Uber pickup now available at Regina airport

Currently, Capital Cabs is the only taxi company that has a dedicated license allowing it to park at the airport’s front curb for pickups.The airport got rid of commercial licensing fees that cost cab companies $600 a year. Now, cabs or Uber drivers pay $2 per trip when picking up fares at the airport.Unlike some cities, Uber and cab companies operating in Regina do not currently offer flat rates to customers for trips to and from the airport.The Uber news comes as part of a larger project the airport has undertaken to improve ground transportation.This fall, the short-term parking lot will be switching to a gate-less system. Customers will walk up to a parking meter and enter their license plate when paying for parking.In an effort to encourage the City of Regina to consider public transportation to the terminal, the airport has offered to provide $100,000 annually for three years for such a service.In a City of Regina report in June, the administration presented two possible options: A standalone bus route between the downtown and the Regina airport; or expansion of a current route. Both come with pros and cons, including financial implications. The report, which came before a committee meeting, was simply filed at this point since transit service changes would require city council approval as part of its budgeting process.mmelnychuk@postmedia.com BRANDON HARDER / Regina Leader-Post Taxi cabs sit in a line, waiting for fares, at the Regina International Airport. Uber customers are now able to arrange a pickup when they get off their plane at the Regina International Airport.The airport has created a commercial vehicle pickup area in its short-term parking zone across the street from the main terminal that can be used by rideshare services or cab companies. The airport created the area to relieve traffic congestion on its main front curb and to create a more structured system.“We can’t just have everybody use the front curb for everything, otherwise there’s simply not enough room and we want to make sure we keep vehicles flowing,” said James Bogusz, the airport’s president and CEO, in an interview Monday.After Uber launched in the city in May, its drivers could do dropoffs at the airport but not pickups prior to this change. Bogusz said the pickup area is not meant to be a bullpen where drivers can wait for fares. It is strictly meant to be a place where drivers stop to pick up their customers.Cabs will also be able to use the area, and Bogusz said the airport is currently working with cab companies about using the new location.Story continues belowThis advertisement has not loaded yet,but your article continues below. read more

Cenovus taking steps to improve performance at Foster Creek oilsands project

AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email The Cenovus Energy logo is pictured at the company’s annual meeting in Calgary, April 25, 2012.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh by Lauren Krugel, The Canadian Press Posted Feb 13, 2014 5:42 am MDT Cenovus taking steps to improve performance at Foster Creek oilsands project CALGARY – Cenovus Energy Inc. (TSX:CVE) says it’s taking steps to improve performance at its Foster Creek oilsands project, which has been sucking up more steam than the company would like.Foster Creek, in northeastern Alberta, was the first commercial development to use an extraction technique called steam-assisted gravity drainage, or SAGD. Instead of scooping out oilsands ore from an open-pit mine, SAGD operators pump steam underground through one well, and then draw the liquefied crude to the surface through a second well below.At 13 years old, the project is facing some challenges. Steam chambers from each well pair are coalescing, making operations less efficient. Instead of managing steam on a well-by-well basis, Cenovus will now have to consider how heat travels throughout the whole reservoir.“Every SAGD reservoir will encounter this,” CEO Brian Ferguson said in an interview Thursday. “This is a natural evolution.”At Foster Creek, it took Cenovus 2.5 barrels of steam to produce a barrel of crude in 2013, up from a steam-to-oil ratio of 2.2 a year earlier. As well, output from the site dropped eight per cent year-over-year to 53,000 barrels per day.Steam-to-oil ratios, or SORs, are a closely-watched number for SAGD players like Cenovus. The lower the SOR, the lower the cost and environmental impact.Cenovus says Foster Creek is still capable of eventually producing 300,000 barrels of crude per day, but it has decided to shift some timelines and tweak start-up practices to adjust to the reservoir’s changes.Cenovus is planning three 30,000-barrel-per-day expansions to Foster Creek, with steaming on the first expected this spring.“One of the beauties of SAGD is we get smarter every time we bring on a new phase,” said Ferguson.In starting up the new phases, Cenovus will allow steam to circulate underground, heating up the whole length of the wellbore, for a month before producing oil.It’s also adding some instrumentation to track how each well pair is performing.“What we’re doing is making sure that we basically get better information on a real-time basis about how the temperatures and pressures are performing along the horizontal section of the well pair, which will allow us to tweak the amount of steam that we’re seeing and also give us a little bit better indication with respect to the preventative maintenance that we need to do,” said Ferguson.Cenovus is also speeding up additional wells that allow steam to be shifted around the reservoir, as opposed to drilling those just before they’re needed.Foster Creek’s SOR for 2014 is expected to be between 2.6 and three — a temporary increase resulting from the new startup practices.“Cenovus anticipates this will result in long-term production benefits that outweigh the added costs of a temporarily higher SOR,” the company said in a release.Also Thursday, Cenovus announced a 10 per cent hike in its quarterly dividend, starting next month, to 26.6 cents per share.The Calgary-based company also reported $212 million of operating earnings, equal to 28 cents per share. That missed the 36 cents analysts had been expecting, according to estimates compiled by Thomson Reuters, and reversed a year-earlier operating loss of $188 million or 25 cents per share.Its operating earnings exclude a number of items, including the impact of the company’s risk-management programs.With those items included, Cenovus had a fourth-quarter net loss of $58 million or eight cents per share, which was improved from the year-earlier loss of 15 cents per share or $117 million.Combined production from its Foster Creek and Christina Lake oilsands projects rose 14 per cent to average almost 103,000 barrels per day in 2013.Cenovus shares were down three per cent at $28.76 in afternoon trading Thursday on the Toronto Stock Exchange.Follow @LaurenKrugel on Twitter read more