AAC Football’s Official Twitter Account Trolled Penn State

first_imgAmerican Athletic Conference twitter page trolls Penn State.American TweetPenn State made some news yesterday when it was revealed that the team literally buried the game tape of its 27-10 season-opening loss to Temple with a shovel. In the embarrassing defeat, the Nittany Lions surrendered 10 sacks. While Penn State was ready to let that game go, the American Athletic Conference, of which Temple is a member, wants to relish the memory of it . That’s why the AAC’s official football Twitter account dropped a solid troll job on Penn State this morning. Penn State may have buried the game tape, but you can watch all 10 @Temple_FB sacks from Sat on our YouTube page https://t.co/xkp5lidkzS— American Football (@American_FB) September 9, 2015That’s tremendous. This was Temple’s first win over PSU in over 70 years, and they set a conference sack record in the process. The AAC doesn’t have many opportunities to brag about its football accomplishments, so it is understandably proud of the Owls’ performance.last_img read more

Lamark Media Partners With AfterSchool AllStars To Support 3rd Annual Celebrity Poker

first_imgLamark Media, an innovative full-service digital marketing agency, partnered with After-School All-Stars as a premier sponsor and strategic partner for the 3rd Annual All-In for All-Stars private charity poker tournament.The tournament was held on January 22, 2017, from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Nobu Miami Beach, Florida.The charity event benefitted the local South Florida students enrolled in After School All-Stars (ASAS), Arnold Schwarzenegger’s foundation for at-risk youth that provides comprehensive after-school programs that keep children safe and help them succeed in school and life.Hosted by Wayne Boich, Mark Groussman and Sean Posner, and featuring celebrity comedian Tom Arnold, the event featured top prizes from HUBLOT. The tournament took place in a private space at Chef Nobu Matsuhisa’s Nobu Miami, 4525 Collins Ave., Miami Beach. Sushi and Japanese-Peruvian fare were served with hand-crafted cocktails in a pre-tournament reception. A premium open bar and hand-rolled cigars were available throughout, along with fine wine and liquor tastings. Premier Sponsors of the event included Nobu Miami, Hublot, Crystal Cruises, Hard Rock Hotels, Inspirato, Lamark Media, Miami Marlins, Miami Heat, Fox Sports Florida, Rose Magazine, XM Cigar Co., Chivas, Haute Living, Louis XIII, and Estrella Damm. Numerous athletes and celebrities were in attendance to support the cause and participated in the live auction, all in efforts to create awareness for the After-School All-Stars charity.“We are honored to sponsor this event and will continue to support this great organization as a strategic partner to increase awareness for an amazing cause. As a new father myself, I am even more aware of the importance and value in providing children with the tools that they need to achieve success throughout all stages of life.” – Bryan Shetsky, Founder and CEO of Lamark MediaASAS South Florida’s VP of External Affairs Natalia Sol thanks Lamark Media for their participation in the 2017 tournament.“We are tremendously grateful to the many incredible partners that supported this important fundraising effort to ensure that critical programs for our community’s most at-risk students can be provided every day from 3-6pm. Working with Lamark Media enables us to amplify our message and engage our greater community in this important work.” – Natalia Sol, Vice President of External Affairs of the South Florida chapter of After-School All-Stars.NFL Conference Championship games were broadcasted on large screen televisions during the tournament and silent auction, keeping the sports theme throughout, while philanthropists, celebrities, athletes and other supporters enjoyed a day of celebration and fundraising at Nobu on Miami Beach.Since its inception, the All-In for All-Stars event has raised over $1 million towards the charity fulfilling their mission to help middle school youth through the nation’s largest school-based, comprehensive after-school program.last_img read more

Commentary Cleveland Browns need to pick a QB and stick with him

Cleveland Browns quarterback Brian Hoyer (6) is run down by Buffalo Bills linebacker Kiko Alonso as he scrambles toward the sideline during first-quarter action at FirstEnergy Stadium in Cleveland Oct. 3.Credit: Courtesy of MCTIn 1996 the Cleveland Browns were forcefully relocated to Baltimore and renamed the Ravens by owner Art Modell, also known as Cleveland’s most hated man, save for, perhaps, LeBron James.In 1999 the NFL held true to its promise of bringing football back to Cleveland and the Browns returned as an expansion team.Since then, the Ravens have gone on to win two Super Bowls while the Browns have managed a whopping one playoff appearance, of which the team lost in the first round.During the time since that 1999 season the Ravens have fielded 13 starting quarterbacks. While still high, that number pales in comparison to Cleveland’s 19 signal callers in said period.Over that time, only one quarterback has started all 16 games in a single season for Cleveland: Tim Couch during the 2001 campaign. That year also marked one of only three times the Browns finished a year 7-9 or better. The other two times you ask? In 2002, when Couch started 14 games and 2007, when Derek Anderson started 15. Anderson got the nod halfway through the season opener.The biggest difference between the old Browns (Baltimore) and the new Browns (Cleveland) is stability at the quarterback position. The Ravens have had a quarterback start all 16 games seven times since 1999, including five straight seasons out of their current quarterback, Joe Flacco.It is time for the Browns to commit, and that can’t happen if they hire a new coach and draft a new “quarterback of the future” every few years.Cleveland has three options at the position right now. It can ride it out with 29-year-old second-year quarterback Brandon Weeden, who has shown flashes but may be too far away from stardom considering his old-age. The Browns could wait out the rest of the season with Weeden, then fully commit to the currently injured but promising Brian Hoyer.Or they could draft a quarterback in 2014.Some might argue they could pick up a free agent like Matt Flynn, but a player who has failed to capitalize on the QB situations in Seattle and Oakland has to have some issues. Keeping Weeden, waiting for Hoyer or signing Flynn are the only viable options in Cleveland, and they must pick one right away in order to have any chance at stability.For me, the best choice is Hoyer. Weeden has talent, but he has a knack for playing game to game, there is no consistency so far, plus he is nearly 30. Hoyer is two years younger and spent three seasons learning under Tom Brady with the New England Patriots. While he has made a grand total of two starts in his Cleveland career, Hoyer won both of them and provided hope for a fan base that has been searching for a spark for nearly two decades.In past seasons I might choose the “draft a new guy” option, but I do not see anyone in the upcoming draft that I would commit to from day one, and that is what Cleveland has to do.No more quarterback battles in training camp. No more drafting of a Couch or a Brady Quinn, no more gambles on a too-old rookie like Weeden. It’s time for Cleveland to pick a player, give him the job and stick with him through thick and thin.Without stability the Browns will continue to be one of the laughing-stocks of the NFL, and the blame can only be placed on themselves. read more

Urban Meyers comfort level improving along with offensive line pass defense needs

Ohio State football coach Urban Meyer made his weekly appearance on the Big Ten teleconference Tuesday afternoon and discussed the improved play of the offensive line, the emergence of sophomore running back Ezekiel Elliott and his comfort level with the team thus far.The Buckeyes are 3-1 on the season following a 50-28 victory over the Cincinnati Bearcats Saturday night.        Meyer said after Saturday’s win over Cincinnati his offensive line has “crossed the barrier” and added he believes the offense has developed depth and more of an identity. He named redshirt-junior Chase Farris as someone who has improved and is earning playing time on the offensive line.        He said that with the return of senior tight end Jeff Heuerman from injury to go along with the improved line play that the Buckeyes have more of an offensive identity now.        Meyer said he believes the performance of Elliott is a product of better offensive line play.        Meyer said the running back position as a unit is the hardest working group on the team. He gave credit to running backs coach Stan Drayton and said Elliott is among the top two or three hardest workers on the team.        He said after evaluating the pass defense, he doesn’t think there is a lack of talent, rather a lack of execution. He said young corners in the secondary simply need to play better, singling out redshirt-freshmen Gareon Conley and Eli Apple as players who need to improve.        Meyer said his comfort level with his team is night and day from where it was week one against Navy.        He said the biggest challenge for the Buckeyes going into Saturday’s game against Maryland will be slowing down the Terrapin offensive skill players. Meyer added that Maryland quarterback C.J. Brown will greatly test OSU as he is the leading passer and rusher for Maryland.The Buckeyes are scheduled to take on the Maryland Terrapins on Saturday at noon at Byrd Stadium in College Park, Md. read more

Nordic telco TeliaSonera is combining its two Lith

first_imgNordic telco TeliaSonera is combining its two Lithuanian services, fixed-line operator Teo and mobile player Omnitel, in a single company that TeliaSonera says will strengthen its core business in the Nordic and Baltic markets.Teo will acquire Omnitel for €220 million on a cash and debt-free basis, with the united company expected to generate annual synergies of around €10 million when the deal is completed.Based on Omnitel’s full-year 2014 results, the purchase price corresponds to an EV/EBITDA multiple of 7.8x or approximately 5.7x taking the estimated synergies into consideration. A fairness opinion has been delivered by KPMG to the Board of Directors of Teo in connection with the transaction, according to TeliaSonera.Teo will use external financing for the acquisition and TeliaSonera’s ownership in Teo will remain at 88.15% following the transaction. The acquisition is expected to be completed by first quarter of 2016.“Consumers no longer make a distinction between fixed and mobile services and the demand for converged offerings are steadily increasing. The combination of Teo and Omnitel will create a leading, fully converged telecom operator and strengthen the market position through clear synergies and enhanced customer proposition,” said Robert Andersson, chair of the board of Teo.Separately, Teo this week added sports, news, fashion, interior design and entertainment service Delfi TV to its Interneto.tv OTT offering.Teo said it would also add a further four music and movie channels for kids from mid-October.Teo is also introducing catch-up TV for the past three days from 25 channels on the service, as well as 16 radiostations. Teo Smart TV customers will be able to use Interneto.tv free until the end of this year, after which they will be charged €4.90 a month for the service.“Delfi TV has become a video content broadcaster just as important as other Lithuanian TV stations. However, we are entering the professional TV market with new technologies, multi-platform solutions, which will allow viewers to watch sports broadcasts, quality shows and reportages at the time and place convenient for them via many devices,” said Vytautas Benokraitis, director of Delfi Media Group.last_img read more

Jumia Celebrating its Anniversary with Massive Discounts on its Products

first_imgPaul Tesar, Head of Growth Jumia Uganda (L) and Ron Kawamara, Jumia Uganda CEO (R) pose for a group photo with their partners from Liberty Insurance (2nd right) and Transtel (2nd left) at the launch of their anniversary celebration at Hotel Africana on Tuesday 18th, June 2019. Advertisement Jumia Uganda to today at a press brief held at the Hotel Africana announced it was giving its customers up to 77% discounts as they celebrate their anniversary.The offer will start effective June 24th till July 14th with the discounts applicable on all products — in commemoration of its anniversary to mark major milestones achieved over the period of its operations in Uganda.It is with no doubt that the e-Commerce firm has made great strides in Uganda’s e-Commerce scene since their launch in 2014. – Advertisement – “Since launching in Uganda, we have revolutionized the economy through a sustainable impact on commerce in the country. We have added e-Commerce as an alternative source of service provision through the platform. But even as we celebrate these milestones, we continue to be innovative in finding more ways to solve problems faced by our vendors and customers,” Ron Kawamara, Jumia Uganda CEO said during the press conference.Ron Kawamara, Jumia Uganda CEO addressing the press during the launch of their anniversary celebration at Hotel Africana on Tuesday 18th, June 2019.Commenting on the celebration of this anniversary, Head of Growth Jumia Uganda, Mr. Paul Tesar, commended how Ugandans are increasingly embracing e-Commerce and online shopping.On Jumia, it has seen a growth from an average of 100 orders a day, to a thousand and collectively has over 2,000 active merchants in the country — including over 100 local partners that Jumia has helped develop.Paul noted that top among reason why their customers shop with them is assortment. As seen from the presentation he presented, price followed, then, convenience and trust.Paul Tesar, Head of Growth Jumia Uganda addressing the press during the launch of their anniversary celebration at Hotel Africana on Tuesday 18th, June 2019.Jumia has collaborated with its partners including; Transtel, Reddington, Liberty Insurance, Samsung, Nokia, BlueFlame and Skyworth as their celebrate their forthcoming anniversary.These partners will be headlining the anniversary sale, offering the very best prices on services and a wide assortment of products.During the celebrations, customers will have their products delivered within a period of 24 hours only for those around Kampala.Jumia also has a partnership with Liberty Insurance. Thus customers can choose an insurance option for theft and damage of the products while shopping and pay UGX5,000. Note that the insurance fee depends on the product as well as the value of the product but doesn’t go beyond 2% of the product.For instance if a customer bought a product below UGX200,000 they pay UGX5,000 for insurance. If they bought a product between UGX200,000 to UGX400,000, they pay UGX10,000 for insurance.last_img read more

The 10 FastestGrowing New or Redesigned Apps in 2018

first_img July 18, 2018 Image credit: Mixmike | Getty Images The era of ‘Angry Birds’ is over. Add to Queue The 10 Fastest-Growing New or Redesigned Apps in 2018 Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Apps 3 min read Editorial Interncenter_img Enroll Now for $5 Madison Semarjian Forget the useless, though wildly popular and entertaining, apps that previously filled up our smartphones or computers. People now want apps with function and purpose.Here are the fastest-growing new or recently redesigned apps of 2018, according to business app platform Zapier, which compiled the data using its platform.1. DiscordNostalgic for the days you stayed up late playing The Sims and messaging with your friends? Discord is a voice and text chat app that connects more than 14 million daily players in the gaming community through video and audio.2. Things 3If you need help organizing your busy schedule but don’t have a personal assistant, check out Things 3. This award-winning personal task manager app can help you get things done and achieve your goals in an organized manner.3. LeadpagesNot your typical email marketing service, Leadpages helps you create customized landing pages, webinars and ads to generate leads. It focuses on growing your email list, then links to a third-party site, such as MailChimp, to send your campaigns to those that signed up.4. KlayivoKlayivo pulls in data from your ecommerce platform, point-of-sale software or other marketing tools and helps you create highly targeted and super-relevant email, Facebook and Instagram marketing. You can set up automated trigger emails for when customers sign up, abandon shopping carts and check out.5. SquareSquare handles all of your company’s digital finances. With four different platforms (Payments, Point of Sale, Payroll and Capital), Square helps you track all of your money on your smart device. Compatible with both Apple and Android, you can make customer transactions, pay employees and fund your company.6. SalesflareIf you feel like you waste too much time updating your CRM, Salesflare is for you. A CRM that basically fills out itself, Salesflare inputs data for you so you can focus on making sales. It reminds you what follow-ups are the most important and who talked to what customer, so your team can efficiently work together to increase profit.7. CodaIf you want to build your own website instead of relying on Squarespace or Weebly, Coda lets you hand-code with a little help. It edits your text to make sure your coding is in tip-top shape.8. LandbotLandbot creates a Chatbot for you within minutes that lives in your website and enhances your customer’s experiences.  9. ClickUpClickUp’s easy-to-use product management software keeps your team productive, efficient and headache-free. It lets you integrate with more than 1,000 other services, such as Slack and Zapier, to keep everything your company needs in one convenient place.10. GhostA modern-publishing toolbox, Ghost helps you create and manage an online blog or publication. It edits, manages content, schedules, builds proper SEO and more, all through its simple platform. Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. –shares Next Article Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brandlast_img read more

The Impossible Burger Is Coming to Burger King

first_img White Castle was just the start: Impossible Foods is now partnering with Burger King, launching the Impossible Whopper for a test starting today at 59 Burger King outlets in St. Louis, Missouri. It’s an entirely different burger to the sliders served at White Castle, and that means there’s more Impossible Burger non-meat involved.It’s equal parts silly April Fools’ teaser and actual product launch at the U.S.’s second-largest burger chain. For now, the company is staying quiet on whether there’ll be a nationwide roll-out. The Whopper launch comes after another regional debut: a Philly Cheesesteak that’s currently exclusive to, well, Philadelphia of course.If it’s been a while since you’ve had a Whopper, or you’ve been vegetarian for a while, the Impossible Whopper includes a flame-grilled, (improved) plant-based burger patty, with lettuce, tomato, pickle and onion toppings. Oh, and don’t forget the mayo and ketchup. This story originally appeared on Engadget Add to Queue For now, the company is staying quiet on whether there’ll be a nationwide roll-out. Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Image credit: Impossible Foods via engadget Fast Food Mat Smith 1 min read –shares The Impossible Burger Is Coming to Burger King April 1, 2019 Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. Next Article Register Now »last_img read more

Podcast Cannabis Investing Tips for NonMillionaires

first_imgPodcast Get 1 Year of Green Entrepreneur for $19.99 Image credit: Codie Sanchez Podcast: Cannabis Investing Tips for Non-Millionaires 15+ min read Jonathan Small Next Article Add to Queue May 23, 2019center_img Cannabis stocks are all the rage. IPOs valued at billions of dollars are popping up on Wall Street and the Canadian Stock Exchange, and private equity funds are investing multiple millions in cannabis companies.If you’re watching all this from the sidelines, wondering if you’re missing out on a golden opportunity but not sure what to do about it, you’re not alone. Many potential investors believe they don’t have the cash to get in the game, and in some instances they’re correct. Due to regulations, many funds are not even permitted to accept investments for less than $200,000.On this week’s Green Entrepreneur podcast, we talk to Codie Sanchez, a partner at Cresco Capital Partners, about how to invest in cannabis companies even if you don’t have a lot of cash. This is a full transcript of our interview. Related: Why Former NBA Star Al Harrington is Betting On CannabisYou started your career with lots of spreadsheets and more traditional investing, and have now transitioned to the cannabis industry and business. I’m curious to know why you made that change.I think there might be some parallels to a lot of people’s story in this space in that once you figure out investing, and particularly if you’re trained to do it, once you figure out how to find dislocations in markets – something where everything just doesn’t fit together perfectly so that people smarter than you and who have more money than you do can take advantage of it – when you see those dislocations, you learn to jump on them quickly. In investing we call this arbitrage. That’s when something typically costs less than it should or costs more, and you can take advantage of those things happening.So I saw that happening in this space. I’m certainly no genius or clairvoyant in it; it really just came down to the math and looking at math in this space as an investor and saying there’s a real, tangible generation of wealth creation event happening here.But I have to say that probably math would not have been enough if I was going to call my mom and tell her I was going to go into the cannabis game. [laughs] It was a little bit deeper than that.I started off my career, even before I was traditionally investing at firms like Goldman or State Street or Vanguard or doing some of the venture stuff, I was actually an investigative journalist. I don’t know if we talked about this before, but I worked at the U.S.-Mexico border. We were writing stories about human trafficking and drug smuggling.Wow, that’s intense. What part of the border?The part that you would probably know is right across the border is a place called Juárez, [across] from El Paso, Texas.Yes, it’s notorious.Exactly. They call it Ciudad de la Muerte, the city of death. It’s a pretty tough place to be young and female. Thy have hundreds and hundreds a year of murdered women there for some reason.But what that taught me, besides to be relatively jaded, is that as an investigative journalist you really don’t take anything at face value. You have to question everything, find the root of why things happened, and then dig deeper. You really can’t let stigma get in the way, or people’s assumptions; otherwise you’ll never write a good story.This tendency taught me to do this deep diving, and that’s when I got to the math, and also a little bit of the heartstrings. I think anybody in this space has a story – and I know you’ve shared some of yours too – about the impact that it’s had. I dug into that a little bit in particular with veterans, which we can talk about later. We fund an initiative called Texans for Veterans, which is trying to give veterans in Texas access to research and medicinal marijuana.How many times in your lifetime do you get a chance to be a part of a generational wealth creation event where there’s massive dislocation so little guys can play too, because the big guys aren’t all allowed to with their legal background, and then in tandem you get to make a huge impact – I think in multiple areas, but certainly with mental health and veterans, which I’m very aligned with since my partner is one.Your partner is a veteran?Yeah. My significant other. He’s active duty military right now, in the Navy.Has cannabis made an impact in his life?No, they’re very, very highly regulated. He does some particular things for the military in which that’s not allowed. Actually, for the military overall, if you use cannabis, you can lose your VA benefits, be fired. There are huge repercussions. But what he and I both have done is be a part of this nonprofit that essentially is trying to push for access for veterans.He’s the first one to say, “Gosh, if I could use it, I absolutely would,” for the chronic inflammation that you get from being deployed so many times, and certainly from – everybody comes back with some type of hyperawareness and certainly that stress that comes from being in a warzone.And you’ve seen firsthand that cannabis has helped veterans with those symptoms you’re talking about?Oh, absolutely. There’s one gentleman whose name is Keith who’s a bronze medal winner. He served in three different branches of the military, lifelong veteran. He was actually here in D.C. when the Pentagon was hit and was one of the first responders because he was a trained nurse. He’ll very publicly say – so I can say his name – that without cannabis, he doesn’t know if he’d still be around because of the opioid cocktails that they were giving him. He just wasn’t reacting well to them. He had a lot of anger and anger issues.Now with cannabis, he has a lovely family and wife and a cute dog. I think, while that is not quantifiable because there’s not enough research on it, there is certainly a lot of qualitative human interaction that you can see that it makes a differenceI know there’s no such thing as easy money, but I think people who are not necessarily directly involved in the industry, whether they’re touching the plant or not touching the plant, might have some interest in investing, at least, in the industry. That is what you do. Your clients are generally big spenders, right? To get into your fund – tell me a little bit about the fund that you work with.It’s called Cresco Capital Partners, and it’s a private equity or growth equity fund in the cannabis space. What’s interesting is due to the regulations around a lot of how these funds are structured, they actually mandate that you have higher minimums, typically because you’re only allowed so many investors in the fund and they have to be accredited. So even if I wanted to allow everybody in at $5 or $10, it’s very hard to do that at this stage.Now, that changes, and as you get more funding you can create a more complex fund business. But at this stage, this is our second fund, which is $55 million. The first one was around $25 million. We have co-investments, so we’re probably right around somewhere like $100 million in assets. The minimum is $200k, so that does make it difficult for everybody who wants to invest. It’s still one of the lowest in the space. I’ve tried to keep it lower. It’s an administrative nightmare to do so.Image credit: Codie SanchezBut I think the whole point of this industry is democratizing access, right? I think that’s what we’re going to talk about today – how to do that, whether it’s investing with somebody like us, or ramping up to invest with somebody like us, or doing it on your own. We can talk about all of the above and how I started investing in cannabis.Let’s talk first of all a little bit about what you do with the money that people invest with you. Who has Cresco invested in and some of the companies that are under your purview?This is where I get excited. There’s nothing more fun than giving the lifeblood, which is capital, to really incredible organizations. In this industry in particular, it all moves so fast, you get to see what that money does that you give these companies quickly and all the people you’re able to serve one way or the other.We’ve invested in a lot of interesting companies. We’ve had about seven exits thus far, which means companies that have been sold or gone public or done some sort of merger. We invested in some names probably people know, like Acreage, one of the biggest companies out there, who’s had a little bit of news.They recently merged or were acquired by Canopy Growth.Yeah, for a tiny amount, $3.5 billion. We’ll see. It’s the right to buy them, so it’s pending that legalization happens – but you covered that well.Then we invested in GTI, which other people probably know. We invest in a company called Ebbu that was bought by Canopy Growth for just shy of $500 million. We invested in another company called Form Factory, which was also sold. That one’s interesting. It’s kind of a co-packing business and a branding company. And then we have lots of up-and-coming companies in the portfolio, like Prohibited, which is a big media company. You guys have done stuff with them. I think that company is fascinating because they’re doing brands too and leveraging this medium platform to maybe figure out who will be the future brands of cannabis. And then we invest in another company called Sublime. Great product.I love their music.Oh, the music? [laughs] Well, these guys are not of the ’90s. They were probably born around that time period. But they do these little things called Dosies, which are micro-dose, almost. They look like Tic-Tacs. They’re manufactured by the same manufacturer of Tic-Tac to do the candy coating that they do. So they taste like orange Tic-Tacs, and they’re great for sleep. My grandmother has a problem with her hip and she can’t sleep, so she uses Dosies now. I got turned onto it. One of my partners, who’s another woman and a mom, said after you have kids you really never sleep again, and these helped her. So I thought it might work for my grandma, too.You oversee a $100 million dollar fund. I’m sure you get pitches all day long. What are some of the main things that you look for in a company? I’ll tell you one thing, my inbox never gets to zero, that’s for sure. We’ve screened over 1,800 companies and hundreds a year, and what we look for is twofold. One, we’re not seed stage, meaning we don’t invest on the early side of the business like a tech company might when there is no revenue yet or no product. We invest in the growth equity space. Typically we’re looking at companies that are already generating anywhere from $1-$20 million in revenue. We need them to be revving a lot in order for us to invest.We definitely are interested in companies that first and foremost – which I think any good investor will tell you –you’re really betting on the team. The idea is important, but as any entrepreneur knows, there are going to be pivots, there’s going to be heartbreak, there’s going to be backstabbing. It’s like Lifetime TV if you want to go run a company. You have to pick people that are resilient to do it. So we do a ton of time on due diligence on the teams. I was just talking to a big MSO today, actually, and one of the sales points for them –That’s a multi-state operator, for those taking notes at home. Good one. The thing that sold me was they are a multi-state operator and their COO is one of the smartest operators I’ve ever seen. That’s always a good trick if you’re looking to invest: figure out, can they actually operate? Because cannabis is not a simplistic business. It’s highly complex. You want to make sure you have somebody that can handle it. Let’s get to the million dollar question, which is: I don’t have a million dollars, but I want to be a player in this business, or at least I want to invest in this business. Where do I start? What do I do? If I know that a lot of the really successful funds such as yours have a pretty high bar of entry, unless I have $200,000 – which I don’t. I think the goal here is to do just that, to get your seat at the deal-making table and to get you deals and access into the space that really outstrips your network. The secret is, I really believe wealth is made on the private side. If you look at anybody who has accumulated wealth – not just rich, but real wealth – it’s because they’ve done investing either on real estate or in their own company on the private side. That’s just the “why” of this even mattering.Explain that a little bit to me. On the private side, meaning they’re not public companies that they invest in? It’s very hard to make generational wealth or real wealth by investing in public stock markets. You can see that very quickly. Say you put all the faces from the Forbes 100 list, billionaires out there, on one page. What you would notice if you went through all their bios is not a single one of them made their money from smartly investing in public stocks.The brilliant Warren Buffett, Carl Icahn, they only move when they have three things. The first one is an unfair advantage. For instance, Carl is an activist  . He can go bother the founders of the company until they make changes to the actual company and make him money. So you need an unfair advantage in some way.Your unfair advantage, Jon, might be that you have really incredible deal flow because all these entrepreneurs want to pitch you all the time. So you might be able to see trends and know people and be a connector because of all this deal flow that you see.So one is your unfair advantage. That’s what you need. The second thing that you need is intimate knowledge. Not insider knowledge. You can’t have anything illegal. But you need intimate knowledge of the industry, the company, whatever you’re investing in. You really can’t get that with public stocks because otherwise it would be insider information. So intimate knowledge meaning you have some access to their financials, or just that you know an industry intimately?I believe access to their financials or access to the actual founders or access to their actual distributors. Something beyond what the news and Jim Cramer could scream at you on CNBC. So you need that.Then the third thing that you need is the ability to affect the outcome. That’s how we invest on the private side because by giving them capital, we can talk to them about how they’re going to exit, who’s going to buy them, if we could help them structure the exit on the backend, all of that.Those three things are really key to massively investing. But we’re talking at a super high level. We’re not all going to have that on Day 1, but you should always have that in the back of your mind. It’s why I’m really worried about anybody who’s a price speculator.What does that mean?Price speculator basically means – everybody knows about the cryptocurrency crisis. The housing crisis really was no different, and there was also the internet bubble, and then if we go way back there was tulip mania, which was where people were paying hundreds of dollars for a tulip bulb. Nuts.It’s all the same thing, though. It’s all called price speculation, which basically means people invest in something just because they think the next guy is going to buy at a higher price and they’ll be able to sell after he gets in. But they don’t believe that there’s real value in what they’re investing in. They’re price speculating that the price is going to go up no matter what.We’ve got to be careful about that. There’s a little bit of that in cannabis, so on the public side I’m really cautious about investing. We talk about price a lot. Warren Buffett talks about that too.It seems really out of whack right now on the public side, the valuations of the companies. Yeah, I think so. I think you’re nailing it. I don’t have a crystal ball. If I did, we’d be on my yacht while we’re recording this podcast. But what I think is important to think about on the public side, or any time valuations or the price of stocks is concerned, is it might be really exciting the numbers that they’re at, and they might do all the things they need to do in order to grow into that price, but I’m always looking at the downside.Does it make sense for the top 10 cannabis stocks to be worth 4x more than the top 10 biotech, tobacco, pharma, or healthcare stocks, from a price-to-sales perspective (which just means the price that they’re worth versus how much they actually sell)? I would say I don’t know. It’s a growth industry; it could be, but probably not. The key to investing there is always buy low, sell high, and train your brain on that, to focus on price first before excitement.You gave us the three attributes or the three keys to think about and ways to position yourself. You had also mentioned you need to make relationships, you need to network outside of your network. How do you recommend doing that?Codie: I think there are a couple different ways. One, if you want to invest, in my opinion, or if you want to do anything – say you want to play baseball. The first thing that you should probably go do is watch a baseball game. Then you should probably go try to play a baseball game amongst you and your friends. Then you should probably try to figure out who are the reporters that cover baseball. Then you should probably try to go to three or four conferences of people who are talking about baseball or selling baseball gear or something related to baseball.It’s not dissimilar to investing. You go where the game is played. In cannabis, in my opinion, that would be places like ArcView, which is kind of like AngelList, if you know what that is. AngelList is where you can go and invest in lots of different startups, but at very low dollar amounts. ArcView is similar but for cannabis, and they also have conferences. So I think you go to a couple ArcView conferences, you join that.They should be, in my opinion, getting smart. They’ve got to listen to all the podcasts on Green Entrepreneur, and then go over to CannaInsider podcast, and then go and look at some of the investor intelligence reports like Cohen. Don’t spend a lifetime; do this in a weekend. You can binge-listen to a couple podcasts, binge-read all the investor intelligence on MJBiz or Green Entrepreneur or Cohen.Then you start reaching out. Then you try to go to an ArcView event. Schedule one. Then you email all the speakers at the ArcView event. Give yourself a timeline. You have 30 days to get smart on it.What’s crazy is, after you do those three things – listen to a ton of podcasts, read as much as you can about the industry, and then get hooked up to an industry group and go to one of their conferences – you are smarter than 90% of the population on cannabis.What’s the conversation you have with these people that you connect with through ArcView or these different platforms that you have recommended? Is that the moment when you present yourself, about who you are and what you have to offer?I think you have to first have a belief that I’ve found to be true across every industry I’ve been in, which is that if you go where the game is played because you want to be in the game somehow, you will have opportunities presented to you that you never otherwise would.That’s my promise to you. If you do these three things and you go to where the game is played with a curious and open mind and dig in, you’re going to have stuff come up that you didn’t exactly realize how the opportunity was presented to you, and you wouldn’t have picked it exactly this way, but it’s even better than you thought.If you have that belief, then when you go, I think there are two things that are super important. One is curiosity. We’re all egoists, right? I like to have my ego stroked. I’m sure you do [laughs] Never. But the truth is, if somebody comes up to me and says, “Codie, I’ve been reading your stuff, listening to your podcast here, I saw you speak here, and I’m really curious as to what you meant here” or “I’m really curious, what do you think about this?” or “how would you enter this space?” or “why did you do this particular move?” – those small, tailored questions to somebody’s ego, showing that you’re truly curious, not faking it – that goes really far. If you do that to five or ten people, the likelihood is you have two to three to four who want to engage with you. So that’s where I’d start. Curiosity.But then I think the second thing you’ve got to do if you actually want to get in – I just interviewed an analyst today, actually, for our firm. The way he came to me was similar to this. Reached out, said he had listened to a few things. But he did something different that I loved, which was “I’ve been doing research and analysis on the space. I’m in grad school right now and did some models on vertically integrated companies” — which are companies like Acreage, let’s say.So he said, “I did some research on these guys. Would that be useful to you?” I was like, “Huh, that’s interesting. Yeah, sure, I’ll take a look.” I looked at it. The models were actually really good, so I followed up with him. Right now I’m looking at the lab testing space, for example. Every time somebody wants to sell you cannabis, they’ve got to go make sure that they take it to a third-party lab to see if it has any sort of pesticides in it or if it actually is THC at the level that they say it is. I’m interested in that space. So I said, “Why don’t you try to apply your thought process to this lab space?” He did it, did a great job, and I’ll probably offer him a job.So that second key is not what they can do for you, but what you can do for them. If you provide value to people who are in positions of power, that is so rare – so rare – that they are going to want you in their circle.Right. There’s an example of somebody who might not have had $200,000 to invest in the fund, but had an expertise that you appreciated and needed.Absolutely. And if you’re an employee in a fund, you get an allowance where you can invest much less, so you don’t have to put in $200k if you actually work at one of these funds. Even if you’re in admin.What are some common mistakes that you see people making?First is be careful with public stocks. If you’re going to do it, be fine losing the money and be prepared for a lot of volatility. I say that because there are also some great public stocks, so I’m not saying you shouldn’t do it; just be cautious.The second thing I see people do that makes me nervous is they just go and invest in one company right off the bat. Everybody’s raising for cannabis something or other these days. Even if it’s just the $1,000 that you have to invest, it’s really risky to throw that out there. It’s called angel investing, but it’s risky to do that with the first couple companies you’ve seen especially.So I think the biggest thing you’ve got to get used to if you want to be an investor is saying “no” upfront. You’re like the hot girl at the bar. “No, no, no, no.” You want to go on a lot of first dates, but you don’t want to get married to somebody – you don’t want to give them your money – until you’ve gotten a feel for this weird industry and how to do some investments. Don’t make your first investment when it’s been given to you.And Lord, I made some bad investments when I first started, so don’t feel bad if you did. But I think they say that the best way to make a million dollars in angel investing is to start with three, which is the same for vineyards too.So diversify. Do a fund.Yeah, do a fund. ArcView is the only one that I know of in the cannabis space. I don’t want it to feel like I’m doing a commercial for them. But you can go to these angel investing groups. The goal that I had when I first started investing was to invest alongside somebody that’s smarter than I amHow do you do that? Well, you can go to something like ArcView and listen to all of the companies pitch. It’s like YCombinator, which is famous in tech circles as being an incubator. Go to ArcView, listen to everybody pitch, and then see and ask them what other investors are investing in their company besides you. Then you very easily reach out to those people and say, “Hey, I’m Codie and I’m looking to invest in XYZ Cannabis Company too. Do you have a minute to talk so I can understand why you’re investing?”Once you are in the investing circle, it’s much easier to get doors open for you. So invest alongside people that are smarter than you. You can do that by starting at something like ArcView, or I think you can do that in a fund structure.Or you can do that by following some of the big names in this space, like what is Steve DeAngelo investing in? He probably has interesting insight, being in this industry for a long time. What is Jonathan investing in? He’s seen a lot of different cannabis companies. So look for those influencers and then see if you can get a little piece of the pie and put in a small amount of what you can.Should we apply the same sort of criteria that you apply when you’re looking at companies? You said that you say “no” a lot. What are some red flags that you would say “no” to? What would you see in a company that you would be like, “no”? Or what should I see in a company where I might have second thoughts? I think when you’re an early angel investor, you should never invest in a company that doesn’t have revenue. There’s too much deal flow, especially in cannabis, there’s too many companies to invest in somebody that has never made a dollar. So I would not do that. Look for companies that at least have a couple hundred thousand dollars to a million plus in revenue.What you’ll be amazed by is they’ll take your money – you might not have much, let’s say, but if you can provide some other type of value, some sweat equity – these startups are usually strapped for cash and for help. So you can probably even leverage your sweat equity a little bit there. But I would start with don’t invest if they’re pre-revenue. I think that’s way too much risk upfront.Then I would say also, be really careful about investing in friends who are not absolute rock stars who have already done this before. Maybe they had already run an alcohol distribution company, so now they’re going to go into cannabis distribution. That makes a lot of sense. But otherwise, be careful about funding friends early on, before you really know how to analyze if they’re capable or not. That’s where a lot of people lose money.You said that you want to make sure that you like the team and are impressed by the team that is running a company. Will you have that kind of access as somebody who’s new to the game? It’s not like you can call up every CEO. You’ll have access because of who you are and your status in the industry, but how does one – should you just do your own research online? How do you find out more about who these people are?One way you can get access is through special purpose vehicles. What a lot of people do when they don’t want to invest or don’t have a ton to invest is they might pool their assets. It’s pretty inexpensive. You create an LLC, which basically costs nothing online these days, and that LLC allows you – say you have $10,000 that you could invest, and a couple other people have $10,000 that they could invest, and you pool it together and now you have $100,000.You can make yourself sound very fancy. “I am in charge of Cannabis, Inc., which is an LLC of investors in the cannabis space. We’re analyzing companies.” So with very little work and with very little money, you can actually get a seat at the table and say “We have $100,000. We’re looking to deploy it, and maybe it’s with your company.” Then you can get better access, certainly.Or you can join into somebody else’s syndicate or join angels groups. There’s CannaAngels – almost every city has a cannabis angel network, and if you join one of them and you pool all your resources together – but you don’t have to do the actual work – then you can get real access.How quickly will you see an ROI?Well, in cannabis it’s been faster than it typically is. Most venture capital or private equity funds are 5-year funds, so your money’s locked up for 5 years with a 2-year extension, meaning they can extend that 5 years by 2 years if they want to. That’s typically because it takes that long for a company to have a liquidity event, which means when they sell or you get your money back in some way.So the typical thought is 5 to 7 years, which I know to all of us who use Uber Eats and expect our food to get delivered in 7 minutes, seems like an eternity. [laughs] But that’s standard. If you’re going to do this, it has to be long money, and in my opinion, you have to want to learn and make money.Our first fund, we returned the capital in 3 years because cannabis is moving so fast. But that is what draws people to public stocks, I think, a lot. It’s short-term, there’s an ability to make money, and it’s a lot more rewarding to that endorphin-heavy brain of ours that wants immediate feedback loops. If you’re seeing it too quickly, there might be something going on here that’s not right?In my opinion, yeah. I don’t like price speculation, which I think is entirely what crypto is about. I think blockchain is different, but yeah. You always worry if you’re at an airport somewhere and the shoeshine guy is giving you stock tips about cannabis companies or about cryptocurrency companies.The stock market is really there to help investors beat inflation over the long term. You earn your 10% per year, which helps you beat inflation, and compounding investing over time leads to you making enough money to retire, theoretically. So I’m always nervous if the stock market is looked at as an immediate cash cow. That’s probably not sustainable.As far as the type of cannabis companies to invest in. Tell me the top 3 that you should be looking at and top 3 that maybe you should pass on?I got offered a really interesting deal in Colombia, actually, by descendants of Pablo Escobar to grow cannabis in Colombia [laughs] I passed on that one. But in all seriousness, cultivation is something that I worry about as the price of flower or the actual cannabis smokeable plant goes down. That’s just natural. It is a plant and it is agriculture, so that’s going to happen as the markets get more efficient. So I’m not running to give money to people who are purely doing grows. I would stay away from that. I don’t think I’m the only one doing that.I would stay away from brands that are not amazingly executed and with the ability, proven and actual, to scale. There’s a lot of little micro-brands around, and I think many of those will die a death of a thousand papercuts with California regulations and others. So be careful about that space.I also think I would be careful about any sort of tech that mimics something that’s done by a company outside of the cannabis space. People say to me, “I’m going to be the oracle of cannabis,” and my response is, “Oracle will be the oracle of cannabis.”I wouldn’t do that because eventually this game will change and those companies – perhaps they get bought, and there are some instances where that could be the case. But I’m hesitant of that space. So those would be the three I would stay away from.And the three that seem to have a lot of opportunity?Up until now — and I think it’s still the case — multi-state operators have done incredibly well. They’re out there doing a land grab, trying to grab as many different dispensaries and the grows associated with the licenses in each state for them.So these are cannabis brands that operate in many different states because they have, like you said, dispensaries and grows in a bunch of different states? Exactly. It’s not dissimilar to a company that distributes, like Whole Foods for instance, across multiple state lines and grows all their own produce and has a ton of white label brands and everything, like you see in Whole Foods. Not dissimilar entirely for these multi-state operators. Those I think are going to continue to have a lot of value, if done really well and if they scale. I think the small one-off operations I wouldn’t be as interested in.The second space that we’re really focused on is everything to do with biotech in this space and the ability for cannabis to be used for medicinal purposes, whether that’s biosynthesis or being able to actually create cannabis in a lab through things like yeast or algae. It’s way above my paygrade from a science understanding perspective, but we have somebody on the team that that’s their specialty, so they dive into those companies. So I think anything in biotech and that sector could be really interesting if you get the real plays. Then the third area is really well-executed brands who are able to scale nationally and hopefully globally. We’ve made a few of those bets in the brand space, but gosh, we have to see a lot.Explain to our audience exactly what you mean by brands in this context.That basically means who’s going to be the Coca-Cola, Pepsi, Frito-Lay, Blue Moon of cannabis. These are cannabis brands that will become household names, hopefully. We don’t really have any of those right now. I don’t really think you could argue that there is a nationally recognized cannabis brands I can’t tell you the amount of times I get pitched, individual small CBD brands or THC brands, and they might have really nice packaging or make you feel good – I mean, a lot of times it’s the same product. We’re all dealing with the same brands, so why is this one product going to break out as opposed to the other hundred that I get pitched? It’s very hard as an investor to know. Is it the people attached to it? It’s the difference between RC Cola and Coke. How do you know which is the one that’s going to stand outSometimes it’s very hard to tell whether it’s all hype or if there’s something real there. What would be your way to dig a little deeper?First, I would want to see real revenue. If we’re dealing with a company like Sublime, for instance, we’re talking about double-digit millions in revenue, so then you know that there’s something there. They’re able to operate, people are buying these companies.Then the second thing — I have two good friends that run a company called Windy Hill Brands, and they sold an alcohol company that I’m blanking on, but it was something Moonshine, to the guys who created Deep Eddy Vodka. They’re just brand geniuses. So one of the things is having people in your corner who understand this space.The most important part there is also their ability to distribute. I’ve made mistakes before in investing in brands – not at Cresco, but when I was investing at different venture funds. There was a brand that I loved and I wanted this product to exist in the world, but I realized that the management team didn’t have the distribution chops. So they weren’t able to get it on the shelves of Whole Foods, for instance, or CVS or whatever the case may be – and they didn’t have that crazy sales drive to do it.What you really need in the brand space is it’s all about your distribution, and can you actually get your product in the hands of the distributors, or can you get your product, through ecommerce, sold online in a big way? A lot of founders are pretty lazy about getting their sales out in that way, and they want to do some of the fun stuff. Nobody likes cold calling.Say you have no money to invest in cannabis. Not a dollar. I’ve totally been there; my dad didn’t get to go to college, so I remember having nothing to invest and worried about my debit card not going through.The one thing that you can do is look for sweat equity into these companies. That is basically where you start doing all the stuff we talked about – meeting people, reading about it, reaching out to them via email – and then you say, “I’m Codie,” for instance, and say I’m a graphic designer. “I could do some graphic design work for you. You don’t have to pay me. I’ll just do it for you, but how about I work for some percent ownership in the company, and you pay that to me over this time period?”Or you could say, “I, Jonathan, am really good at copywriting because I’m a journalist. Why don’t I help you write some of your copy for your website or to your clients, and in exchange for that you give me some equity?” So there are certainly ways to use your skillset as your capital. I would think about that. If you google “sweat equity,” you’ll get a million different ways to do it.That’s great advice. Is it helpful to make a list of what you have to offer? Like, are you a graphic designer, are you a good publicist? What are a lot of these companies looking for?I think everything. Totally all of them are looking for help from a marketing – the two things that almost every company needs immediately is sales, so they need somebody to go out and bring them more revenue, and they need help with marketing. They need, just like you said, people to pitch publishers, people to write copy. Social media somewhat, because social media is tricky in this space. But yeah, somebody who’s good with social media in a way that won’t get them banned from Instagram. Exactly. And you can always say, “What are things that you need to have done that are terrible, that you don’t want to do? I’ll do that.” You can also offer it more broadly if you don’t have a direct solution.I would say what they don’t need is like “I’m really good at strategy. Let me give you strategy.” Nope, we’re executing. We don’t have time for third-party strategy. So that’s probably not as useful. But introductions to capital, sales, marketing, graphic design, anything like that is really valuable to a startup. Would you recommend having a formal agreement with a company? What I would be concerned about is that – most people are good people, but there’s going to be some bad apples, and they’re going to take advantage of you and then sell and not give you anything. Should you have some sort of contract with them?Yeah. We all watched the Facebook story, right? How I’ve done it in the past, before I was a bigger investor, was I would have a little something drafted up. Again, you can find this online, like a sweat equity contract.But essentially I would have a little contract that basically says “Codie is going to provide the following services. For these services, she is going to be given X percent of equity,” for them to fill in – and it’ll be vested, which means I actually own it – “over a 6, 12, or 18 month period,” whatever period you choose.But what I would say upfront is, “Hey, why don’t I do this for you, work for you for the next 30 days for $free.99? Free, totally. I’ll do this work for you for 30 days. I believe in what you’re doing. This is the contract that I’d like to sign at the end of 30 days for me to keep helping you like this. Does that sound good?” Typically they’ll be good on that front. You might get burned once, but you’re going to learn a ton, and then you’ll learn who not to trust next time.I think in tandem with that, then you can actually start adding some cash components of it. Once they see your work and how useful you are, if you crush it for them, people don’t want that to stop. Entrepreneurs aren’t stupid. So if you’re doing good work and you had your little equity thing drawn up, you can ask for cash as well so you’re not slaving away for free for 5 years.  –shares Entrepreneur Staff Want to invest in the cannabis industry but barely have enough to buy your own weed? Cody Sanchez of Cresco Capital Partners has suggestions. Subscribe Now Editor in Chief of Green Entrepreneur Green Entrepreneur provides how-to guides, ideas and expert insights for entrepreneurs looking to start and grow a cannabis business.last_img read more

Marianne Williamson May Seem a Little Bananas but Shes Right to Focus

first_img Marianne Williamson Food 68shares Guest Writer Add to Queue 6 min read Cofounder and President of the Reducetarian Foundation Image credit: Bloomberg | Getty Images Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Brian Katemancenter_img Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. Next Article Marianne Williamson May Seem a Little Bananas, but She’s Right to Focus on Food Issues Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Williams’s contribution on the debate stage was small, but important. Fixing our broken healthcare system won’t be easy for politicians or entrepreneurs — but it would save millions of lives. July 15, 2019 Last month’s Democratic debate touched on a lot of important subjects. But not enough time was given to one of the most urgent problems in the U.S. today: our diets are killing us.Around 45 percent of deaths from heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes in 2012 could be because of a poor diet. About three-fourths of the population has a diet low in vegetables and fruit, while most are eating too much salt, saturated fat and sugar. Research has found that even small amounts of processed meats can increase the risk of death, from cancer and particularly heart disease.This public health disaster is really costing us. Rising rates of chronic disease accounted for an estimated $211 billion of the $314 billion increase in healthcare spending in the U.S. between 1987 and 2000. More recent research has found that one in five deaths between 1990 and 2017 were associated with poor diet.During the debate, presidential candidate Marianne Williamson mentioned the importance of going deeper than “superficial fixes.” “[W]e don’t have a health care system in the United States, we have a sickness care system in the United States,” she said. “We just wait until somebody gets sick and then we talk about who is going pay for the treatment and how they’re going to be treated.”She said we need to talk about why so many Americans have unnecessary chronic illnesses compared to other countries, and the influence government has on our diets, and subsequently, our health and wellbeing.“It gets back into not just Big Pharma, not just health insurance companies, but it has to do with chemical policies, it has to do with environmental policies, it has to do with food, it has to do with drug policies, and it has to do with environment policies,” Williamson said.Many voters think she doesn’t stand a chance of becoming president, but in this instance Williamson has stood out among her competitors because many policymakers don’t want to talk about this broader issue. It’s easy for them to think this battle is far longer than their time in office will be, that it’s too anti-business. But this wasn’t an off-the-cuff crusade for Williamson. On her website, she argues that:”Until America comes to terms with how much we have acquiesced to the many unhealthy practices that should be considered unlawful — but which are currently allowed in order to increase corporate profits — we will continue to have a less-than-meaningful discussion of how as a society we provide health care.”People aren’t eating poor diets by choice; the country’s food system is designed this way. Processed food and fast food (notorious for meat-sweet items) are often cheaper and more accessible, and many trade lobbyists are pushing onto the population the very foods we need to stop eating. Improving attitudes around diet and health and longevity is welcome, but we also need to recognize the huge role policymakers play in this, and hold them accountable. For example, Williamson said we should end agricultural subsidies for unhealthy foods, including high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) and hydrogenated fats, and incentivize and subsidize those in industry and business making healthy food more available and affordable. Research has found that the rate of Type 2 diabetes is 20 percent higher in countries with higher availability of HFCS compared to countries that have less access to it.More and more scientists and entrepreneurs are acknowledging that we need to focus more on prevention and less on treatment, that it’s already too late when people seek help from their doctor to manage their weight. One hope is that AI and other futuristic technologies will be able to spot early markers of disease and help people prevent its onset through diet, exercise and lifestyle.Science and technology are also advancing the availability and quality of plant-based alternatives, which can play a role in helping people cut back on their meat intake. For example, in Beyond Meat’s R&D lab, an e-tongue “tastes” the Beyond Burger burgers for likeness to meat, and helps perfect the burger’s chewiness, and an e-nose isolates more than 1,000 animal and plant matter molecules. Whole plant-based foods would obviously be a healthier option, but meeting people where they are (like at the drive-thru at Carl’s Jr.) is arguably an important and realistic start.There are many complex and intertwining factors contributing to the soaring number of Americans with preventable diseases, and a wealth of legislation that could help: from education to food regulation, advertising standards to agriculture, what children are served in school, how scientists are funded and incentivized, the food patients are served in hospitals and the food deserts (and food swamps) preventing or disincentivizing populations from accessing fruit and vegetables.One major regulatory issue at the moment is labeling. States across the country are banning plant-based foods from using words such as “sausage” and “burger” to describe their products. Most recently, a ban in Mississippi prevents vegetarian and vegan foods from using such words. Many hope that legislators can push back on this, as there is no evidence for the main claim that such labeling confuses consumers, which courts have repeatedly affirmed.Michelle Obama’s efforts to tackle obesity and improve nutrition for children during her time as First Lady were commendable, despite criticisms for partnering with food giants. But now, we need much bolder policy change. Williams’s contribution on the debate stage was small, but important. Fixing our broken healthcare system won’t be easy for politicians or entrepreneurs — but it would save millions of lives. Given all that is at stake, let’s hope other candidates take a cue from Williams and raise food issues in the second Democratic debate. Enroll Now for $5last_img read more

Samsung to Cap Note 7 Battery Charge Via Software Update

first_img Samsung to Cap Note 7 Battery Charge Via Software Update Register Now » –shares Image credit: Reuters | Kim Hong-Ji Next Article This story originally appeared on Reuters Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Add to Queue 2 min read September 14, 2016 Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd., which has urged users of its Galaxy Note 7 smartphone to turn them in due to fire-prone batteries, said it will perform a software update in South Korea that limits the devices’ charge to 60 percent.The move comes as Samsung, the world’s biggest smartphone maker, also ran local advertisements apologizing for a recall that is unprecedented for a company that prides itself on its manufacturing prowess.It has not decided whether to implement similar software upgrades limiting battery charging in markets other than South Korea, a company spokeswoman said.The software update, which will be automatic, will begin at 2 a.m. local time on Sept. 20, Samsung said in a statement.The firm has sold 2.5 million Note 7 phones in 10 markets including South Korea and the United States that are subject to the recall.Samsung plans to begin offering replacement phones with safe batteries on Sept. 19 in South Korea.A series of warnings from regulators and airlines around the world has raised fears for the future of the flagship device, pushing Samsung shares lower.South Korea’s markets were closed on Wednesday for a public holiday.($1 = 1,124.7700 won)(Reporting by Tony Munroe and Se Young Lee; Editing by Edwina Gibbs) Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. The firm has sold 2.5 million Note 7 phones in 10 markets including South Korea and the United States that are subject to the recall. Reuters Samsunglast_img read more

Uber Hopes to Fly Around Commuters in 10 Years

first_img Image credit: Reuters | Uber/Handout 2019 Entrepreneur 360 List 50shares Uber Hopes to Fly Around Commuters in 10 Years Uber Next Article This story originally appeared on Reuters A vertical takeoff and landing aircraft (VTOL) leaves a heliport in an artist’s rendition released by ride-sharing company Uber in San Francisco, California, U.S. October 27 2016. It sounds like the opening sequence to’ The Jetsons,’ but Uber sees flying rides as feasible and eventually affordable.center_img Flying commuters like George Jetson could be whizzing to work through the sky less than 10 years from now, according to ride-services provider Uber, which believes the future of transportation is literally looking up.Uber Technologies Inc. released a white paper on Thursday envisioning a future in which commuters hop onto a small aircraft, take off vertically and within minutes arrive at their destinations. The flyers would eventually be unmanned, according to the company.It sounds like the opening sequence to The Jetsons, the 1962 U.S. cartoon about a future filled with moving sidewalks, robot housekeepers and spaceflight, but Uber sees flying rides as feasible and eventually affordable.Uber already offers helicopter rides to commuters in Brazil. The company plans to convene a global summit early next year to explore on-demand aviation, in which small electric aircraft could take off and land vertically to reduce congestion and save time for long-distance commuters, and eventually city dwellers.Others have also envisioned such aircraft, akin to a helicopter but without the noise and emissions. Vertical take off and landing aircraft have been studied and developed for decades, including by aircraft makers, the military, NASA and the Federal Aviation Administration.Uber is already exploring self-driving technology, hoping to slash costs by eliminating the need for drivers in its core business of on-demand rides. On-demand air transport marks a new frontier, set squarely in the future.Uber’s vision, detailed in a 97-page document, argues that on-demand aviation will be affordable and achievable in the next decade assuming effective collaboration between regulators, communities and manufacturers.Ultimately, using VTOLs for transport could be less expensive than owning a car, Uber predicted.Such on-demand VTOL aircraft would be “optionally piloted,” Uber said, where autonomous technology takes over the main workload and the pilot is relied on for situational awareness. Eventually, the aircraft will likely be fully automated, Uber said.Hurdles include battery technology. Batteries must come down in cost and charge faster, become more powerful and have longer lifecycles.Regulatory hurdles must also be solved such as certification by aviation regulators as well as infrastructure needs, such as more takeoff and landing cites.Uber plans to reach out to stakeholders within the next six months to explore the implications of urban air transport and share ideas before hosting a summit in early 2017 to explore the issues and solutions and help accelerate urban air transportation.(Reporting By Alexandria Sage; Editing by David Gregorio) 3 min read Add to Queue Reuters The only list that measures privately-held company performance across multiple dimensions—not just revenue. October 28, 2016 Apply Now »last_img read more

The First Emerging Tech Connector In Vietnam – YellowBlocks – Announces 100

first_img ARBigDatablockchaincloudElite1010NewsVRYellowBlocks Previous ArticleAd Fraud Hits Digital Agencies and the Courts: Major Brands Pull Nine-Figure Ad Spend While Litigation, Refunds and Chargebacks Give Ad Market a Black EyeNext ArticleNimble Now Selling Its Simple CRM for Office 365 Globally Through Microsoft’s New Commercial Marketplace The First Emerging Tech Connector In Vietnam – YellowBlocks – Announces 100 Global Partners In The Unprecedented Tech Cruise PRNewswire6 days agoJuly 17, 2019 YellowBlocks was founded in 2018 as the first emerging tech ecosystem connector for Vietnam. As the platform for collaboration for AI/ML, Blockchain, Cloud, BigData, IoT, AR/VR.., YellowBlocks is hosting an unprecedented event in Vietnam, The #Elite1010 Emerging Tech Cruise, with key stakeholders in the ecosystem. The event is taking place on July 19th, 2019 on the luxurious Saigon Sensation Cruise at the heart of Saigon.Marketing Technology News: VaaS and USB are Helping to Drive Growth in the Video Conferencing & Collaboration MarketFor the last five years, Techboom has put Vietnam on the watch list of global firms. The tech ecosystem is breathing change and innovation, a new chapter for Vietnam begins. In addition to being a tech-outsourcing destination, Vietnam is hungry and ready for R&D, technology innovation, and advanced product development.During the exclusive networking night, YellowBlocks will announce the list of 100 global partners featuring public sector, private sector, academic groups and tech startup community including global and local top names such as European Blockchain Hub, Startup Vietnam Foundation, SGInnovate, Viettel, Microsoft, Advantage Austria, Nhipcaudautu (The Business Review), Forbes, VnExpress, Topica, RMIT University, CIO Academy Asia, Saigon Innovation Hub, Schoolab.Marketing Technology News: DTiQ Launches Enhanced Video Analytics CapabilitiesDavid Lang – Key Advisor for YellowBlocks – shared, “After 40 years in the US and the last 12+ years of advising Fortune 100 companies on digital transformation, I come back to Vietnam at this golden time with a deep passion to elevate Vietnam to the world stage. If we can create a trusted-platform to connect all the players in the emerging technologies ecosystem, we can unleash the power of Vietnam. As the pioneer connector in Vietnam, YellowBlocks surely has caught my attention because of their global vision and local insights from Day 1.”Doan Kieu My (Kimiko), Founder of YellowBlocks, shared, “Our mission is to Connect the Connectors. Our vision is to become the gateway to Vietnam and the world for emerging tech ecosystem. This flagship event marks our commitment to bring our partners and advisors closer in the unprecedented format.”Marketing Technology News: Speedcast and In Aria! Networks Join Forces with Telespazio on Large-Scale, High-Capacity Video Serviceslast_img read more

Researchers crossreference historical divergence of Aedes aegypti populations

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 1 2018The BioScience Talks podcast features discussions of topical issues related to the biological sciences.Mosquito-borne diseases have plagued humanity for centuries, and a prolific offender has been Aedes aegypti, commonly known as the “yellow fever mosquito.” Despite the yellow-fever moniker, it is also a potent carrier of dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. Writing in BioScience, Dr. Jeffrey Powell and his colleagues describe recent work in tracking the spread of this important vector. Using newly available genomic techniques, they cross-referenced the historical divergence of A. aegypti populations with known records of ship movements and disease spread. The results paint a picture of a species that traversed slave and other trade routes to the New World and beyond. In this episode of BioScience Talks, Powell joins us to discuss his work and to elaborate on the evolution and movements of this deadly “domesticated” mosquito species.Source: https://www.aibs.org/last_img read more

Researchers outline targeted therapeutic strategy for triplenegative breast cancer

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Feb 26 2019Research team explores nanotechnology-based therapeutic strategy for triple-negative breast cancerNew findings put forth by the University of Maryland Fischell Department of Bioengineering (BIOE) and researchers from four other academic institutions outline a targeted therapeutic strategy to treat triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) – a potential first for the particularly aggressive form of breast cancer. As demonstrated in the group’s paper published today in Nature Nanotechnology, the proposed strategy centers on nanotechnology-based precision-targeting of a gene known as POLR2A.About 10 to 20 percent of breast cancers are considered triple-negative, which means that, unlike most breast cancers, this particular type is not fueled by the hormones estrogen or progesterone, nor by the HER2 protein.While treatments for most other forms of breast cancer work by targeting one of these three avenues, TNBC does not respond to modern hormonal therapies or medicines that target HER2 protein receptors. As such, most TNBC patients are limited to chemotherapy as their only systemic treatment option.”Due to the lack of a targeted therapy option, TNBC patients often face a poorer prognosis compared with patients of other types of breast cancer,” said BIOE Professor Xiaoming (Shawn) He, corresponding author of the paper. “While we have seen dramatic advancements in breast cancer treatment in recent decades, TNBC patients are typically treated with conventional chemotherapy that is often associated with adverse side effects, drug resistance, and even cancer relapse or recurrence. Therefore, it is of urgent need to develop targeted treatments for TNBC.”All cancers originate as the result of changes that have occurred within the genes of a cell or group of cells. In the case of triple-negative breast cancer, a gene known as TP53 is most frequently deleted or mutated.But, TP53 is critical. It provides instructions for making a protein called p53 that helps prevent the development of tumors by stopping cells with mutated or damaged DNA from growing and dividing uncontrollably. Although many researchers have considered techniques to restore p53 activity, no such therapy has been translated into the clinic, owing to the complexity of p53 signaling.Related StoriesNew study to ease plight of patients with advanced cancerSugary drinks linked to cancer finds studyTrends in colonoscopy rates not aligned with increase in early onset colorectal cancerRecognizing this, He and his research team have instead focused efforts on POLR2A – an essential neighboring gene of TP53. The group chose this route because genomic alterations tend to be large regional events in the body. Most cancers that lead to the loss of a particular tumor suppressor gene also lead to the partial loss of nearby genes such as POLR2A, a gene that is essential for any cell to survive.Although cancer cells can survive a partial loss of POLR2A, they become weakened and vulnerable to POLR2A inhibition. Knowing this, He and his research team hypothesized that targeted inhibition of POLR2A could potentially kill TNBC cells while sparing normal cells.To explore this option, the team looked to RNA interference (RNAi) with small interfering RNA (siRNA), a biological process by which RNA molecules inhibit gene expression or translation. This process can be used to precisely target virtually any genes – including those that may contribute to cancer growth.The challenge, however, is that siRNA is extremely unstable in blood and in endosomes and lysosomes, the digestive system of cells. To overcome these obstacles, the research group designed “nano-bomb” particles that they could use to protect POLR2A siRNA in blood circulation and carry the siRNA into the targeted tumor for cells to “eat.” The particles then generate CO2 gas to break open endosomes and lysosomes to ensure timely release of siRNA to inhibit POLR2A.The group believes that their findings offer hope that one day a nanotechnology-based precision-targeting strategy could be used to fight TNBC and many other types of cancer. Source:https://www.umdrightnow.umd.edu/last_img read more

Researchers find little evidence for connection between Chinese Famine and T2DM epidemic

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Mar 26 2019The Chinese Famine of 1959-61 has been widely interpreted as an important contributor to later epidemics of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitis (T2DM), but in re-examining 17 related Chinese studies researchers at Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health and Leiden University Medical Center, found little evidence for this association. The paper is published in Nature Reviews Endocrinology.”Most Chinese studies were limited in using appropriate age-balanced controls,” said L. H. Lumey, MD, professor of Epidemiology at Columbia Mailman School. “Therefore, establishing a firm connection between prenatal famine and T2DM in future studies in China will require significant improvements in study design and execution.”Related StoriesStudy: Antidepressants reduce mortality by 35% in patients with diabetesObese patients with Type 1 diabetes could safely receive robotic pancreas transplantDiabetes patients experiencing empathy from PCPs have beneficial long-term clinical outcomesTo demonstrate the limitation in the Chinese studies, the researchers re-analyzed published data using several control groups. With age-balanced controls, no increases were seen in T2DM.Lumey and colleagues further determined that studying just pre-famine births as controls could suggest a ‘protective’ effect of famine on later health outcomes. Studies from both the Dutch Famine and the Chinese Famine show that increased body size in adulthood has important implications for T2DM after prenatal famine exposure. “However our studies of the Dutch famine have not yet examined if changes in DNA methylation in individuals exposed during gestation could lead to ‘intergenerational’ effects, on the grandchildren, large enough to explain the increased obesity and hyperglycemia in China today,” said Dr Bastiaan T. Heijmans of Leiden University Medical Center in the Netherlands.Because of limitations in study design and the original analyses of the Chinese studies it is an open question if the famine has significantly contributed to the current epidemic in China. And accordingly, it is also not yet possible to make firm statements regarding the long-term impact of direct exposure or the intergenerational impact of indirect exposure.”The current T2DM epidemic in China represents an enormous public health challenge,” noted Lumey. “Public health efforts for prevention and treatment should therefore focus now on well-established risk factors for overweight and obesity, especially the increased intake of energy dense foods and sedentary lifestyles that affect the entire population, regardless of early famine exposure.” Source:https://www.mailman.columbia.edu/last_img read more

Understanding social psychological connections between people and physical environment

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)May 31 2019Societies and people have reshaped the world many times over. From building cities and communities that live within them, to the smaller changes in a person’s home or place of worship, people influence their space. Benjamin Meagher, a social psychologist at Hope College, argues that the space people shape, also shapes the individual, and that social psychology must take an “ecological” view of people in their environment.His work appears in a recently published paper in Personality and Social Psychology Review.Being in a certain location dramatically constrains or facilitates certain emotional experience (stepping into a quiet St. Patrick’s Cathedral from the busy streets of New York), our sense of connection with others (moving in with a romantic partner for the first time, or returning to your childhood home for a holiday), and our productivity and performance (the well-documented effected of home advantage in sports). For researchers, this means that understanding what role different places play in psychological experience is an important goal, because it can provide insights for better designing environments to promote psychological well-being and more positive social interaction.”It’s time for psychologists to move outside the head of the individual to consider the broader context in which psychological activity takes place,” says Meagher.Much of social and personality psychology research, and psychology in general, looks at how we feel and think in our minds, as well as how we react to specific situations, but Meagher suggests that we are often ignoring an equally important part of the health and wellbeing equation: our physical environment.Couples on CouchesRelated StoriesOnline training program helps managers to support employees’ mental health needsHospitals’ decision to transfer kids with mental health emergencies is based on insurance typeIt is okay for women with lupus to get pregnant with proper care, says new studyOne example Meagher offers is that of couples in their homes. One pair are film buffs, they’ve focused their resources to a comfy couch and a large screen. Another pair, into food, has focused much of their resources on a kitchen that allows them to cook unique meals. The changes the couple make to their homes reflect their personalities, but it will also reinforce those aspects of their personalities.Having a home that reflects a shared identity and facilitates joint activities can help support the couple. Yet, if the people in the partnership have different interests, trying to share the same space may cause conflict. Sometimes couples might even create their own spaces in such a situation. Meagher says that the “man cave” is one example of how people may strategically alter a physical environment in order to support a particular aspect of their personality that they may feel is otherwise hindered by their home.How people shape their spaces can also impact the psychological wellbeing beyond the individual.The Community ConnectionEarlier research on college dormitories, hospitals, and nursing homes has shown that certain designs such as suite vs. apartment layouts, influence how often people interact, and how much they feel like they belong in that community (Bronkema & Bowman, 2017; Devlin, Donovan, Nicolov, Nold, & Zandan, 2008; Dijkstra, Pieterse, & Pruyn, 2006; Ullán et al., 2012).By understanding the ecology of social interaction psychologists can help architects, city planners, interior designers, and other specialists in applied fields design places that can promote healthier behavior and more positive experiences among occupants. Doing so requires studying what patterns of interactions appear to be supported or inhibited by particular types of environmental design. There is no such thing as neutral, empty space-wherever you are, you are in a particular place that has psychological meaning.”Benjamin Meagher, a social psychologist at Hope Collegecenter_img Source:Society for Personality and Social Psychologylast_img read more

Facebook in fresh controversy over Holocaust denial

first_img Zuckerberg at center of Holocaust denial controversy (Update) Facebook found itself embroiled anew in controversy Thursday after chief executive Mark Zuckerberg argued the leading social network should not filter out posts denying the Holocaust. Credit: CC0 Public Domain © 2018 AFP This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.center_img Explore further Citation: Facebook in fresh controversy over Holocaust denial (2018, July 19) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-07-facebook-fresh-controversy-holocaust-denial.html The comments by Zuckerberg drew fierce criticism and appeared to undermine Facebook’s latest effort to root out hate speech, violence and misinformation on its platform.In an interview with tech website Recode on Wednesday, Zuckerberg said that while Facebook was dedicated to stopping the spread of fake news, it would not filter out posts just on the basis of being factually wrong—including from Holocaust deniers and the conspiracy theory website Infowars.”I’m Jewish, and there’s a set of people who deny that the Holocaust happened,” he said in the interview.”I find that deeply offensive. But at the end of the day, I don’t believe that our platform should take that down because I think there are things that different people get wrong. I don’t think that they’re intentionally getting it wrong.”Critics quickly lashed out at Zuckerberg over the comments, saying these kinds of comments can incite hatred and violence.”Holocaust denial is the quintessential ‘fake news,'” said Abraham Cooper of the Simon Wiesenthal Center, a rights group named for a famed Nazi hunter.”The Nazi Holocaust is the most documented atrocity in history, allowing the canard of Holocaust denial to be posted on Facebook, or any other social media platform cannot be justified in the name of ‘free exchange of ideas.'”Zeynep Tufekci, a University of North Carolina professor who follows social media said on Twitter: “Harder to find a group of people more *intentional* about “denying” an atrocity in order to pave the way for more violence than holocaust-deniers.”Zuckerberg later emailed Recode to clarify his comments, stating that if something is spreading and rated as false by the site’s fact checkers, “it would lose the vast majority of its distribution” on user feeds and that “if a post crossed line into advocating for violence or hate against a particular group, it would be removed.”Distraction from new effortThe episode was an unwelcome distraction for Facebook after it held a media briefing on the company’s new policy to remove bogus posts likely to spark violence.The new tactic being spread through the global social network was tested in Sri Lanka, which was recently rocked by inter-religious violence over false information posted on the platform.Jennifer Grygiel, a social media professor at Syracuse University, said that despite Facebook’s ramped up efforts it needs far more people to weed out posts that can be harmful on a platform with some two billion users worldwide.Zuckerberg “needs to figure out content moderation and he can’t do it without more people. This has life and death implications” Grygiel told AFP.”I don’t think he understand the decisions he makes has real-world implications for democracy.”Facebook has been blamed for failing to curb incitations to violence against the Rohingya Muslims in Myanmar and its WhatsApp messaging service has been implicated in lynchings and mob violence in India.The latest controversy comes with Facebook seeking to repair the damage from misinformation spread on the platform during the 2016 US election campaign and the hijacking of private data by consulting firm Cambridge Analytica as it worked on Donald Trump’s campaign.At the same time, Facebook has been accused by some politicians in Washington of bias in filtering out conservative voices.Some analysts said Facebook faces a difficult task in seeking to filter out misinformation and calls to violence and conform with regulations on hate speech in various countries while still remaining an open platform that allows free speech.”Facebook is in over its head but nobody has a full answer,” said Tufekci in a tweet.Fellow North Carolina professor Daniel Kreiss responded by saying “the issues are *really* challenging—a big problem is that FB never thought about any of the implications of its platform, data, speech policies, or misinformation before 2016, even as many of us were raising concerns.”last_img read more

EU is unimpressed by threats of nodeal Brexit BBC

first_imgLONDON (Reuters) – The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator said in an interview to be published on Thursday that he was unimpressed by threats of no-deal Brexit but that if the United Kingdom opted for such a course it would have to face the consequences. FILE PHOTO: EU chief Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier speaks during a news conference at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Nicosia, Cyprus May 20, 2019. REUTERS/Yiannis KourtoglouAsked by the BBC what would happen if London tore up its EU membership card, Michel Barnier said: “The UK will have to face the consequences.” “I think that the UK side, which is well informed and competent and knows the way we work on the EU side, knew from the very beginning that we’ve never been impressed by such a threat,” Barnier said. “It’s not useful to use it”. Barnier spoke to the BBC before Britain’s Conservative Party leadership contest. Boris Johnson, who is the frontrunner in the contest to replace Prime Minister Theresa May, has pledged to leave the EU with or without a deal on Oct. 31. If Johnson wins, the three-year Brexit crisis could deepen as the EU has refused to countenance changing the Withdrawal Agreement and the British parliament could try to block a no-deal Brexit. Barnier said the Withdrawal Agreement “is the only way to leave the EU in an orderly manner”. EU Commission’s first vice-president, Frans Timmermans, told the BBC that UK ministers were “running around like idiots” when they arrived to negotiate Brexit in 2017. Timmermans said he was shocked by the standard of the British negotiation after initially expecting a brilliant show. “We thought they are so brilliant,” he said. “That in some vault somewhere in Westminster there will be a Harry Potter-like book with all the tricks and all the things in it to do.” But then: “I thought, ‘Oh my God, they haven’t got a plan, they haven’t got a plan.’” “Time’s running out and you don’t have a plan. It’s like Lance Corporal Jones, you know, ‘Don’t panic, don’t panic!’ Running around like idiots.” Reporting by Guy Faulconbridge; editing by Costas PitasOur Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.last_img read more