapse of more than a quarter (25.5%) was a harder fall than for the wider FTSE 100. However, by 27 April, the shares had come roaring back, closing at 1,703p. Unfortunately, over the next 10 months, the stock slumped. Three months ago, on 26 February, GSK stock hit its 2021 closing low of 1,190.8p. Cliffdarcy owns shares of GlaxoSmithKline. The Motley Fool UK has recommended GlaxoSmithKline. Views expressed on the companies mentioned in this article are those of the writer and therefore may differ from the official recommendations we make in our subscription services such as Share Advisor, Hidden Winners and Pro. Here at The Motley Fool we believe that considering a diverse range of insights makes us better investors. See all posts by Cliff D’Arcylast_img read more

The contenders for Rugby Book of the Year

first_img Top six: the books shortlisted for Rugby Book of the Year, to be announced in June (Alan Pearey) RUGBY BOOK OF THE YEAR WINNERS2008 Ripley’s World – Andy Ripley (Mainstream)2009 Seeing Red: Twelve Tumultuous Years in Welsh Rugby – Alun Carter and Nick Bishop (Mainstream)2010 Confessions of a Rugby Mercenary – John Daniell (Ebury Press)2011 The Grudge – Tom English (Yellow Jersey)2012 Higgy – Alastair Hignell (Bloomsbury)2013 The Final Whistle: The Great War in Fifteen Players – Stephen Cooper (History Press)2014 City Centre – Simon Halliday (Matador)2015 Beyond The Horizon – Richard Parks (Sphere)2016 No Borders: Playing Rugby for Ireland – Tom English (Arena Sport)2017 The Battle – Paul O’Connell (Penguin Ireland)2018 Wrecking Ball – Billy Vunipola (Headline)Sevens Heaven, by Ben Ryan, published by Weidenfeld & Nicolson, £20Ben Ryan’s enthralling snapshot of life with Fiji Sevens came out about a year ago and ironically he was on stage at Lord’s to present the 2018 rugby prize, little knowing that his own book would be nominated this year.The Londoner took charge of the flamboyant Fijians in 2013, shortly after his tenure as England Sevens coach fizzled out disappointingly, and the “three years of enlightenment” that followed in the South Pacific is brought to print with the help of the estimable BBC writer Tom Fordyce.Ryan sheds light on the traditional ways and customs of Fijian life – many of them an impediment to a professional sports environment – and his patience and good sense brings a measure of structure to the chaotic brilliance around him.The result is back-to-back World Series titles and a gold medal in the 2016 Rio Olympics – Fiji’s first Olympic medal of any kind.Interestingly, Ryan delves too into more personal areas of his life, including an agonizing search for a long-lost childhood friend. It’s a book that ticks an awful lot of boxes.The Jersey, by Peter Bills, published by Macmillan, £25Why are the All Blacks, hailing from a nation of fewer than 5m people, so damn good at rugby? Year after year after year.It’s a question Peter Bills wanted to answer and after spending five months travelling round New Zealand, he certainly came up some answers. His splendidly comprehensive examination of the subject starts with the pioneering spirit of the first European settlers in 1839 and takes us right up to the barefoot Beauden Barrett and the team-driven environment currently overseen by Steve Hansen.Some of the reasons given for New Zealand’s global dominance will be familiar to the reader – such as central contracts, coaching standards, and the heavy emphasis on basic skills and attacking intent that pervades every level of the game there.Yet there are many other factors thrown into the pot, with plenty of outside opinion and Bills too getting on his soapbox, happy to criticise as well as laud.The Last Amateurs, by Jonathan Bradley, published by Blackstaff, £9.99Crossing the Irish Sea, we have a terrific offering from Blackstaff Press via the hand of Belfast Telegraph rugby correspondent Jonathan Bradley.Bradley takes us back to the early days of the Heineken Cup when not everyone was fully professional and you could have fledgling full-time rugby pros waiting for part-time team-mates to finish a day’s work at the office, farm or factory floor.Ulster were in just that situation at the start of the 1998-99 season but contrived, under coach Harry Williams, to pull off the competition’s unlikeliest ever triumph.A late interception try here, a missed opposition kick there, everything seemed to fall Ulster’s way. However, they still had to dispatch some mightily impressive French sides – English clubs had boycotted the tournament – to achieve their fairytale. The contenders for Rugby Book of the YearLaunched in 2003, the annual Sports Book Awards showcase the cream of sports writing and publishing. The Best Rugby Book category came on board in 2008 and is judged by a panel of journalists from the Rugby Union Writers’ Club. Two England No 8s of different eras, Andy Ripley and Billy Vunipola, sandwich nine other winners representing outstanding rugby writing from across England, Wales, Scotland and Ireland.This year’s rugby shortlist was announced in Marylebone this week and is drawn from books published in 2018. In attendance were nominee Ian Robertson, past winner Brian Moore and Test referee Wayne Barnes, along with Mick Cleary and Gavin Mairs from the title sponsors. The awards ceremony takes place on 4 June at Lord’s. We sum up the contenders for the Heineken Rugby Book of the Year, listed in alphabetical order…Ivon, by Michael Aylwin, published by Red Door, RRP £8.99Michael Aylwin, who ghosted Richard Parks’s 2015 prize winner about the 737 Challenge, is back with surely the most imaginative book ever to feature on the rugby shortlist.His novel is a futuristic humdinger set in the 22nd century in which sinister forces have made rugby (and other sports) unrecognisable from the game we know and love today.Ivon is the hero of the story, a brilliant young outside-half taken under the wing of a legendary cricketer (Dusty Noble), who is perturbed by the society around him and starts to ask awkward questions of an increasingly nervous state.There is humour, thought-provoking conflicts – notably humanity v science – and even a sprinkling of love interest. It’s like a cross between 1984 and The Hunger Games but with rugby thrown in, and how marvellous that a book that came to fruition because of crowdfunding can jostle with the major publishers at the Sports Book Awards.My Name’5 Doddie Weir: The Autobiography, published by Black & White, £20A fitting addition to the shortlist, not least because Doddie Weir’s foundation – which has raised more than £2m for research into motor neurone disease since its launch 18 months ago – is this year’s charity partner of the Sports Book Awards.The former Scotland lock writes movingly about the chilling and incurable disease that he was diagnosed with just before Christmas 2016. Typical of this much-loved personality, he has always been more concerned of his plight’s impact on others and that comes across in a book that nevertheless oozes gentle humour throughout.Born into farming stock in the Scottish Borders in 1970, Weir went on to experience numerous high points in rugby, including a triumphant Lions tour, a Premiership title with Newcastle and a Scotland Five Nations title, all within a couple of years in the late Nineties.The book brings a first rugby shortlisting for Black & White Publishing, a decade after the back-to-back successes of another Edinburgh publisher, Mainstream (now defunct).Rugby: Talking a Good Game, by Ian Robertson, published by Hodder & Stoughton, £20Ian Robertson never played with Weir but he commentated on him many a time. Then again, whose path didn’t he cross during a near 50-year career working for BBC radio?His autobiography, expertly ghosted by Chris Hewett, is a treasure trove of anecdotes and funny stories. But it’s much more that.The ex-Scotland fly-half offers insights into many of the great broadcasters and sports personalities he encountered, from rugby coaches Ian McGeechan, Jack Rowell and Clive Woodward to media giants like Des Lynam, Peter Bromley and Bill McLaren.He reported on pretty much every major rugby event in the past five decades and his gift of the gab won him friends in high places. Which is why he got invited to lunch by Nelson Mandela, was sent Christmas cards by Elizabeth Taylor and had George Best pulling up a chair to chat to him in a Canberra hotel. The shortlists for the Telegraph Sports Book Awards were announced this week. Rugby World looks at the six contenders for the Heineken Rugby Book of the Year prizecenter_img LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.last_img read more

Paschal janitor connects with high school students

first_imgFacebook Linkedin Grains to grocery: One bread maker brings together farmers and artisans at locally-sourced store ReddIt printCharles “Slick” Williams stands next to Paschal’s panther mascot. (Photo by Saul Perez)The job description for a janitor at R.L. Paschal High School generally includes mopping floors and clearing the cafeteria of lunch trash, but one janitor at the school is also known to students as a mentor and truant officer.Charles “Slick” Williams has been at Paschal for 18 years.During any passing period when students grab snacks and dart between classes, they’ll hear his voice booming in the hallways, “What’s up son! Get on to class now; you’re going to be late. I don’t need you getting in trouble today.”School officials, students and alumni said Williams has dedicated his life to making sure the students at Paschal have somebody they can look up to and lean on for help when they need it.“I see him in the hallway when the tardy bell has rung,” said Stephanie Lewis-Boatner, an administrator at Paschal. “He talks in that military voice, and he’ll say, ‘Sir, what are you doing out here you need to get to class.’ He’s funny, but he’s authoritative and the kids respect him.”Williams grew up in Fort Worth’s Como neighborhood. When he retired from the Navy, he returned and went to work at Paschal.He said being in the Navy molded him as a leader who could inspire others to be leaders.“Most of all, the Navy helped me appreciate every color and nationality in the good ‘ol U.S.A.,” he said. “No matter where you go, you represent your country proudly, and most of all you represent your home-front, your family [and] that last name that God gave you.”Williams said the principal who hired him recognized his leadership and mentorship could benefit students.“I think she liked the way I interviewed,” he said.Lewis-Boatner, an administrator at Paschal for 14 years, said Williams is drawn to students he thinks are on the wrong path in school.“He’s like a father figure,” she said. “He just carries himself that way. Some kids even look for him when they need something. He’s just there for faculty, students and staff.”Moses Gomez, who graduated from Paschal in 2012, said Williams was a mentor for him personally.“There were days when I just wanted to give up on school and just skip class,” Gomez said. “But Slick was always there to keep me going.”Gomez studies at Tarrant County College and works as the accountant clerk and hospitality services coordinator at Bass Hall. While at Paschal, Gomez said he could always count on Williams to encourage students without judging them.“He just genuinely wanted the best for you and wanted you to make something out of your life,” Gomez said.Williams said students named him “Slick” in part because he always manages to be around.“I used to walk up on the students doing something they have no business doing,” Williams said. “One kid said, ‘Man you so slick!’ And from then on, I just told them to call me ‘Slick.’”Williams said students like Gomez motivate him to keep serving the students of Paschal as a leader and mentor.Each year when students graduate, he said he hates to see them go but is proud of them.“My memories of them graduating are the best because they’re on their way, and they have made it to the point where they go on to different universities,” he said. “They are representing their families very well.”Williams said that he plans to spend the rest of his career at Paschal until he retires a couple of years from now.“Knowing me I’ll probably still be doing the same thing: mentoring,” Williams said. “I’ll probably still walk around in different areas and just talk to folks. That’s me; I’m just a people person.” Saul Perez Saul Perezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/saul-perez/ Facebook Saul Perezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/saul-perez/ Linkedin Saul Perezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/saul-perez/ Men’s basketball routs Alabama State Fort Worth set to elect first new mayor in 10 years Saturday Men’s basketball continues win streak + posts Men’s basketball claims Global Sports Classic championship Men’s basketball dominates season opener Saul Perezhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/saul-perez/ ReddIt Twitter Previous articleStudy sanctuaries on campus, in Fort WorthNext articleUpcoming construction on Bluebonnet Circle Saul Perez RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Abortion access threatened as restrictive bills make their way through Texas Legislature Twitterlast_img read more

Conwoman’s remains cremated at private service

first_imgWhatsApp NewsConwoman’s remains cremated at private serviceBy Staff Reporter – June 6, 2015 665 Twitter At the Taste of Ireland awardsAndrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up A CREMATION service has taken place for the serial fraudster found dead in a county Limerick farmhouse last month.The remains of Cecilia Julia McKitterrick, who was more recently known as Julia Holmes, were removed from the Limerick morgue at the University Hospital Limerick on Friday morning last and taken to the Island Crematorium at Ringaskiddy where a small private service took place.The body of the 63-year-old con woman was found lying next to her partner, Thomas Ruttle in the bedroom of the old family farmhouse that had been recently renovated at Booliglass, Askeaton.It is as of yet unknown how long the badly decomposing bodies lay at the farmhouse before the discovery was made on May 18 last and the results of toxicology tests are expected to take a further ten days.However it is understood that the pair died following exposure to carbon monoxide poison in what is believed to have been some form of suicide pact at Boolaglass, Askeaton.McKitterrick, who went by up to 40 other aliases including Julia Holmes, the name she was known locally as, was originally from Castlederg in County Tyrone and had married in her late teens and gave birth to a son before abandoning him at six months.During her life, Holmes became involved with and devisied scams in both the US and Northern Ireland as well as locally in Limerick in her later life.She married twice despite having not divorced from her first husband in the North.Wanted by both the FBI and the PSNI following a number of frauds and convictions, Holmes had also drawn the attention of Gardai in recent months after her activities became known publicly.Following the discovery of the bodies by burglars who thought the farmhouse had been abandoned in recent months, the remains of both Mr Ruttle and the 63-year-old lay in the morgue as a extensive discussions were held over legal issues and subsequent arrangements for burial.Any of the families that the Julia Holmes was involved had not come forward to claim her remains despite her request in a written will and testament that she be buried with her partner Thomas Ruttle.This Wednesday, Thomas Ruttle was laid to rest in the family plot at St Mary’s Church following a service attended by family friends and the late beekeeper’s two sons. Advertisement Facebookcenter_img Linkedin Email Print Previous articleEquality and jobsNext articleTax penalty for Limerick company Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ielast_img read more

GOATS AND GOVERNORS: Flowers pens tell-all novel about his time in government

first_img Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration MESSENGER PHOTO/COURTNEY PATTERSON“Of Goats and Governors, Six Decades of Alabama Political Stories” by Steve Flowers, popular political columnist and commentator, is now available for sale. The book is a guide to Alabama’s colorful political history. Book signings for Flowers will be from 5 until 7 p.m. Sept. 10 at the Johnson Center for the Arts in Troy. Two book signings are set for Sept. 11, from noon until 2 p.m. at the Troy Public Library and from 3 until 5 p.m. at the Tupper Lightfoot Memorial Library in Brundidge.“Of Goats and Governors, Six Decades of Alabama Political Stories” a memoir by popular political columnist and commentator Steve Flowers was released today by New South Books, Inc.Flowers is Alabama’s most watched and read political columnist and commentator. His column on Alabama politics appears weekly in 66 Alabama newspapers, therefore, cultivating fertile ground for his peephole into Alabama’s fascinating political history.“Few states have as fascinating a political history as Alabama, especially in the post-World War II era,” Flowers said. “I was fortunate to have rubbed elbows with some of the most interesting figures in 20th century American government and politics.” By Jaine Treadwell Published 4:00 am Saturday, August 1, 2015 Book Nook to reopen When George C. Wallace was elected to his first term as governor of Alabama, Bassett introduced Flowers as “my little page and best buddy who’s going to follow me in the House.”Fast forward to 1982. At age 30, Flowers was elected to the Alabama House of Representatives and he didn’t just represent Pike County; he represented Wallace’s district as well – quite an honor for the young representative, who became a part of Alabama’s political history,“Alabama has a extremely colorful political history,” Flowers said. “Alabama politics is rich enough that George C. Wallace and ‘Big Jim’ Folsom stories alone could fill a book. Bill Baxley, Howell Heflin, Albert Brewer, Jere Beasley, McDowell Lee, John Patterson, even ‘Shorty’ Price all make for good stories and good reading. And there are a lot of others.”Most of the stories in “Of Goats and Governors” are told from Flowers’ own recollections. Others are retellings of stories that were told to him. Some of the stories were told specifically for the book and some by sons of the governors.Flowers shares stories about Miss Mittie, the little lady who sat in the corner at the State House, not saying much but knowing all that went on all over the capitol building.“She knew everything from how a legislator voted on a bill to what he had for dinner,” Flowers said, laughing.A lot of the stories are about politicians from all across the state but some are straight out of Pike County.“One of the best races in Pike County was the classic race for probate judge in 1958 between Ben Reeves and Gardner Bassett,” Flowers said. “Ben Reeves was unbeatable. He was a political genius. He knew the numbers. He knew where the votes were and who the votes were. He once said he didn’t care what people thought about him as long as he got 51 percent of the votes.”Flowers didn’t skirt round the fact that votes were often bought and sold and how that played into the election process. He talks about campaigning from the “stump” and how entertainers such as Minnie Pearl helped politicians into office. He talks about the times when politicians took to the streets to shake hands and kiss babies all for the sake of a vote.“Those are the bygone days of politics,” he said. “The South has provided the country with the most colorful characters in political history and Alabama has had more than its share. I wrote the memoir because I wanted their stories to be told because they are stories worth telling now and far on down the road. These politicians were a different breed. The old-time politicians are gone but their stories are a huge part of the legacy of the South. They need to be told.”Flowers served in the Alabama House of Representatives from 1982-1998. During his 16-year tenure, he recorded a perfect attendance record. His House colleagues honored him as Outstanding Freshman member in 1982, Most Ethical member in 1988 and Most Outstanding member in 1992.In addition to his weekly column, Flowers serves as the political analyst for the University of Alabama radio and television network. His weekly radio commentary for the university is listened to statewide on Alabama Public Radio. He is also the political analyst for WAKA/the Alabama News Network in Montgomery. Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day But it didn’t just happen that Flowers was at the capitol. He was there as the little buddy of Bassett who had realized his passion for politics and was grooming him for the political arena.“I grew up on Maple Street in Troy and, back then, a lot of prominent men lived on North Three Notch, Orange and Maple Streets,” Flowers said. “Even as young boy I had a keen interest in politics. I guess I was born that way. State Representative Gardner Bassett and Pike County Probate Judge Ben Reeves both realized my passion for politics and took an interest in me.”Flowers said Reeves was his mentor but he and Bassett developed a close personal relationship.“Mr. Gardner would let me go with him down to the Riverside Café on The Square in Troy and listen to men talk politics,” Flowers said. “He’d take me on road trips that had to do with politics. We’d take off in his Chrysler New Yorker and we’d be going down the highway at 70 miles per hour. Curly Long, the state trooper everybody feared, would just wave us on by. That’s when I first realized how important politicians are.” You Might Like CIRCUS FUN: Cirque Millenia brings the ‘Circus of the Future’ to Troy MESSENGER PHOTO/COURTNEY PATTERSONCirque Millennia, “The Circus of the Future,” performed at the Pike County Cattleman’s Complex Thursday night. Families gathered… read more Md: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) Skip GOATS AND GOVERNORS: Flowers pens tell-all novel about his time in government Email the author Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthGet Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Latest Stories Sponsored Content At age 12, Flowers was a page at the Alabama State Capitol for State Rep. Gardner Bassett.“I was standing outside Gov. George C. Wallace’s office with another page andGov. Wallace came out and said, ‘Steve, you and your friend come on and go eat lunch with me,” Flowers said. “Twelve years old and I was having lunch with the governor.” Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Print Article By Blood Sugar Blasterlast_img read more

SAEC sends Strother, Grice to Wasington for summer

first_img Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson You Might Like FULL OF COLOR: CHHS students paint parking spots Christina Lecroy shows off her parking spot at Charles Henderson High School. She painted the spot herself to represent her… read more SAEC sends Strother, Grice to Wasington for summer Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Book Nook to reopen Skip Latest Stories By Jaine Treadwell Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration By Blood Sugar Blaster Email the author “The people in the cities got electricity long before those in the rural areas,” Grice said. “We’ve always had electricity, and it’s hard to imagine not having it.”In Montgomery, the tour group visited the state capitol and met and talked with state legislators.“We talked with some of the legislators about the issues before the legislature,” Grice said. “Two of the issues were the legalization of gay marriages and the UAB football program that had been dropped. It was interesting to hear their views.”The 51st Electric Cooperative Youth Tour in Washington, D.C. included “everything in Washington,” Strother said. Md: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) The purpose of the Electric Cooperative Youth Tour is for the students to learn how the government operates and to see the impact electric cooperatives have on the legislative process.Strother and Grice were first selected to attend the Alabama Electric Cooperatives’ Youth Tour in Montgomery based on the essays they submitted.In researching and writing the essays, they both were impressed by how people in the rural areas worked together to bring electricity to their communities. Print Article Sponsored Content “We went everywhere,” she said. “To the Smithsonian, all the monuments, Mt. Vernon, the U.S. Capitol, Arlington, the National Museum of the Marine Corps, and we had a picture taken in front of the White House. Of all the places we went, the place that impressed me most was Arlington National Cemetery.”Strother said she visited Arlington when she was in ninth grade, “but this time, being there meant more.”Grice was impressed with the guest speakers who were scheduled as part of the tour.“The speakers were all great, but Mike Schlapp was really inspiring,” Grice said. “When he was 12 years old, his friend shot him by accident, and he was paralyzed. He overcame that to become a Gold Medal Olympian in wheelchair basketball.”Strother and Grice said the Youth Tour provided them with opportunities to meet young people from all across the country and to form many lasting friendships.“We took Alabama state pins that were given to us by the Alabama Electric Cooperative and exchanged them with people from just about every state,” Strother said.Even though the students were on a whirlwind, five-day tour of the nation’s capital city, they had down time at the hotel and enjoyed two group dinners and also some dance time.“It was an amazing experience, and I’m so thankful to South Alabama Electric for it,” Strother said.Grice said, he too, appreciated the opportunity to learn more about the way government works and the impact of electric cooperatives in the legislative process.“At the Youth Tour, I made memories that I won’t soon forget,” he said.Strother and Grice said they are looking forward to their senior year with great anticipation and a little sadness.Strother plans to attend Auburn University and pursue a career in sports broadcasting. Grice will attend Troy University to become a college professor of either English or science. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthMost 10 Rarest Skins for FortniteTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Published 3:00 am Wednesday, August 19, 2015 Pike Liberal Arts seniors Elaina Strother and Adam Grice came back from summer vacation having had a unique educational experience thanks to South Alabama Electric Cooperative in Troy.MESSENGER PHOTO/JAINE TREADWELLPike Liberal Arts seniors Elaina Strother and Adam Grice came back from summer vacation having had a unique educational experience thanks to South Alabama Electric Cooperative in Troy.SAEC sent Strother and Grice to Washington, D.C. in June for the 51st Annual Electric Cooperative Youth Tour, and both said it was experience they will long remember and always appreciate.The PLAS seniors joined 45 other students from across Alabama and 1,500 students from across the nation who took part in the summer event.last_img read more

Accounting principles simply won’t work for human capital

first_imgHRconsultant Paul Kearns has accused the Accounting for People Task Force oftrying to measure the impact of people on performance using accountingtechniques.Kearnsis concerned that the methods the taskforce is suggesting to measure humancapital management (HCM) will not work.”Theproblem is that they [the taskforce members] are barking up the wrong tree.They are trying to use accounting principles to measure things that weren’t meantto be measured using those principles.”Thetaskforce’s consultation document does acknowledge that there are realdifferences in opinion over the best way to measure HCM.Itstates: “Some writers place greater weight on factors such as fairtreatment, job security, scope for employee development, and design of jobs topromote autonomy and challenge. Others stress the role of worker flexibility,performance management and the use of incentive payments.”Butit identifies an emerging consensus between leading researchers that there is”compelling evidence for linkage between strong people management andperformance”.HoweverKearns, director at consultancy PWL, is worried the taskforce is usingtechniques that are out of step with the profession.MostHR professionals, he said, aren’t using HCM and are not up to speed with thelanguage and practices.”Thetaskforce is a bit ahead of itself. HR people are doing HR, not HCM,” hesaid.Hesaid he is concerned that the measures are too simplistic and the taskforce’smethodology is questionable. Related posts:No related photos. Accounting principles simply won’t work for human capitalOn 20 May 2003 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. last_img read more