Wheel of Fortune hosts in Providenciales show coming

first_img Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:beaches resort and spa, key west village, pat sajak, vanna white, wheel of fortune Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 11 Nov 2015 – In February next year a very famous game show will spend a week on air in The Turks and Caicos at Beaches Resort Villages and Spa. Turks and Caicos Media will today meet the hosts of Wheel of Fortune: Pat Sajak and Vanna White at the Key West Village to learn more about the family week Wheel of Fortune on the World’s #1 Island, Providenciales. PNP Party says it led wooden pier removal by Beaches Beaches puts former Premier on blast about controversial pier Sandals drops major bomb, makes Misick brothers look terribly suspectlast_img read more

Local pilot killed in small plane crash near San Francisco

first_img Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter April 7, 2018 KUSI Newsroom FALLBROOK (KUSI) — A pilot from San Diego County, and vice commander of the Civil Air Patrol’s Pacific region, was believed to have been killed while flying his small plane in bad weather north of San Francisco, deputies said Saturday.Carl Morrison, 75, was flying his 1990 Mooney M20J propeller-driven plane from Petaluma Municipal Airport to his home field at Fallbrook, north of San Diego, after working Friday as a consultant with the Sonoma County Water Agency, according to a Facebook post from his family.“We are so saddened by the passing of our husband, father, and friend,* the family’s Facebook post read. Morrison had been studying atmospheric rivers, the type of storm that hit the Bay Area Friday, according to the Santa Rose Press-Democrat newspaper.The retired Marine had donated hundreds of hours to searching for lost civilian pilots in the CAP, a volunteer agency.At about 6:40 p.m. Friday, Sonoma County Sheriff’s deputies received a call from the U.S. Air Force that a small plane’s emergency radio beeper was pinging from east of Petaluma, a city about 40 miles north of San Francisco.Deputies rushed to the coordinates, on Sonoma Mountain, but couldn’t immediately locate the plane, Sonoma County Sheriff’s Sgt. Spencer Crum told City News Service.At about the same time, a woman from San Diego County called the Petaluma Police Department to report that her husband was supposed to have left the Petaluma Municipal Airport in his Mooney M20 to head back to Southern California, and was overdue home, Crum said.More than three hours after the initial report, sheriff’s deputies spotted a small fire in a remote ravine near the 3600 block of Manor Lane, outside Petaluma. Deputies hiked to the location and found the downed aircraft and the body of the man believed to be the pilot, Crum said.The National Transportation Safety Board was expected to investigate the crash.According to the Santa Rosa newspaper, Morrison was an attorney and often flew his plane to business meetings around the country.Morrison was a 20-year member of the Marine Corps., retiring as a lawyer and public affairs officer in 1986 in the rank of lieutenant colonel, according to his law office website as quoted by the Press-Democrat. He graduated from Brigham Young University in 1966 before obtaining a law degree from DePaul University in Chicago in 1976, the newspaper reported. KUSI Newsroom, Posted: April 7, 2018 Local pilot killed in small plane crash near San Franciscolast_img read more

POLICE LOG for August 1 Wilmington Man Arrested Injured Baby Skunk Rescued Vandalism

first_imgWILMINGTON, MA — Here are highlights from the Wilmington Police Log for Wednesday, August 1, 2018:Police came across a vehicle running in the parking lot at Michael’s Place on Lowell Street. Two parties stated they had too much to drink and are awaiting a ride from a friend. The vehicle will be staying at this location overnight. (1:01am)Police were out in the Woburn Street area after reports of picketers in the roadway. (7:07am)A passerby reported two turkeys were “stuck together” at West Street and Kilmarnock Street. Animal Control Officer unable to locate. (7:42am)A River Street caller reported her dog caught a baby skunk. Animal Control Officer brought skunk, which was still alive, to Best Pets and then Andover Animal Hospital. (7:46am)A 16-year-old was arrested on a warrant of apprehension (a child requiring assistance warrant) and brought to Lowell Juvenile Court. (8:27am)A Dorchester Street caller reported a squirrel inside their house. (9:04am)A walk-in party reported their debit card was stolen on or about July 30. (2:34pm)Nicholas Evan Belanger (21, Wilmington) was arrested on a warrant. Belanger was arrested at Speedway on Main Street. (4:32pm)A walk-in party reported that on the 129/62 sign by Rotary Park, someone wrote a derogatory term on it. Police notified Mass Highway. (7:06pm)(DISCLAIMER: This information is public information.  An arrest does not constitute a conviction.  Any arrested person is innocent until proven guilty.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip?Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedPOLICE LOG for August 29: Burlington Man Arrested For OUI; Injured HummingbirdIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for August 1: Lowell Woman Arrested For OUI; Billerica Teen Arrested On Warrant; 2 Drivers Issued SummonsesIn “Police Log”POLICE LOG for June 27: Stranger Enters Resident’s House; Man Denies Asking Young Girls To Follow HimIn “Police Log”last_img read more

94pc women face sexual harassment on transport Study

first_imgRapeNinety-four per cent women commuting on public transport in the country have experienced sexual harassment in verbal, physical and other forms, reports UNB quoting a study of development organisation BRAC.The findings of the study titled ‘Roads free from sexual harassment and crash for women’ were disseminated at a programme at the National Press Club in the capital on Tuesday, marking the International Women’s Day that falls on Thursday.A somewhat surprising revelation of the study is that males belonging to relatively older age group of 41-60 years have been identified as the major perpetrators who are responsible for 66 per cent of such incidents.The study also mentioned factors, including lax implementation of law, excessive crowd in buses and weak or no monitoring (such as absence of closed-circuit cameras) as the major causes behind the sexual harassment in roads and public transport, especially in buses.Professor Syed Saad Andaleeb, professor Simeen Mahmud, Fahmida Saadia Rahman and Kabita Chowdhury conducted the research.The research was conducted during a three-month period between April and June, 2017 where a total of 415 women participated in Gazipur, Dhaka and Birulia of Savar upazila in Dhaka district.According to the research, 35 per cent respondents using public transport said they faced sexual harassment from males belonging to the age group of 19-35 years. Around 59 per cent faced such harassment from the males who are 26-40 years old.The forms of sexual harassment experienced by the respondents include deliberate touching of victim’s body with chest and other parts, pinching, standing too close to the victim and pushing, touching victim’s hair, putting hand on their shoulder, touching private parts of the victim.Asked what women do when they are victim of such harassments, 81 per cent women said they kept silent while 79 per cent said they moved away from the place of harassment.It was observed in the study that the present education system in which male and female children attend institutions separately restricts the scope for learning gender equality lessons as well as building the attitude and habit of treating both the sexes equally and with respect. To help children develop such an attitude, adequate training and counselling of teachers and counsellors are essential, it noted.Syed Saad Andaleeb said the pervasive nature of sexual harassment on roads and transport calls for a much larger study that will reflect the nationwide scenario in this regard.Speakers at the event also observed that although commendable progress has been made in the country in terms of women’s education and professional engagement, the feeling of insecurity among women is pervasive.To address the existing issues, they demanded stricter implementation of laws apart from the initiatives to raise public awareness.last_img read more

Heres Whats In The HouseApproved Health Care Bill

first_img Share Pablo Martinez Monsivais/APThe House is voting on the Republican health care bill on Thursday.Republicans approved their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act on Thursday.Here’s a rundown of key provisions in the American Health Care Act and what would happen if the Senate approves them and the bill becomes law.Buying InsuranceThe bill would no longer require people to buy insurance through the marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, if they want to use federal tax credits to buy coverage. It also would eliminate the tax penalty for failing to have health insurance coverage, effectively eliminating that requirement altogether.In place of that mandate, the bill encourages people to maintain coverage by prohibiting insurance companies from cutting them off or charging more for pre-existing conditions for as long as their insurance doesn’t lapse. If coverage is interrupted for more than 63 days, however, insurers can charge people a 30 percent penalty over their premium for one year.Tax CreditsThe House Republican plan would eliminate the income-based tax credits and subsidies available under the Affordable Care Act, replacing them with age-based tax credits ranging from $2,000 a year for people in their 20s to $4,000 a year for those older than 60.That means some people will see their costs go up while others would pay less, depending on your age and where you live. This Kaiser Family Foundation interactive map shows how the change would play out across the country.The map shows that a 27-year-old who makes $30,000 a year would see their costs rise about $2,000 in Nebraska, but fall by about the same amount in Washington. A 60-year-old however, would see costs rise almost everywhere, with increases of almost $20,000 a year in Nebraska.Both Kaiser and the Congressional Budget Office found that on average, older people with lower incomes would be worse off under the Republican plan than under the Affordable Care Act.Tax CutsThe bill eliminates nearly all the taxes that were included in the Affordable Care act to pay for the subsidies that help people buy insurance. Those cuts, which add up to about $592 billion, include a tax on incomes over $200,000 (or $250,000 for a married couple); a tax on health insurers and a limit on how much insurance companies can deduct for executive pay; and a tax on medical-device manufacturers.MedicaidThe AHCA would make dramatic changes to the Medicaid program, which is the federal –state health program for the poor and disabled.The Affordable Care Act allows states to expand eligibility for Medicaid to single, non-disabled adults with incomes slightly above the poverty line, with the federal government picking up most of the cost. That meant single adults who earn up to $15,800 a year could qualify in the 31 states, plus the District of Columbia, that expanded Medicaid. About 10 million people enrolled under that expansion.The Republican plan would gradually roll back that expansion starting in 2019 by cutting the federal reimbursement to states for anyone who leaves the Medicaid rolls. People often cycle in and out of the program as their income fluctuates, so the result would likely be ever-dwindling numbers covered.The House bill also converts Medicaid from an entitlement program where the government pays all the health-related costs for those who qualify, into a grant program. The federal government would give states either a set amount of money for each Medicaid enrollee, or states can choose to receive a fixed-dollar block grant.The Congressional Budget Office estimated in March that the bill would cut Medicaid spending by $880 billion.Pre-Existing ConditionsThe AHCA maintains protections for people with pre-existing conditions, with some important exceptions (see waivers, below). That means that someone with high medical expenses pays the same premium for the same policy as anyone else their age in their area.State WaiversThis section of the bill essentially amounts to an optional, state-level full repeal of Obamacare. It would give states the ability to apply for a waiver that lets them opt out of most of the regulations and consumer protections that were included in the Affordable Care Act.States could apply for waivers that allow insurance companies in their states to do three things: 1) Charge older people more than five times what they charge young people for the same policy; 2) Eliminate required coverage, called essential health benefits including maternity care, mental health and prescription drugs, required under the Affordable Care Act; and 3) Charge more or deny coverage to people who have pre-existing health conditions, such as cancer, diabetes or arthritis.The waivers could also impact people with-employer based insurance, because they would allow insurers to offer policies that have annual and lifetime benefit limits, which are banned under the Affordable Care Act, and some companies may choose those policies for their workers to lower their premiums.States that get waivers would likely see insurance companies offer many more policy options, some with fewer benefits and lower premiums.Those states would be required under the law to create some other way to ensure that people with expensive illnesses are able to get health care, and the law provides up to $138 billion over 10 years for such programs, typically called high-risk pools.However, an analysis released Thursday by the consulting form Avalere concludes that that amount would be inadequate to provide full health coverage for the number of people who now buy insurance in the individual market and have medical problems.Overall ImpactThe House approved the bill Thursday without a full analysis by the Congressional Budget Office of its costs and how many people would be covered.The CBO report from March concluded that over 10 years, 24 million fewer people would be covered under the bill who otherwise would have had insurance under current law.That analysis also predicted that the House bill would cut the federal deficit by $337 billion over those same 10 years.However, changes to the bill since then would allow states to accept block grants for Medicaid; add about $38 billion for high-risk pools and maternity and childbirth care; and offer states waivers from regulations created by the Affordable Care Act. It’s unclear how much these changes would affect the original CBO score.last_img read more