GAO urges more scrutiny of antibiotic use in animals

first_imgJun 3, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – The General Accounting Office (GAO) has urged federal agencies to step up their efforts to determine if the use of certain antibiotics in animals endangers human health by making bacteria resistant to those antibiotics. However, the GAO said, the approved drugs reviewed so far are not the ones the FDA considers critically important to human health, and the reviews have taken at least 2 years to complete. “Therefore it may be some time before FDA completes its reviews of critically important drugs in order to determine if enforcement action to protect human health is warranted,” the report says. The agency recommends that the FDA accelerate its reviews of antibiotics that are used in animals and are important for human health. GAO report “Antibiotic Resistance: Federal Agencies Need to Better Focus Efforts to Address Risk to Humans from Antibiotic Use in Animals”http://www.gao.gov/new.items/d04490.pdf The report also notes that the FDA has moved to bar the use of the fluoroquinoline antibiotic enrofloxacin in poultry because of evidence that fluoroquinoline use in animals has caused the transfer of resistant pathogens to humans. However, the drug has remained on the market the past 3 years because the manufacturer has challenged the FDA move. Concerning the need for data, the GAO says federal agencies have expanded their research on antibiotic resistance related to antibiotic use in animals, but it is too early to judge the effectiveness of their efforts to reduce the risk to human health. The FDA, CDC, and USDA have increased their surveillance and research on antibiotic resistance in animals and humans in recent years. The GAO, Congress’s investigative arm, spent a year preparing the report. It was requested by three senators—Olympia J. Snowe, R-Me.; Tom Harkin, D-Iowa; and Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass. In addition, the GAO said research on the human health risk is crippled by a lack of data on the types and amounts of antibiotics used in animals. The agency recommended that the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) work together to collect the needed information. The USDA and HHS, on reviewing a draft of the GAO report, generally agreed with it, the GAO says. HHS officials said that pharmaceutical companies have the most useful data on antibiotic use in animals. Current regulations would have to be revised to put the data that companies have to report to the FDA in a more useful format for research on antibiotic resistance, the officials said. Mar 18, 2004, CIDRAP News story, “FDA closer to banning enrofloxacin use in poultry” In a report released last week, the GAO said the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) should speed up its risk assessments to determine whether it should restrict the use in animals of antibiotics considered critically important to human health.center_img “Although they have made some progress in monitoring antibiotic resistance, federal agencies do not collect the critical data on antibiotic use in animals that they need to support research on the human health risk,” the report states. In Denmark, collection of detailed data on antibiotics given to animals has enabled scientists to trace the effects on resistant bacteria in humans and to devise strategies to minimize the health risks, the GAO says. The agency recommends that the FDA and USDA together develop and implement a plan to collect the needed data. The report acknowledges that this will cost money but says it should not be excessively expensive, because existing FDA and USDA programs can provide a framework that can be expanded to begin gathering the information. However, the FDA “is not collecting data on antibiotic use in animals, and USDA’s data collection activities are limited to a few swine farms,” the report says. It suggests that the agencies gather information on the types and quantities of antibiotics sold for animals, the purpose of their use (disease treatment or growth promotion), and the species in which they are used. Many studies suggest that the use of antibiotics in animals poses risks to human health, but a few studies indicate that the health risks are minimal, the report says. The document notes that the FDA has laid out a “risk assessment framework” determining the human health risks. The agency is using the framework in reviewing both currently approved animal antibiotics and manufacturers’ applications for approval of new ones. See also: The United States differs from some of its key trading partners in the use of antibiotics in food animals, the report notes. While the United States and Canada allow some drugs that are important in human medicine to be used for growth promotion, the European Union and New Zealand have banned this practice. In addition, the EU plans to ban the use of any antibiotic for growth promotion by 2006. These policy differences have not significantly affected US meat exports so far, but that could change, the report says. The agency concluded that antibiotic-resistant bacteria have been transferred from animals to humans and that this transfer appears to pose significant risks to human health. Some studies have produced evidence of links between changes in antibiotic use in animals and bacterial resistance to antibiotics in humans. Further, genetic studies of bacteria have established that antibiotic-resistant Campylobacter and Salmonella are transferred from animals to humans, the report says.last_img read more

Women’s quarter finals day at Wimbledon

first_imgThe pair were involved in an enthralling last-16 contest last night that had to be suspended due to bad light.Djokovic had fought back from two sets to love behind to level the match on two sets apiece when the two players were called off the court.It’s also Women’s quarter-final day at Wimbledon with top seed Serena Williams up against Victoria Azarenka. Maria Sharapova aims to reach the quarter-finals of Wimbledon for the first time since 2011.The 2004 champion faces American Coco Vandeweghe who’s already knocked three seeds out of the tournament.last_img read more

Dietra Sober is your Duchess of 2015

first_imgDietra Sober with escort Wesley Gilmore. (Eric Rinehart photo)by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Dietra Sober spent Friday trying to get into the Class 4A State Tennis tournament. She has yet to qualify. That will be determined this morning. But she did secure one other victory. She became the Duchess of Wellington for 2015.Sober was voted by her peers as the Duchess of the Wellington High School Homecoming with Madison Adams, Ryleigh Buck, Baylee DeJarnett and Alexis Hinman as her attendants.It was a strange dynamic this year as Buck was not in attendance because she was at the University of Central Florida on a recruiting trip for girls softball. Sober and Adams were both playing in the Class 4A Regional tennis tournament in Pratt Friday and today. It was as if the Duchess ceremony was sandwiched in between this and that.Nevertheless, Sober received the crown. She is the daughter of Patti Sober and Ty Sober. Dietra’s in school activities include: tennis, power lifting, track, Scholar’s Bowl, Business of Professional of America, student council, President of National Honors Society, Business Professionals of America, setting school records in track, top 10 KU honoree, Lions Club Award, receiving best supporting actress for 2014-15 and going to nationals for BPA. Sober’s future plans are to travel and experience the world while changing the lives of others. Her escort was Wesley Gilmore.See the full Duchess Candidates photo gallery by Eric Rinehart here.Follow us on Twitter. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (3) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. +3 Vote up Vote down Local · 252 weeks ago Congratulations Dietra! Report Reply 0 replies · active 252 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Karen Rowe · 252 weeks ago Congratulations! Report Reply 0 replies · active 252 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Glenda Wright · 252 weeks ago Congratulations, Dietra! We are so proud of you! Report Reply 0 replies · active 252 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more