Champs Windward Road make early move at INSPORTS Junior High Championships

first_imgDefending champions Windward Road Primary and Junior High lead the overall points standing after five finals on day one of the Institute of Sports (INSPORTS) Junior High School Athletics Championship at Stadium East yesterday.Windward Road also lead the girls’ section with 35 points, while John Mills are in front in the male category on 17.50 points.The Oral Whilby-coached Windward Road won two finals yesterday to accumulate 52.50 points and lead ahead of main rivals John Mills, who won one final and have amassed 47.50.Whilby described the day as a very good one, noting that his team exceeded expectations after winning two five finals.Michaelia Wilson took the girls’ Class One high jump with a leap of 1.54 metres, while Kishuana Smith took the girls’ shot put open with a throw of 9.63 metres. They also took silver in the Class Two girls’ high jump and Class Three boys’ long jump.Calabar’s Kevin Smith won the boys’ Class Two high jump with 1.69 metres and Braeton’s Mickel Wilson won the Class Three long jump with 5.05 metres.”We had some good results and some valuable points are on the board, so it was a fairly decent first day,” said Whilby. “Tomorrow (today), we anticipate another good day; there will be 21 finals, and we expect to be out front again tomorrow.”They (John Mills) are in many finals, and we are also in most finals with two athletes, so it’s going to be a straight shoot-out between us and John Mills and may the best man win,” he stated.John Mills’ only finals success on the day came from Shella Hamber (4.32m) in the Class Three girls long jumpHowever, coach Ransford Spalding was pleased with his team’s performance on the opening day.”All in all, I am satisfied with the performance of my team; we are just four points behind and they are giving a good account of themselves,” he said.Twenty-one finals are scheduled for today’s second day, with the first event set to begin at 9 a.m.last_img read more

Rescuing Dinosaur Soft Tissue from the Ravages of Time

first_imgThe reaction of scientists to irrefutable evidence for soft tissue in dinosaur bone sounds all too human: ignore, rant, rationalize; repeat.Blogger Jon Tennant, a grad student at Imperial College London studying vertebrate macroevolution, believes in ghosts.  His recent post, “How do the chemical ghosts of dinosaurs help their preservation?”, abridged on The Conversation, tries to keep soft tissue old in dinosaur bones by building on Mary Schweitzer’s recent work suggesting that iron atoms from heme molecules hold onto the delicate remains, keeping them intact for millions of years.  Does it work?  He knows it’s a stretch:Life as we know it is carbon-based, that is, organic. These organic molecules containing mostly carbon and hydrogen are delicate to the ravages of time, relatively speaking. They aren’t usually preserved in fossils that paleontologists unearth to tell the story of our planet’s past. For them, it is vital information lost forever.It should be lost forever, that is, if the bones are tens of millions of years old.  But it’s not.  That’s the problem.  Schweitzer’s work turned up “structures resembling blood vessels and even the residue of proteins.”  What is his answer?  A fairy tale:… Schweitzer shows that, during the process preservation, the conditions can often be “just right” to save tissues – the ‘Goldilocks effect’. This process that she calls “tissue fixation” may help paleontologists look at molecular remains that may hold important clues about these beasts. Borrowing a host of analytical tools from Earth and environmental sciences, Schweitzer shows it may be possible to observe the “chemical ghosts” remaining in fossils, and how these have helped to exquisitely preserve molecular structures.One should not confuse cute phrases, like those in quote marks above, with explanation.  (Q. “How did soft tissues survive for 70 million years?”  A. “Tissue fixation.”)  It’s also suspect in science to invoke special conditions, like a “Goldlilocks effect.”  For the explanation, Tennant offers nothing new; he just borrows Schweitzer’s hypothesis that iron preserved the blood and osteocytes preferentially.  He knows this is also a stretch:Only a decade ago, this hypothesis would have been laughed at by fellow scientists. While many still remain unconvinced, there is growing evidence that molecular tissues may actually have been preserved. Now the question is: how much have palaeontologists missed by not considering these potentially high levels of preservation in dinosaurs? And how much is there that is still left to be found at such levels of detail?In his lengthier blog entry, Tennant reveals the reaction of fellow scientists to the news about dinosaur soft tissue.  It sounds all too human:Naturally, her research has been met with a whole wad of stiff resistance from the scientific community, seemingly for no other reason than “We don’t like the sound of that..”. Scientific rigour ftw!(We refuse to translate the acronym, but it means the scientific community was very bothered by the news.)   He adds to the laughter claim: it’s “something that 10 years ago would have been laughed out of the room, and still is by many.”  For himself, though, he finds the evidence compelling that it really is original soft tissue.  To rule out other explanations, he points to (1) the reaction of the tissue to antibodies, (2) the peptide sequence data, and (3) the discovery of intact histone proteins.Tennant’s blog entry says that Phil Manning coined the term “chemical ghosts,” but the phrase seems misleading.  They are not phantoms, but real original remains, including osteocytes with their delicate dendrites intact.  Tennant includes some electron micrographs of T. rex vessels infiltrated with iron, compared with tissues from a hadrosaur fossil and from a recently-dead ostrich.  Since they all show infiltration of iron, it’s iron to the rescue!  Soft tissue can be preserved for 70 million years!  (See 11/26/13 about Schweitzer’s hypothesis.)  Now, armed with a catch-all “explanation” for delicate remains, he can breathe a sigh of relief, and get excited again with his evolutionary scientism:For me, this is one of the greatest steps in recent palaeontology – no longer do we just have bones, but we have other soft tissues like feathers, skin, and internal structures, adding a whole new bio-chemical dimension to how we perceive fossils. Of course, this opens up a whole new wealth of knowledge to be uncovered about extinct animals, their physiologies, and their evolutionary roles.So why aren’t paleontologists all over the world rushing to uncover all this evidence they had not considered before?  He doesn’t say.  Nine years after Schweitzer’s first bombshell announcement (3/24/05, 1/30/11), maybe they still don’t like the sound of it.Other Dinosaur NewsSpeaking of T. rex, Europe got its version of a tyrannosaur, which National Geographic calls “Big Bruiser.”  A “pint-size” tyrannosaur was found in Alaska, Nature News reported.  Finally, in a bizarre mix of cosmology and paleontology, both Nature and New Scientist proposed a hypothesis that dark matter killed the dinosaurs.  The idea is that the solar system passes through the disk of the Milky Way periodically, where dark matter is expected to be more dense.  The extra matter might trigger barrages of comets.  This hypothesis was not treated with unmixed support:The arbitrary selection of craters and the fact that some estimates of their ages bear large error bars, adds to the uncertainty, says Adrian Melott, an astrophysicist at the University of Kansas in Lawrence. “Dissipative dark matter is a possible explanation, but it’s not clear that it’s explaining anything real,” he says.Despite its speculative basis, Randall says that the exercise is valuable. “This is trying to turn this somewhat crazy idea into science, by saying we will make predictions based on it,” she says. “We’re not saying we think it’s 100% going to be true.“Send in your crazy idea to Nature and make a prediction.  Who knows; maybe they will publish it.Well, you have just observed something about “the scientific community.”  They are willing to blast the world to hang on to their evolutionary notions.  They will ignore evidence that stares them in the face.  They don’t like the sound of anything that threatens their naturalistic religion with its obligatory moyboys.  They believe in ghosts and children’s fairy tales (whatever happened to uniformity of nature, if Goldilocks is their savior?).  They invent phrases that masquerade as explanations, that accomplish nothing more than hiding their biases.  Give them contradictory evidence, and they will laugh you out of the room.  When they can’t do that any longer, they will grasp at any straw and turn it into a pillar, then stand on it and proclaim how wonderful scientism is.This is known as “suppressing the truth in unrighteousness” (Romans 1:18). 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South Africa Expos in China focus on investment projects

first_img14 October 2014South Africa will promote its projects and export products for investment at the upcoming annual South African Expos in China, says the Department of Trade and Industry (dti).This comes as the two countries celebrate 16 years of diplomatic ties this year. “South Africa in China celebrations also coincide with South Africa’s celebration of 20 years of freedom and democracy. South Africa is therefore conducting a series of activities including cultural promotions, art shows, trade exhibitions and fairs, among others,’ said the department’s Rob Davies.The expos will take place from 20 to 31 October in Hong Kong, Shenzhen, Chengdu, Shanghai and Beijing.This year’s expos are under the theme: The Year of South Africa in China. A delegation of 51 South African companies will participate in the expos to ensure that trade and investment is increased between the two countries.South Africa is using the expos to focus on value-added products and investment projects.“South Africa’s major exports to China have traditionally been mining products, iron and steel, heavy chemicals and nonferrous metals exports in the region of $5-billion a year.“South African imports from China are dominated by clothing, machinery, televisions, communication equipment, furniture and footwear,’ said Davies.The two countries have entered into a Comprehensive Strategic Partnership aimed at strengthening political and economic relations, as well as to improve the current trade structure between the two.“The top 10 identified products and projects cut across different sectors of the economy, as outlined in the Industrial Policy Action Plan (IPAP). They provide considerable opportunities for South Africa to diversify its export base to China. “The South African Expos in China is a strategic project serving as a conduit to accelerate development and industrialisation,’ said Davies.The companies participating in the Expos are in the agro-processing, plastics, chemicals, aluminium, transport, and paper and pulp sectors, among others. Last year, 63 South African companies participated in the expos.Source: SAnews.govlast_img read more

Start 2017 on the Right Note with These Brand New Tracks

first_imgDiscover the latest music to hit our library and give your videos a fresh new sound for 2017.The start of any year is an opportunity to take on new creative endeavors and try out video projects that you may not normally consider. In other words, it’s about keeping things fresh. With that in mind, we’ve released a powerhouse of a playlist that features our latest exclusive royalty free tracks. That way, you can dive into your new 2017 projects with some bold new tunes.Hear 2017’s New Royalty Free MusicThe common thread binding our latest music picks together? These are powerful tracks that blend acoustic moods with contemporary electronic sounds. From slow building cues to bold, epic instrumentals, this is music that will make your audience take notice.While perfect for any video project, our latest picks are ideal for when you need to get right to the heart of your story in a short space of time. Great for ads or short promos that require viewers to quickly invest in what’s happening on screen.To get started, check out “Today Will Be Great” by Irish composer Emmett Cook. He has crafted an optimistic track that starts out with hopeful cello textures and then builds triumphantly. “Railroads” by Tonemassif is a high-energy dance track using futuristic synth textures to conjure up a sense of innovation.Now that you’ve scratched the surface of our latest releases, dive in and hear the rest. Remember, all of our music is royalty free and copyright clear. All you need to do is pick a license that suits your needs, and you’re ready to go. So get listening, get inspired, and give your 2017 projects a fresh new sound.last_img read more