USL DIVISION ONE: BONAGEE UNITED 3, DRUMKEEN UNITED 1

first_imgThis game was slow to liven up in the searing heat. The only noticeable chances early on were a shot from Drumkeen’s Eunan Doherty after a good step over from Ray Sweeney and Glenn Rainey firing over at the back post for Bonagee.The game sprung to life on the 30th minute when Drumkeen went ahead, when a cross from the right wing by Lee Guthrie was controlled and finished very well by Lee Mc Monagle.Five minutes later Ryan Gildea advanced from central midfield and fired inches over the bar from 19 yards. As half time approached Bonagee had a couple off half chances, Glenn Rainey shot wide from Gavin Mc Brearty’s cross and Ciaran Gibson had an effort well saved by keeper Michael Gibson. Bonagee came out for the second half in a more determied mood and levelled the scores after just 5 minutes when Ciaran Gibson’s bullet header from Joe Mc Carron’s superb cross gave Michael Gibson no chance at all. They went further ahead on 66 minutes when Stephen Keys started a fine move in midfield involving Ross Hamlyn, Ciaran Gibson’ and Paddy Mc Laughlin and he was on hand at the back post to finish the move off himself. A minute later they made it 3-1 when Ryan Tyrell’s superb through ball was finished very well by Ciaran Gibson.Bonagee were now dominating the game but, Lee Mc Monagle fired wide from the edge off the 18 yard box for Drumkeen. Michael Gibson did well in the Drumkeen goals to keep a curling effort from brother Ciaran out and smother a one on one with Ned Gibson. The hot conditions were taking their toll as the pace off the game slowed down compared to the early part off the half. Drumkeen had a dangerous cross from Raymond Sweeney on the right wing cleared away by Paddy O’ Loan on the 86th minute and in the final minute Bonagee keeper Roy Duffy made a fingertip save from a good header from Gerard Bonner.At this referee Paul Duddy who had an excellent game blew the final whistle.Final score Bonagee Utd 3 Drumkeen Utd 1  USL DIVISION ONE: BONAGEE UNITED 3, DRUMKEEN UNITED 1 was last modified: June 10th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DRUMKEEN UNITED 1USL DIVISION ONE: BONAGEE UNITED 3last_img read more

Travel Alert: Roads blocked by flooding in East Donegal

first_imgUPDATE: 10.40pm: Donegal County Council has issued a notice that the R265 between Rossgier and Porthall is now passable with care.Heavy flooding has been reported on a number of roads in East Donegal this Sunday night. Downpours have caused both the Rossgier to St Johnston road and Ballinalecky to St Johnston routes to be impassable. Flooding has also been reported on other routes in the area, including those between Ballybofey and Strabane.Emergency service workers with Donegal County Council are on the scene.Motorists are being advised to exercise extreme caution.A Status Yellow rainfall warning is in place for Donegal, Cavan and Leitrim as heavy rain is set to continue for a time tonight, bringing further risks of spot flooding. The weather alert is in place until midnight. The AA Roadwatch is warning motorists to: “Only drive through surface water if you know it’s not too deep for your vehicle.”Travel Alert: Roads blocked by flooding in East Donegal was last modified: September 23rd, 2019 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:FLOODINGlast_img read more

Bacterial Flagellum Reveals New Structural Complexity

first_imgThe bacterial flagellum, the unofficial mascot of the Intelligent Design movement, got more praise from the evolutionary journal Nature this week: Samatey et al.1 analyzed the hook region in detail and found that it is composed of 120 copies of a specialized protein that “reveals the intricate molecular interactions and a plausible switching mechanism for the hook to be flexible in bending but rigid against twisting for its universal joint function.”    Christopher Surridge, commenting on this paper in the same issue,2 adds that this joint must be able to bend up to 90 degrees in a millisecond or less while rotating at up to 300 times per second.  He says that the researchers describe “how they determined the atomic structure of this super-flexible universal joint, and thereby how it achieves such a feat of engineering.”1Samatey et al., “Structure of the bacterial flagellar hook and implication for the molecular universal joint mechanism,” Nature 431, 1062 – 1068 (28 October 2004); doi:10.1038/nature02997.2Christopher Surridge, “Molecular motors: Smooth coupling in Salmonella,” Nature 431, 1047 (28 October 2004); doi:10.1038/4311047b.The hook region surely appeared to be one of the simplest-looking parts of the complex molecular motor.  Now, even that little item, something that just bends at an angle, is shown to be exquisitely designed, with exacting specifications to allow bending without twisting.  If all the amino acids in this one protein element were not in the right places, the protein would not work.  And if all 120 were not joined together, and were not assembled at the right time and in the right place, the flagellum would be useless.  Inside that hook is an entire highway of molecular trucks that build the propeller (see 06/14/2004 headline).  No wonder Jonathan Wells remarked, “What we find is irreducible complexity all the way down.”(Visited 7 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

“It Evolved” Is Not an Explanation

first_imgA Darwinian can stare at evidence for intelligent design all day and conclude, without batting an eye, “evolution did it.” Look at these examples.A favorite attack by atheists is to accuse creationists of giving up on science, and just saying, “God did it.” That attack cuts both ways. Saying “It evolved” gives up on science even more, as the following news items demonstrate.The clownfish is unaffected by the stinging cells of a sea anemone (Corel Pro Photos)The sea anemone, an animal that hides its complexity well (Science Daily). Observe this opening paragraph. It sounds like a tribute to wise design until the last sentence.Despite its apparent simplicity — a tube-like body topped with tentacles -, the sea anemone is actually a highly complex creature. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with the CNRS, have just discovered over a hundred different cell types in this small marine invertebrate as well as incredible neuronal diversity. This surprising complexity was revealed when the researchers built a real cell atlas of the animal. Their findings, which will add to discussions on how cells have diversified and developed into organs during evolution, have been published in the journal Cell.It must be understood that, in Darwinese, the verb developed is often used as a synonym for evolved. The assumption of mindless, unguided innovation of “organs” is buried within the word, making this rhetorical tactic a form of obfuscation or equivocation. With that in mind, look at the surprise they found in the humble sea anemone:The sea anemone Nematostella vectensis … is a small marine invertebrate that is easy to keep in the laboratory and whose genome is simple enough to study its workings and close enough to that of humans for conclusions to be drawn. “When the sea anemone genome was sequenced in 2007, scientists discovered that it was very similar to the human genome, both in terms of the number of genes (roughly 20,000) and its organization, explains Heather Marlow, a specialist in developmental biology in the (Epi)genomics of Animal Development Unit at the Institut Pasteur and the main author of this study. These similarities make the sea anemone an ideal model for studying the animal genome and understanding interactions existing between genes.” It also has another advantage — its strategic position in the tree of life. The cnidaria branch that anemones belong to separated from the bilateria branch, in other words from most other animals, including humans, over 600 million years ago. “The anemone can therefore also help us to understand the origin and evolution of the multiple cell types making up the bodies and organs of animals, and particularly their nervous systems,” sums up Heather Marlow.Superman could hardly leap over taller buildings in a single bound. As many genes as a human? Organized in a similar way? 100 cell types, coordinated in an animal body plan complete with a nervous system? Cnidarians, which include jellyfish, anemones and corals, appear for certain in the Cambrian Explosion. Claims of Precambrian cnidarians depend on indirect evidence, such as trace fossils or ‘molecular clock’ dating methods. Cnidarians are very different from sponges and ctenophores, the other Darwinian candidates for earliest animal. To assume that a sea anemone “evolved” without saying how all its cell types appeared in the same creature is equivalent to believing in a miracle. Then add the twenty or so other animal body plans that “developed” at the same time, and it becomes clear that saying “it evolved” amounts to fogma, not understanding.Off/on switch for DNA repair protein (Science Daily). DNA repair is a complex operation involving numerous sophisticated proteins and processes that must work together. The BAD act [Bluffing Assertion of Darwinism] is right in the first sentence in this article: “Damage to DNA is a daily occurrence but one that human cells have evolved to manage.” It’s equivalent to saying that power line repairmen or fire departments appeared by random, blind processes. A repair operation needs to recognize a fault and have the tools and instructions to fix it. If an atheist were to be offended by the explanation, “God did it,” would the answer “Chance did it” represent an improvement? We know that intelligence can create repair systems. Where has chance ever done that?Competitive team sports shaped the physical and psychological skills of early humans (Science Daily). Another science dilly comes from the University of Oregon, where Darwinists tell a quite typical just-so story:Competitive team games in which men test their mettle against others are universal across the world, and may have deep roots in our evolutionary past. Among hunter-gatherers, these games enable men to hone their physical skills and stamina, assess the commitment of their team members, and see how each performs under pressure. All these activities suggest motivation to practise skills involved in lethal raiding, says Michelle Scalise Sugiyama of the University of Oregon in the US, lead author of a study in Springer’s journal Human Nature.Play behavior in humans and other animals is thought to have evolved as a way to develop, rehearse, and refine skills that are critical for survival or reproduction. Chase games, for instance, build stamina and speed, which is helpful for evading predators. Similarly, play fighting is believed to develop skills used in actual fighting. Although many animals play fight, only people do so in teams. The study’s findings suggest that team play fighting is not a recent invention of agricultural societies.This may sound plausible until you think about it. All kinds of questions present themselves. Why did games enable men to hone their skills? What about women’s sports? Why are people different from all other animals? Why didn’t human ancestors just climb higher in the trees or go deeper in caves? Did the NFL and NBA evolve by natural selection? If that is the explanation, what gene mutated in a pre-sport ancestor? Are sportsmen the only ones who pass on their genes? Perceptive readers will notice the reporter’s high perhapsimaybecouldness index and use of Tontological statements, like “is thought to have evolved” and “is believed to develop skills.” Who would have thought of such things, much less believed them? Answer: lazy Darwinians. Glia and axons: A match made in evolution (Medical Xpress). If you want to learn about a cell type that defies evolution, consider the neuron. Lined with rapid-firing ion channels that convey electrical currents down its dendrites and axons, then converts them to chemical neurotransmitters across synapses using complicated packaging processes – and does this lighting fast (consider how quickly your brain learns you stubbed your toe) – the neuron is a marvel of complexity superior to human technology. Plus, it grows from an information code in the genome, and can make copies of itself. And yet this article audaciously gives all the credit to Darwin, saying, “The larger size of axons in adult lamprey compared to the larval stage may enable rapid signal transmission, suggesting that myelin may have evolved to achieve similarly fast neuronal communication in the much smaller axons of jawed vertebrates.” Understand that the evolutionists here are not just suggesting that myelin evolved as an improvement on a created design; to them, the whole shebang evolved from bottom up, just the way the cnidarian “evolved” a nervous system. Like Lewontin remarked, they must not let a Divine foot in the door.How evolution builds the most efficient airfoils (Phys.org). Chris Packham, still angry at fellow humans for causing extinctions (see 9 July 2018), shows his true colors as a Darwin storyteller. Many not yet inebrieted by Darwine can look to birds as marvels of design. Given the demands of overcoming gravity with powered flight, considering all the systems that must contribute to that function (as told in Illustra’s film Flight: The Genius of Birds), powered flight would seem to many to represent an all-or-nothing challenge to Darwinism. Enter the unfeigned faith of the moyboy evolutionist: “Over millions of years, the morphology of these animals evolved for maximally efficient cruising,” Packham yarns. Later, he BAD-ly asserts, “the animals selected as the fittest have evolved to a narrow range of highly efficient parameters.” In fact, he points out, fish and birds have arrived at nearly the best trade-off between competing constraints. Evolution News sees optimization theory as a branch of intelligent design science in action. Packham just throws up his hands and assumes, “It evolved.”Creation and evolution appear to be at a standoff: “God did it” vs “It evolved.” But consider: creation has a cause – intelligence – that is well known to be necessary and sufficient for organizing material into complex systems. What does evolution have? Chance (the Stuff Happens Law). That is the denial of causality.But is creation a “science stopper,” as evolutionists often allege? That argument cuts both ways, too: “It evolved” is a lazy way out of scientific explanation. Actually, belief in creation has a long history of stimulating excellent science (see our Biographies). They may believe in God as Creator as a final cause, but are often eager to learn how things work, and how God did it. Do evolutionists give the same diligence to explaining how chance made complex systems ‘arise’ or ‘develop’ or ’emerge’? (Pick your favorite euphemism for Stuff Happens.) Once you attribute the origin of something to sheer dumb luck, there’s not much more to say.What’s good for the goose is good for the gander. If “God did it” is too simplistic for an evolutionist, “It evolved” is too simplistic for a creationist. Don’t let the Darwinians pretend to have a superior explanation for the origin of complex systems. When they discuss the origin of a complex phenomenon and take the lazy way out (assuming evolution in a BAD way), press them for details, using their own theory. What gene mutated? What did it do? When did it happen? How did the gene spread through the population? (See the article on population genetics by Sanford and Basener, 22 Dec 2017). How frequently do beneficial mutations happen relative to neutral and harmful mutations? Are there enough beneficials to overcome the downward spiral of genetic entropy? Did the mutation have any deleterious pleiotropic effects? Were coordinated mutations required? How long would that take? (see Living Waters conclusion). Have you calculated the probability? Is there enough time in the universe for that to occur? Do 747’s evolve from tornadoes in junkyards? Pile it on till they cry uncle and admit, “I have no idea. I just take Darwin on faith.”Illustration by J. Beverly Greene for CEH. (Visited 1,012 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Nal’ibali searches across South Africa for its Story Bosso

first_imgNal’ibali is a national reading-for-enjoyment campaign. (Image: Nal’ibali)Nal’ibali invited all South Africans, young and old, to tell their favourite family-friendly story in their home languages and now has a shortlist for its Story Bosso storytelling competition.A national reading-for-enjoyment campaign, Nal’ibali has been running the competition since September and received over 2 000 entries from a full-cross section of South African society. These have been whittled down to just 15 candidates.Story Bosso has been designed as a nationwide talent search to excite people about reading and telling stories. It identifies undiscovered storytellers across the country and connects members of the public with a range of South African stories as well as tips and ideas on how to become better storytellers.It also favours the avid reader as people can access and enjoy all 15 shortlisted stories in the form of audio and video clips on the Nal’ibali website during November.These include original stories, retold stories and stories that have been read aloud by some of South Africa’s most animated storytellers between the ages of five and 51.“As people living in South Africa, we have a deep history of storytelling which reflects our diversity and our common cultural heritage. And, reading and storytelling are, of course, keys that unlock children’s literacy learning potential,” said Carole Bloch, the executive director of The Project for the Study of Alternative Education in South Africa, which drives the Nal’ibali campaign.Celebrity judges will help Nal’ibali literacy activists decide South Africa’s first Story Bosso and two runners-up.The judges include: actress and writer Lebogang Mashile; author and retired teacher Sindiwe Magona; social activist and writer Shaka Sisulu; comedian and author Nik Rabinowitz; actress and author Bonnie Henna; children’s author Alan Glass; new-age performance poet and singer Busiswa; and, TV presenter and radio personality Elana Afrika.The winner will be announced on 30 November and will – along with the title Story Bosso – take home a R5 000 cash prize, a R1 000 Ackermans voucher and a home library courtesy of Bargain Books, Exclusive Books and local publishers. The winner will also receive a visit from one of the celebrity judges.The runners-up will each receive R2 500 in cash, a R500 Ackermans voucher and a home library.THE SHORTLISTThe contenders for the title of Story Bosso are:Lisa Gebe: Story title: The Lion and the Mouse. Category: Read aloud. Language: English. Age: 11Chiara Dover: Story title: Probleme in die Droombos. Category: Read aloud. Language: Afrikaans. Age: 9Atang Makgata: Story title: A Dream about the Enchanted Forest. Category: Original. Language: English. Age: 12Busisiwe Smith: Story title: Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Category: Retelling. Language: isiZulu. Age: 30Edith Makola: Story title: Goldilocks and the Three Bears. Category: Retelling. Language: EnglishOlwethu Peter: Story title: The Hyena and the Seven Little Kids. Category: Read aloud. Language: isiXhosa. Age: 9Sihle Mncwabe: Story title: Everything is Rosy. Category: Read aloud. Language: EnglishNozipho Tshabalala: Story title: The Lion and the Mouse. Category: Retelling. Language: isiZulu. Age: 5Athandiwe Skade: Story title: Umboleki. Category: Retelling. Language: isiXhosa. Age: 7Kholeka Gwendolien Nojilawa: Story title: The Granny with her Grandchildren Living in the Big Forest. Category: Retelling. Language: isiXhosa. Age: 51Nyameka Combi: Story title: Lisa’s First Day at Harare Library. Category: Original. Language: isiXhosa. Age: 33The Bright Sparks Dancing Pencils Writing Club (team entry): Story title: The Golden Thread by Aaliyah Monga (club member). Category: Read aloud. Language: EnglishKerrin Kokot and Jayne Batzofin (team entry): Story title: The Lonely Frog. Category: Original. Language: English and Sign. Age: 33 and 31Funeka Soga: Story title: Lucy Learns her ABCs. Category: Original. Language: English Age: 24Horacio Ngovene: Story title: The Lion and the Little Mouse. Category: Re-telling. Language: English. Age: 21last_img read more

ODA pesticide disposal

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Department of Agriculture will be sponsoring a collection for farmers wishing to dispose of unwanted pesticides on Aug. 23 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at the Guernsey County Fairgrounds, 335 Old National Road, Old Washington, OH 43768.The pesticide collection and disposal service is free of charge, but only farm chemicals will be accepted.  Paint, antifreeze, solvents, and household or non-farm pesticides will not be accepted.Pesticide collections are sponsored by the department in conjunction with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.  To pre-register, or for more information, contact the Ohio Department of Agriculture at 614-728-6987.last_img read more

DS Kulkarni scam: Pune police arrest top Bank of Maharashtra officials

first_imgIn a simultaneous crackdown across different cities, the Pune police on Wednesday arrested six persons, including Ravindra Marathe, the CEO and MD of Bank of Maharashtra (BoM) and the bank’s former CMD Sushil Muhnot, in connection with the ₹2000-crore D.S. Kulkarni fraud case.Mr. Marathe was arrested from Pune and Mr. Muhnot was picked up from Jaipur for advancing loans to the fraud-accused realtor in alleged violation of banking norms.Besides them, the Economic and Offences Wing (EOW) teams arrested Rajendra Gupta, executive director, BoM, Sunil Ghatpande, D.S. Kulkarni’s chartered accountant and Rajeev Newaskar, vice-president, engineering department, DSK Developers Ltd (DSKDL) from Pune, and Nityanand Deshpande, zonal manager, BoM from Ahmedabad.The accused have been booked under sections 120 B (criminal conspiracy), 406 (criminal breach of trust), 409 (Criminal breach of trust by public servant, banker, merchant or agent), 420 (cheating), 465 (forgery) and other relevant sections of the Indian Penal Code and the Prevention of Corruption Act, said Sudhir Hiremath, Deputy Commissioner of Police, EOW.Mr. Kulkarni, a prominent city-based developer known as ‘DSK’, and his wife Hemanti, are accused of defrauding thousands of investors across Pune, Mumbai and Kolhapur. Both of them are presently lodged in the city’s Yerwada Central Jail.“It appears that the bank officials colluded with DSKDL by sanctioning loans illegally and misusing their positions of authority to disburse credit in the garb of loan in flagrant violation of Reserve Bank of India (RBI) guidelines,” said an EOW official. RTI activist Vijay Kumbhar, who has been spearheading the fight against the developer on behalf of investors, called for the nexus between banks and DSK to be thoroughly probed.“BOM advanced loans to the developer [D. S. Kulkarni] despite the latter furnishing improper documentation. The end use of the loan was never checked. One such loan was sanctioned under the phoney rubric ‘to meet temporary mismatch in cash flows’,” said Mr. Kumbhar.“It is unfortunate that banks, which are otherwise fastidious about advancing loans to ordinary customers, should willfully flout norms while advancing loans to privileged customers like DSK,” he further said.Earlier this week, the Supreme Court rejected the interim bail plea of Mr. Kulkarni’s son, Shirish.Shirish Kulkarni, who was an executive director at (DSKDL) and a director in other partnership firms, has been charged with divesting depositors’ money for other purposes.Last month, the police arrested Mr. Kulkarni’s kin, including Kedar Vanjape, the son-in-law of Mr. Kulkarni’s brother and his wife Sai Vanjape.On 17 May, the EOW submitted a 36, 875-page charge sheet before a special court in Pune, pegging the scam committed by the DSK Group at ₹2,043 crore.Assets attachedIn May this year, the Maharashtra government had issued a notification directing authorities to attach 124 properties, 276 bank accounts and 46 vehicles belonging to the DSK Group on grounds of protecting the interests of the investors as Mr. Kulkarni was “unlikely to return their deposits.”In April, a special court for Maharashtra Protection of Interest of Depositors (MPID) Act had rejected the regular bail applications of Mr. Kulkarni and his wife considering the magnitude of the multi-crore scam.Arguing against bail, Public Prosecutor Praveen Chavan had submitted that the scope Mr. Kulkarni’s scam went far beyond defrauding depositors and homebuyers and noted that despite the DSK group’s parlous financial condition since 2015, the conglomerate continued to collect deposits and beguile homebuyers by presenting a wrong picture of its financial health.The DSK group had raised ₹2,892 crore in bank loans against his pending projects, ₹1,153 crore from the depositors and ₹470 crore from homebuyers among other borrowings without possessing the wherewithal to repay this massive credit.At least five FIRs across Pune, Mumbai and Kolhapur have been lodged against the developer and his family since October 28 last year, with more than 3,000 investors filing cheating complaints against Mr. Kulkarni.More than 8,000 persons, a majority of them senior citizens, are said to have invested in the DSK group’s fixed deposit (FD) scheme.The builder and his wife were finally arrested on February 17 after being detained by a team of the Economic Offences Wing (EOW) of the Pune police in New Delhi and brought back to the city.last_img read more