US crash investigators most wanted list!

first_imgAviation safety doesn’t just happen. It’s hard-won, composed of lessons learned from accidents and incidents. Its’ the job of the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board, one of the smallest yet hardest-working organizations in Washington, D.C., to chronicle what goes wrong when an airplane crashes and issue recommendations to fix the problems.The Safety Board just issued its ‘Most Wanted’ list for 2016, improvements aimed at making almost all modes of transportation safer. As often happens, aviation concerns either led, or were near the top of, the list. At least five of the ten ‘Most Wanted’ improvements are related to commercial aviation. The NTSB wants U.S. regulators to:Require medical fitness for dutyNTSB says, “When safety-critical personnel, such as public vehicle operators (in many cases that means pilots) have untreated medical conditions that prevent them from doing their jobs effectively, people can be seriously injured or die.” The Safety board cites a case in which a FedEx Boeing 727 cargo jet flew into the ground while on approach to Tallahassee, Florida “because the pilot had a severe color vision deficiency which made it difficult for him to correctly identify the color of the airport’s PAPI lights that were warning him the flight was too low.” Three people were injured in the crash.NTSB recommends a comprehensive medical certification system for safety-critical transportation personnel that includes—among other things—a complete medical history taken at prescribed intervals that includes medications, conditions and treatments as well as physical exams; and an exam to identify personnel at high-risk for sleep disorders. End substance abuse in transportationThe Safety Board says, “Our new reality” is that drugs or alcohol can affect the ability to operate any vehicle, including aircraft. NTSB recently studied drug use among all fatally-injured pilots. What it found was sobering: “The prevalence of potentially impairing drugs increased from an average of 11 percent of fatally-injured accident pilots during the period from 1990-1997 to an average of 23 percent of accident pilots during the period 2008-2012…The most commonly found impairing substance was diphenhydramine, a sedating antihistamine found in over-the-counter medications.”As to what can be done, the Safety Board concedes, “Unfortunately, for most drugs, the relationship between the amount consumed and crash risk is not well understood. We need more and better data to better understand the scope of the problem and the effectiveness of countermeasures.” Expand the use of recorders to enhance transportation safetyStating flat-out that “no single tool has helped determine what went wrong [in an accident] more than recorders,” NTSB recommends the use of cockpit image recorders—not merely voice and flight data reorders. Noting that in a crash “data and/or voice recorders may have been present. But some questions could have been answered only through the data provided by an image recorder. Image recorders can help fill in the gaps.”This isn’t a new recommendation on the part of the Safety Board. Previous suggestions that video recorders be installed in the cockpits of airliners have been met with opposition among some pilots.Strengthen occupant protectionThe Safety Board says it’s investigated “many accidents where improved occupant protection systems…could have reduced injuries and saved lives.” The 2013 crash of an Asiana Boring 777 at San Francisco International illustrates the issue, where “a lack of restraint use led to some tragic consequences.” NTSB says, “While 99 percent of passengers survived…two of the three fatally injured passengers were ejected from the airplane because they were unrestrained.”The Safety Board is especially keen to see improvements in rules regulating child restraint. Ironically, “While we are required to secure our luggage and even small items such as snacks and beverages during takeoff and landing, the [U.S.] Federal Aviation Administration exempts the most vulnerable passengers—children underage two—allowing them to travel unrestrained, or on an adult’s lap.”The Safety Board wants to see increased use of existing restraint systems, systems that “preserve survivable space and ensure ease of evacuation.”Reduce fatigue-related accidentsFatigue can have terrible consequences. “Nearly 20 percent of the 182 major NTSB investigations [of accidents affecting all modes of transportation] completed between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2012 identified fatigue as a probable cause, contributing factor or finding.” One of the most glaring instances was the August 14, 2013 crash of a UPS A300 cargo aircraft at Birmingham, Alabama. Both the captain and first officer died.As to what can be done, the Safety Board says, “Over the past three decades a great deal of research has been done. But research only goes so far; we must implement what we have learned.”Lessons that were hard-won indeed.last_img read more

Major HIV prevention breakthrough

first_imgProfessor Salim Abdool Karim, director of Caprisa, at work in one of the centre’s laboratories. (Image: Caprisa) MEDIA CONTACTS • Salim Abdool Karim Director: Caprisa +27 31 260 4548 karims1@ukzn.ac.za • Quarraisha Abdool Karim Associate Scientific Director: Caprisa +27 31 260 4208 abdoolq2@ukzn.ac.za RELATED ARTICLES • HIV vaccine hope for Africans • SA first with HIV kidney transplant • Major HIV-testing drive for SA • Global grannies unite against Aids • SA makes strides in medical researchThe HIV/Aids prevention community is abuzz with excitement with the news that South African research has developed a vaginal gel – known as a microbicide – that can reduce sexually transmitted HIV infection by as much as 54%.A two-and-a-half-year study of 889 women by the Durban-based Centre for the Aids Programme of Research in South Africa (Caprisa) found that a vaginal gel containing the antiretroviral drug tenofovir was 39% effective in reducing a woman’s HIV risk when used for about three-quarters of sex acts. It was 54% effective when used more consistently, and also halved the incidence of genital herpes infections.Download the press release (PDF, 263 KB)“Tenofovir gel could fill an important HIV prevention gap by empowering women who are unable to successfully negotiate mutual faithfulness or condom use with their male partners,” said Quarraisha Abdool Karim, one of the lead investigators of the study and associate director of Caprisa.“This new technology has the potential to alter the course of the HIV epidemic, especially in Southern Africa where young women bear the brunt of this devastating disease.”More than half of new HIV infections in Africa occur in women and girls. The Caprisa study findings are likely to revive flagging morale among researchers disappointed by two decades of failed efforts to develop a female-controlled method of HIV prevention.“We are giving hope to women,” Michel Sidibé, executive director of UNAids, said in a statement. “For the first time we have seen results for a woman-initiated and controlled HIV prevention option.“If confirmed, a microbicide will be a powerful option for the prevention revolution and help us break the trajectory of the Aids epidemic.”Funded by the South African and US governments, the Caprisa trial involved 889 HIV-negative, sexually active South African women who were considered to be at high risk of HIV infection. Half of the women were given vaginal applicators containing a 1% concentration of tenofovir gel, while the other half were given a placebo gel. The women were asked to insert a dose of the gel 12 hours before sexual intercourse and a second dose within 12 hours after intercourse.Over the course of the year-long study, 98 women became HIV positive – 38 in the tenofovir gel group compared to 60 in the placebo gel group. On average, adherence to the gel was over 70%, but among women who used the tenofovir gel for more than 80% of sex acts the gel provided greater protection from HIV.“We believe that the most responsible plan of action now is to quickly and efficiently articulate the sequence of steps necessary for confirmation and follow-up of these results, while also aggressively planning for potential roll-out of a licensable product,” Mitchell Warren, executive director of the Aids Vaccine Advocacy Coalition, said in a statement.“As exciting as this result is – and as important as it is to follow it up without delay – the reality is that this product will not be available for widespread introduction tomorrow,” Mitchell said. “It is critical to manage expectations while maintaining urgency.”The research results were published online by Science magazine on Monday.Download the article (PDF, 1.6 MB)Source: Irin PlusNews and MediaClubSouthAfrica.com reporterlast_img read more

Alf Kumalo: South Africa loses a hero

first_img22 October 2012Less than a week before the passing of one of South Africa’s longest serving photojournalists, Alf Kumalo, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com spoke to his eldest daughter Sibusiso, and the curator of the photography museum he founded.Kumalo died at age 82 at the Charlotte Maxeke hospital in Johannesburg, on Sunday 21 October after struggling with prostate cancer. He enjoyed a long and eventful career spanning over six decades, eloquently capturing South Africa’s progression from apartheid state to a democracy.Sibusiso referred to her father as a people’s person who would always tell stories – generally funny ones – about his work.“I remember him telling me how he was not allowed to take pictures during the Soweto riots of the 1980s,” she recalled, “and he learned to balance the camera on his head so, using a self-timer, he could shoot without using his hands.”Sibusiso was born in 1969 but only lived with her father for nine years until 1978 when her parents divorced.She expressed her gratitude for the time the two of them spent healing old wounds. “I am glad to have had a relationship with him where we ironed out old issues before he was on his death bed.”Tributes pour inPresident Jacob Zuma said in a statement that South Africa had lost an outstanding individual.“He was a meticulous photographer and his work will live on forever as a monument to the people’s resilience and fortitude in the face of colonial oppression and apartheid,” Zuma said.In a tribute issued by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory on Monday morning, spokesperson Sello Hatang reflected on Kumalo’s career, which began in earnest in 1951 and mirrored the rise of Mandela’s own political career.“He was one of South Africa’s most eminent photographers and one who closely documented the life of Nelson Mandela both before and after his imprisonment,” Hatang said.“Bra Alf photographed many of the historic events in which Mandela played a key role, including the Treason and Rivonia trials.”From the time Mandela was sentenced in 1962 to five years in jail and then to life in 1964, he added, Kumalo continued to photograph the struggle against apartheid and, importantly, to visually record the life of Mandela’s family.Former ambassador to the UN Dumisani Kumalo, a cousin of the late photographer, told The Times newspaper that he had not been well for a while.“We lost a hero. We lost a great man and a brother and a pillar in our family,” said Kumalo.Six decades of photographyKumalo’s is credited with some of the country’s most captivating photography that captured numerous historic events from as early on as the 1950s.It was after he freelanced for Bantu World newspaper – which later became known as The World – and worked for Golden City Post that he began to rise to prominence, and especially during his tenure at Drum magazine in the 1960s.Kumalo entered and won his first photographic competition in 1963, and the announcement reached him while he was in London covering a Mohammad Ali fight.He had entered under his African names Mangaliso Dukuza, because he wanted the judging to be impartial and not influenced by his already-flourishing reputation.Other momentous events captured by Kumalo include the infamous student uprising of 1976, the release of Mandela from prison in 1990, negotiations at the Convention for a Democratic South Africa – often referred to in local media as the “Codesa talks” – and the former president’s inauguration as South Africa’s first black head of state in 1994.A solo exhibition of his life’s work took place at the 59th session of the UN General Assembly in September 2004.In the same year Kumalo received the Order of Ikhamanga in silver for his contribution to documentary photography and journalism in the country. The award is presented by the president in recognition of South Africans who have excelled in the fields of arts, culture, literature, music, journalism or sport.His work has appeared on international publications including Britain’s Observer, the New York Times and the New York Post and Ireland’s Sunday Independent. Passing on his skillsIn 2002 Kumalo opened the doors to a school of photography, which he operated from what used to be his house in Diepkloof, for the benefit of previously disadvantaged youngsters who aspire to follow in his footsteps. There is also a museum with his works on the premises, where Jabu Perreira works as a full-time curator.“Personally I think his portraits are the best,” he told our journalist. “The good thing about Alf’s work during the apartheid era is that his talent came from inside and his subjects felt relaxed with him behind the lens.”Because of a lack of funds, the school has not been able to enrol new students for several years. It was initially funded by a grant from Movimondo, an Italian NGO involved in the field of photography.“Bra Alf would be invited to events as a VIP, but he would end up taking photos and engaging with the masses instead,” said Perreira.Kumalo’s vision for the museum, which is currently being renovated, was to create an artistic space for people who are in the arts.“We want to host film screenings, exhibitions and seminars on photography to attract an audience to the museum,” said Perreira.First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast – December 11, 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest No major changes to the forecast this morning. The focal point for the moisture this weekend and next week seems to be a little farther east, but that still means we have 3 threats of moisture in a Friday to Tuesday period, and our totals look similar to our prior forecast. The map at right shows our thinking for 10 day combined moisture totals, at least how they look converted to liquid equivalent.We are dry today through Friday morning. Today will be rather cold again, but tomorrow not as cold as winds turn more to the south. On Friday clouds increase quickly. We likely see sprinkles develop Friday evening and then showers push farther north overnight Friday night though early Saturday afternoon. Rain totals will end up being from a few hundredths to .6″ with coverage at 60% of the state. We see nothing north of a line from Cleveland to Dayton.After a brief break in the action, another round of moisture is back for overnight Saturday night through Sunday midday. This time cold air is back in with the moisture, and we expect snow showers. Accumulations are likely, but should be minor at a coating to 12 with coverage at 80% of the state. We shut off the moisture later Sunday afternoon and stay dry through Monday afternoon.Later Monday night our third wave of moisture comes in with rain showers from I-70 south through the day Tuesday. Rains can be a bit impressive here with totals of .1″-.7″. Coverage will be nearly 90% of areas from I-70 south, but areas north of I-70 will stay dry. The entire region dries down to finish next week with a mix of clouds and sunshine Wednesday through Friday. Temps will be chilly to start that period, but will moderate toward next weekend.last_img read more

Sparkling Liverpool back in Champions League

first_imgView comments SEA Games: PH’s Alisson Perticheto tops ice skating short program WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding LATEST STORIES Philippines scores gold in lawn bowls men’s fours Read Next SEA Games in Calabarzon safe, secure – Solcom chief Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games PLAY LIST 00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:27Filipino athletes get grand send-off ahead of SEA Games00:50Trending Articles01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Liverpool’s Emre Can celebrates scoring his side’s first goal during the Champions League qualifying play-off second leg soccer match between Liverpool and Hoffenheim at Anfield stadium in Liverpool, England, Wednesday, Aug. 23, 2017. (AP Photo/Dave Thompson)LIVERPOOL, England—Juergen Klopp had just seen his Liverpool team slice open Hoffenheim to score a third goal in the opening 21 minutes when he turned to the celebrating Anfield crowd and roared: “That’s football!”Liverpool returned to the Champions League group stage in some style on Wednesday.ADVERTISEMENT UPLB exempted from SEA Games class suspension Emre Can scored goals either side of Salah’s tap-in as Liverpool surged 3-0 ahead. The third goal was masterful, with Mane breaking clear, cutting inside and backheeling the ball to Firmino, whose cross to the far post was tucked home on the volley by Can.“I think we’ve scored a few nice goals,” Klopp said of his nearly two years in charge, “but that was outstanding.”With his team now needing five goals to progress, Hoffenheim’s 30-year-old coach, Julian Nagelsmann, threw on an extra attacker in the 24th minute and Mark Uth had an immediate impact, drilling a low shot into the corner four minutes later.Neither defense covered itself in glory in the first half, and the goals kept coming after halftime. Jordan Henderson robbed Hoffenheim captain Kevin Vogt to run through on goal, before passing across for Firmino to slot into the bottom corner in the 63rd.“He was impossible to defend,” Klopp said of Firmino, his deep-lying striker.ADVERTISEMENT MOST READ LIST: Class, gov’t work suspensions during 30th SEA Games LOOK: Venues for 2019 SEA Games With the attacking trio of Roberto Firmino, Mo Salah and Sadio Mane combining brilliantly, Liverpool beat Hoffenheim 4-2 with a devastating attacking display to seal a return to Europe’s elite club competition after a two-year absence.The Reds advanced 6-3 on aggregate in the qualifying playoff and will be placed in the pot of third seeds in Thursday’s draw.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutout“The start of the game was like a thunderstorm,” Klopp said. “We were so dangerous, so clinical. We could have scored even more.”Hoffenheim is playing in European competition for the first time in its history this season and was swept away on another atmospheric night at Anfield. Sandro Wagner headed in a late goal for Hoffenheim.“We were running around like headless chickens,” Nagelsmann said of his team’s display in the first 30 minutes, “and they were scoring the kind of goals they always score in the Premier League.”“Sometimes,” he added, “you just have to admit your opponent is better.”Liverpool produced its exhilarating performance without star playmaker Philippe Coutinho, who remains unavailable — officially because he is both ill and injured — amid sustained interest from Barcelona.On this evidence, the Reds don’t need him, although their defensive frailties were exposed again, especially on the flank of left back Alberto Moreno.Liverpool joins Chelsea, Tottenham, Manchester City and Europa League winner Manchester United as part of a five-strong English representation in the group stage.Here’s a look at the other second legs in the playoffs: Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Catriona Gray spends Thanksgiving by preparing meals for people with illnesseslast_img read more

Avalanche Beat Sharks 4-3 to Even Series at Game Apiece (Vid)

first_imgSAN JOSE, Calif. — Trailing in the second period and in danger of going down 2-0 in the series, Colorado Avalanche coach Jared Bednar put his three top scorers back on a line together and got the results he sought.Gabriel Landeskog scored the first goal and Mikko Rantanen’s hustle helped create the tiebreaking tally from Tyson Barrie, sending the Avalanche to a 4-3 victory over the San Jose Sharks on Sunday that tied the second-round series at a game apiece.“In the first period, we didn’t get much going so maybe he wanted to switch a little bit and see if it brings a spark,” Rantanen said. “We got an early goal from Landy and there was no changing back.”Colorado Avalanche’s Nathan MacKinnon (29) shoots to score a goal against San Jose Sharks’ Erik Karlsson (65) in the third period of Game 2 of an NHL hockey second-round playoff series at the SAP Center in San Jose, Calif., on Sunday, April 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Josie Lepe)Landeskog, Rantanen and Nathan MacKinnon were reunited early in the second period and helped provide goals on the first and fourth shifts, turning the tide of the series in Colorado’s direction after a 5-2 loss in the opener.Former Shark Matt Nieto scored in the third period and MacKinnon added an empty-netter to give Colorado its third victory in its past 24 games in San Jose. Philipp Grubauer made 31 saves.“It’s big for our confidence,” said Barrie, who had a goal and two assists. “This is a tough building to win in. We haven’t had a whole lot of success here. We wanted to come in and at least get a split. We did that.”Game 3 is Tuesday night in Denver.Brent Burns scored twice and Evander Kane also scored for the Sharks, who had won four straight games. Martin Jones made 28 saves.The Avalanche turned the game around thanks to their top line that has been so dangerous all year. Landeskog got to the front the net to deflect a point shot from Barrie past Jones for the equalizer midway through the second.The ice was tilted Colorado’s way after that and the trio helped deliver again a couple of shifts later. Rantanen raced past Marc-Edouard Vlasic to negate an icing and create a scoring chance for Colorado. Jones made a good stop on Landeskog from in close but the puck went out to Barrie at the top of the faceoff circle and he beat Jones with a shot to the top corner to give Colorado a 2-1 lead.“I just tried to beat the D and run the puck down,” Rantanen said. “Landy gave me the 50-50 puck and they didn’t whistle it down so it was good for us.”The Sharks appeared to slow up on the play in anticipation of the icing call and that brief hesitation proved costly when the linesman didn’t blow the play dead.“Whether I thought it was doesn’t matter,” coach Peter DeBoer said. “The players did and they let up, they relaxed for a minute, it obviously wasn’t, so it’s I guess a lesson, and that is don’t assume anything is in the playoffs, play and make sure.”San Jose Sharks’ Marc-Edouard Vlasic (44) watches as Colorado Avalanche’s Gabriel Landeskog (92) scores goal against Sharks goaltender Martin Jones (31) in the second period of Game 2 of an NHL hockey second-round playoff series at the SAP Center in San Jose, Calif., on Sunday, April 28, 2019. (AP Photo/Josie Lepe)The Sharks had a chance to tie it early in the third but Grubauer robbed Logan Couture from the slot with a glove save.Shortly after, Nieto scored following a scramble in front of Jones after a turnover by Marcus Sorensen to make it 3-1 and give the Avalanche some breathing room.Burns scored with a wrister from the top circle to make it a one-goal game with 4:34 to play.But MacKinnon scored an empty-netter with 1:02 to play that made Burns’ power-play goal with 10.9 seconds left moot.The Sharks got off to a fast start as they looked to build on their 5-2 victory in the series opener. They looked like the quicker team early and appeared to have much more energy than they did Friday night when they were still recovering from a grueling seven-game series in the first round.That paid off midway through the first when Kane beat rookie Cale Makar to the rebound of Burns’ point shot and knocked it past Grubauer for his first goal since the playoff opener.The Sharks had plenty of more chances late in the period but were unable to get anything else past Grubauer, who made a brilliant glove save to rob Kevin Labanc in the final minute of the first.“We should’ve been up two or three after the first,” Couture said. “We had too many good looks not to score a second one and give ourselves a bigger lead, and then they found their game in the second.”NOTES: MacKinnon and Rantanen extended their point streaks to six games, the first time an Avalanche player has done that in the postseason since Peter Forsberg had a seven-gamer in 2004. … F Micheal Haley returned to the Sharks lineup after missing the past five games with a lower-body injury. Dylan Gambrell was scratched. … San Jose captain Joe Pavelski (concussion) and F Joonas Donskoi (undisclosed) remain sidelined.By: Josh Dubow, AP Sports WriterTweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

SpaceXs 1st traveller is moonstruck Japanese fashion tycoon

first_imgTOKYO – The Japanese billionaire who Tesla chief Elon Musk says plans to blast off on the first-ever private commercial space trip aboard the SpaceX Big Falcon Rocket often makes headlines in Japan. The SpaceX mission, set for takeoff in 2023, is just the latest exploit in tycoon Yusaku Maezawa’s colorful and ambitious career:___FASHION BRANDMaezawa, 42, is the chief executive of Start Today Co., which he founded in 1998 as a CD sales business when he was still in his 20s. The company pioneered e-commerce in Japan and now runs the popular fashion mall Zozotown, selling various, relatively affordable clothing brands. Annual sales totalled more than 98 billion yen ($890 million) in the fiscal year that ended in March.___THE MONEYForbes magazine estimates Maezawa’s wealth at $2.9 billion. In a nation where billionaires are relatively rare, he gets attention for his celebrity friends and for zipping around in a private jet and fleet of sports cars. Such flamboyance is uncommon in a country where even very rich men often keep a low profile.___MUSICAL BEGINNINGSMaezawa’s trademark defiant but disarming style may be rooted in his start as a musician, playing drums in indie rock bands. The punk band he was in, called Switch Style, signed with a major Japanese record label. He opted out of attending prestigious Waseda University in Tokyo to pursue music and then started his own business selling imported CDs. The name of his company was inspired by the title of an album by the American punk band Gorilla Biscuits.___ART COLLECTIONMaezawa has invested lavishly in art, collecting works by Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, among others, and in designer-brand furniture from abroad. He paid $110.5 million for Basquiat’s 1982 painting of a graffiti-like black and blue rendition of a human skull, a record price for an American artist, at a Sotheby’s auction last year. “When I saw this painting, I was struck with so much excitement and gratitude for my love of art,” Maezawa said at the time. He had set the previous auction record for a Basquiat, in 2016, when he paid $57.3 million.___PERSONAL LIFEMaezawa recently has been dating Japanese actress Ayame Goriki. He previously had a widely publicized relationship with model and actress Saeko, the ex-wife of major league baseball player Yu Darvish. In a recent tweet, when someone asked whether he was going to get married soon, Maezawa replied, “No.”___THE SUITMaezawa has recently shown off a wearable technology called the Zozosuit, the centerpiece of his Zozo fashion brand. Customers first order a black, body-hugging outfit covered with white dots. They then take a smartphone photo wearing the outfit which is used to do a full body scan, determining shapes and sizes with a special app. Choices are still limited to basic pants and shirts for now, but that could change.___SPACE TRIPMaezawa says the planned trip to space is a way “to inspire the dreamer in all of us.” He plans to take six or eight artists, architects and designers with him. He hasn’t said who they might be or how much he is paying for the trip. The idea is for those creative minds to see the moon up close and planet Earth from afar. Maezawa says he has often wondered what Basquiat might have drawn if he had travelled into space. “I choose to go to the moon, with artists,” Maezawa tweeted both in Japanese and English.___Follow Yuri Kageyama on Twitter at https://twitter.com/yurikageyamaHer work can be found at https://www.apnews.com/search/yuri%20kageyamalast_img read more

Shell Canada to release exploratory permits off BC coast

first_img“Releasing these exploration permits can help protect spectacular and environmentally rich areas off Canada’s West Coast where we have no plans to explore for oil and gas,” said Shell Canada President and Country Chair, Michael Crothers. “We saw an opportunity to support marine protection as part of our ongoing efforts to find pragmatic ways to contribute to conservation in Canada while maintaining our robust global exploration portfolio.”The company said that drilling activities it completed in the two basins before the 1972 moratorium had resulted in many oil and gas shows, indicating the potential for hydrocarbon resources in both basins.Given the ongoing moratorium, Shell said that it plans to formally release the permits and work with the federal government on potential investments to support marine conservation efforts in consultation with Indigenous Peoples and environmental groups.The company also announced that it will seek advice from the Nature Conservancy of Canada to determine how releasing these permits might achieve the most effective conservation outcomes.“Effective protection of our coasts, oceans and wildlife requires strong partnerships and collaborative efforts on all sides,” said Fisheries, Oceans and Canadian Coast Guard Minister Jonathan Wilkinson. “Our government is pleased to be working with First Nations partners, the Government of British Columbia and Shell to ensure the Scott Islands remain a thriving hub of biodiversity and marine life for generations to come.” CALGARY, A.B. – Shell Canada announced today that it will be voluntarily releasing 50,000 square kilometres of exploratory permits off the B.C. coast in order to support marine conservation efforts.The acreage covers an area more than one and a half times the size of Vancouver Island and is located in three separate locations in the Queen Charlotte and Tofino basins.Shell’s permit area, which has been under a Federal moratorium since 1972, overlaps with about one-third of the newly-designated Scott Islands National Wildlife Area off the northern tip of Vancouver Island.last_img read more

Stomach issues signal future mental problems

first_imgChildren who face adversities – such as parental separation – are more likely to suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms which may lead to mental health issues in later life, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Development and Psychopathology, found that gastrointestinal symptoms in children may have an impact on the brain and behaviour as they grow to maturity. “One common reason children show up at doctors’ offices is intestinal complaints,” said Nim Tottenham, a professor at Columbia University in the US. “Our findings indicate that gastrointestinal symptoms in young children could be a red flag to primary care physicians for future emotional health problems,” said Tottenham. Scientists have long noted the strong connection between the gut and brain. Previous research has demonstrated that a history of trauma or abuse has been reported in up to half of adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), at a prevalence twice that of patients without IBS. “The role of trauma in increasing vulnerability to both gastrointestinal and mental health symptoms is well established in adults but rarely studied in childhood,” said Bridget Callaghan, a post-doctoral research fellow at Columbia. Animal studies have demonstrated that adversity-induced changes in the gut microbiome influence neurological development, but no human studies have done so. “Our study is among the first to link disruption of a child’s gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity with brain activity in regions associated with emotional health.” The researchers focused on development in children who experienced extreme psychosocial deprivation due to institutional care before international adoption. Separation of a child from a parent is known to be a powerful predictor of mental health issues in humans. That experience, when modelled in rodents, induces fear and anxiety, hinders neurodevelopment and alters microbial communities across the lifespan. The researchers drew upon data from 115 children adopted from orphanages or foster care on or before approximately they were two years old, and from 229 children raised by a biological caregiver. The children with past caregiving disruptions showed higher levels of symptoms that included stomach aches, constipation, vomiting and nausea. From that sample of adoptees, the researchers then selected eight participants, ages seven to 13, from the adversity exposed group and another eight who’d been in the group raised by their biological parents. The children with a history of early caregiving disruptions had distinctly different gut microbiomes from those raised with biological caregivers from birth. Brain scans of all the children also showed that brain activity patterns were correlated with certain bacteria. “It is too early to say anything conclusive, but our study indicates that adversity-associated changes in the gut microbiome are related to brain function, including differences in the regions of the brain associated with emotional processing,” said Tottenham.last_img read more

Pleasant morning in Delhi 34 degrees likely

first_imgNew Delhi: It was a bright and cool morning in the national capital on Tuesday with the minimum temperature recorded two notches below the season’s average at 16.2 degrees Celsius. The maximum temperature was expected to hover around 34 degrees Celsius. “The sky will remain clear throughout the day,” an Indian Meteorological Department official said. At 8.30 a.m. the humidity was recorded at 65 per cent. On Monday, the maximum temperature was recorded at 33.7 degrees Celsius, while the minimum was recorded a notch below the season’s average at 17.6 degrees Celsius, both season’s average.last_img read more