Virgin Strikes Back

first_imgVirgin Australia has blamed Qantas’ policy of maintaining its 65 per cent market share for its [Qantas’] woes and accused it of stifling real competition.In an open letter to the Australian government, to counter Qantas’ lobbying for help, Virgin Australia chief executive John Borghetti said the airline’s strategy is, and always has been, to bring strong competition to all sectors of the Australian market, not to destroy competition.Qantas is trying to stop Virgin Australia’s foreign airline shareholders from injecting $350 million into the airline suggesting those funds are bankrolling an unrealistic fare war and expansion.The airline is looking to the government for a [bank] guarantee ahead of what is expected to be a loss of up to $500 million for the 2014 financial year.However Mr Borghetti has hit back saying its strategy has been to bring “real competition to all sectors of the market, including regional monopoly routes.”“This is despite our competitor publically stating that “if a competitor puts one [plane] in, we’ll put two in as a group”, in order to maintain a 65 per cent share of the Australian domestic aviation market at all costs,” said Mr Borghetti.Mr Borghetti said that “this is a strategy that prevents competition including the possibility of new entrants.”“We strongly believe that a level playing field should include a full and proper investigation of this 65 per cent “line in the sand” policy and ask the Australian Government to divert attention to this important issue that is crippling competition and is not sustainable financially for anyone in aviation in this country.”Mr Borghetti said Virgin had no problem with the Qantas Sale Act, which restricts foreign ownership in Qantas, being repealed or amendments to the legislation which would allow Qantas to mirror the current structure of Virgin Australia by separating its international and domestic operations.Under Australian law an Australian domestic carrier can be foreign owned.“If Australia truly wants a “level playing field”, then any measures that the Government plans to take to support Qantas should be offered to Virgin Australia,” said Mr Borghetti.“We believe that this country needs at least two strong airlines, in order to ensure the travelling public is not faced with high airfares and restricted choice.”Yesterday Qantas chief executive Alan Joyce likened the spat between the two airlines to a soccer game in which Qantas was 10-nil up before Virgin had called three other teams onto the field ‘‘because they can’t beat us.’’‘‘We need a level playing field for the Qantas Group to have a future. Virgin does its heavy maintenance offshore. They don’t have these investments that we do in this country.’’Mr Borghetti said that Virgin Australia employs around 9,500 staff, has opened new routes, launched new bases and grown tourism through joint campaigns with the state tourism bodies and Tourism Australia.“We fly around 20 million passengers annually and we have injected over $11 billion directly into the Australian economy over the last three years.”“We have also purchased Skywest and 60 per cent of Tigerair Australia, with a view of strengthening their ability to compete”And in a sting aimed at Qantas’ offshore forays with Jetstar he added that “importantly, we will not be investing in starting new airlines offshore.”last_img read more

Alf Kumalo: South Africa loses a hero

first_img22 October 2012Less than a week before the passing of one of South Africa’s longest serving photojournalists, Alf Kumalo, MediaClubSouthAfrica.com spoke to his eldest daughter Sibusiso, and the curator of the photography museum he founded.Kumalo died at age 82 at the Charlotte Maxeke hospital in Johannesburg, on Sunday 21 October after struggling with prostate cancer. He enjoyed a long and eventful career spanning over six decades, eloquently capturing South Africa’s progression from apartheid state to a democracy.Sibusiso referred to her father as a people’s person who would always tell stories – generally funny ones – about his work.“I remember him telling me how he was not allowed to take pictures during the Soweto riots of the 1980s,” she recalled, “and he learned to balance the camera on his head so, using a self-timer, he could shoot without using his hands.”Sibusiso was born in 1969 but only lived with her father for nine years until 1978 when her parents divorced.She expressed her gratitude for the time the two of them spent healing old wounds. “I am glad to have had a relationship with him where we ironed out old issues before he was on his death bed.”Tributes pour inPresident Jacob Zuma said in a statement that South Africa had lost an outstanding individual.“He was a meticulous photographer and his work will live on forever as a monument to the people’s resilience and fortitude in the face of colonial oppression and apartheid,” Zuma said.In a tribute issued by the Nelson Mandela Centre of Memory on Monday morning, spokesperson Sello Hatang reflected on Kumalo’s career, which began in earnest in 1951 and mirrored the rise of Mandela’s own political career.“He was one of South Africa’s most eminent photographers and one who closely documented the life of Nelson Mandela both before and after his imprisonment,” Hatang said.“Bra Alf photographed many of the historic events in which Mandela played a key role, including the Treason and Rivonia trials.”From the time Mandela was sentenced in 1962 to five years in jail and then to life in 1964, he added, Kumalo continued to photograph the struggle against apartheid and, importantly, to visually record the life of Mandela’s family.Former ambassador to the UN Dumisani Kumalo, a cousin of the late photographer, told The Times newspaper that he had not been well for a while.“We lost a hero. We lost a great man and a brother and a pillar in our family,” said Kumalo.Six decades of photographyKumalo’s is credited with some of the country’s most captivating photography that captured numerous historic events from as early on as the 1950s.It was after he freelanced for Bantu World newspaper – which later became known as The World – and worked for Golden City Post that he began to rise to prominence, and especially during his tenure at Drum magazine in the 1960s.Kumalo entered and won his first photographic competition in 1963, and the announcement reached him while he was in London covering a Mohammad Ali fight.He had entered under his African names Mangaliso Dukuza, because he wanted the judging to be impartial and not influenced by his already-flourishing reputation.Other momentous events captured by Kumalo include the infamous student uprising of 1976, the release of Mandela from prison in 1990, negotiations at the Convention for a Democratic South Africa – often referred to in local media as the “Codesa talks” – and the former president’s inauguration as South Africa’s first black head of state in 1994.A solo exhibition of his life’s work took place at the 59th session of the UN General Assembly in September 2004.In the same year Kumalo received the Order of Ikhamanga in silver for his contribution to documentary photography and journalism in the country. The award is presented by the president in recognition of South Africans who have excelled in the fields of arts, culture, literature, music, journalism or sport.His work has appeared on international publications including Britain’s Observer, the New York Times and the New York Post and Ireland’s Sunday Independent. Passing on his skillsIn 2002 Kumalo opened the doors to a school of photography, which he operated from what used to be his house in Diepkloof, for the benefit of previously disadvantaged youngsters who aspire to follow in his footsteps. There is also a museum with his works on the premises, where Jabu Perreira works as a full-time curator.“Personally I think his portraits are the best,” he told our journalist. “The good thing about Alf’s work during the apartheid era is that his talent came from inside and his subjects felt relaxed with him behind the lens.”Because of a lack of funds, the school has not been able to enrol new students for several years. It was initially funded by a grant from Movimondo, an Italian NGO involved in the field of photography.“Bra Alf would be invited to events as a VIP, but he would end up taking photos and engaging with the masses instead,” said Perreira.Kumalo’s vision for the museum, which is currently being renovated, was to create an artistic space for people who are in the arts.“We want to host film screenings, exhibitions and seminars on photography to attract an audience to the museum,” said Perreira.First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

South Africa steps up fight against TB

first_img26 March 2013 Deputy President Kgalema Motlanthe handed over six state-of-the-art tuberculosis (TB) testing machines at Pollsmoor Prison in Cape Town on Monday, World TB Day, as South Africa stepped up its efforts to fight TB in prisons, mines and schools across the country. The GeneXpert machine reduces the time needed to diagnose the presence of TB from about six weeks to two hours, thereby allowing medical staff to treat patients sooner and to stop the disease from spreading. “We are prioritising the roll-out of these machines in correctional facilities, mining and other congregate areas with elevated risks of infection,” Motlanthe said, adding that the government believed in returning rehabilitated offenders to society as healthy and responsible community members. South Africa is facing a big challenge from HIV and TB co-infections. TB is an airborne, opportunistic infection that thrives in the presence of a weakened immune system. “We have today opted to join the Correctional Services’ communities to entrench the anti-stigma message that HIV and TB do not discriminate, and therefore our responses shouldn’t, either,” Motlanthe said. Health Minister Aaron Motsoaledi, who was also present at Monday’s handover, underlined the extent of the stigma associated with TB, citing a recent survey in Khayelitsha in which 2 721 people from 2 037 households visited were screened. While 650 suspicious cases had been detected, only 300 people had been prepared to give sputum for testing, Motsoaledi noted. Thirteen of them had been found to have TB and had started treatment. It’s estimated that nine-million people across the world have TB, with 28 percent of this total living in six Southern African Development Community (SADC) member countries. South Africa has the third highest tuberculosis infection rate in the world. But Motsoaledi was optimistic that South Africa would reach its Millennium Development Goal of halving TB infections by 50 percent in the 1 000 days left before the target date of 2015. At Pollsmoor Prison, where former President Nelson Mandela spent six of his 27 years in prison, 735 inmates were screened for TB between 1 and 31 March this year. Ten of them were diagnosed with TB, while 165 who were suspected of having the disease underwent more tests. Twenty-one of this group also tested positive for TB. “Everyone who has TB can possibly infect 20 others in one year. They’ve saved at least 400 others from getting TB,” Motsoaledi said, adding that prisoners were also given a booklet educating them about TB, HIV and sexually transmitted diseases. Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

Ready, Set, Go!

first_imgWhen I was a kid, every race started with those three words. What do they mean, anyway? They mean that some things need to happen before a process really takes off. An integrated design process is no exception.Getting ready means, first of all, ensuring that the right people are literally at the table. I talked about who the “right people” are in my March 4 blog “Pensive About Process.” After that it means making sure everyone is in agreement about what’s going to happen and how. So before getting into substantive design discussions, some other conversations need to take place.The spirit of the processIntegrated design can seem messy, perhaps circular, even a bit chaotic — but it’s ultimately more efficient because decisions are made based on the collective experience and wisdom of your team. This means preparing them, if they’re new to this, to be tolerant as the process unfolds. Everyone learns together, and an important part of the learning relates to how the work of each contributor overlaps and intersects with the work of others. Understanding and appreciating this benefit are critical to your team members’ willing participation.Most design professionals have experienced having a decision reversed by someone else, often without being given the opportunity to explain what lay behind the decision. An integrated design process aims to ensure that everyone whose knowledge bears on a decision participates in its making. This saves time, respects everyone’s wisdom, avoids the ill will that accompanies second-guessing, and results in greater stability of decisions once they’re made.What’s done differentlyIn a traditional design process, each contributor executes his or her work sequentially: The architect fashions “the design;” the structural engineer figures out how to make it stand up; the mechanical designer works out how to keep it comfortable (or at least not too uncomfortable); the landscape designer creates the planting plan; and so forth. Each one typically copes as best as he/she can with what was done before, even if it means compromising his work. Only when something is seriously amiss do we actually go back and ask for work to be redone. That’s simply not acceptable!In an integrated design process, as Annette Stelmack described in a recent blog, the whole team (or as much of it as possible) gathers early on, and then repeatedly as the design evolves, to ensure that all are benefitting from their colleagues’ experience and insights. For example, a landmark “aha!” from an integrated design process occurred when one of the early Building America teams figured out — because all the right people were at the table — that if they improved the insulation and windows enough, they could downsize the mechanical equipment, and the savings would pay for the upgraded envelope. That insight has now become a standard for the energy efficiency community. Other such lessons lie ahead.last_img read more

Significant Digits For Thursday March 24 2016

This is Significant Digits, your daily digest of the telling numbers tucked inside the news. With Walt Hickey away on vacation — and with the third round of the NCAA men’s basketball tournament getting underway tonight — I’m hijacking SigDig today and tomorrow in the name of March Madness. Enjoy! 6 ACC schoolsSix schools in the Sweet 16 — Duke, Miami, North Carolina, Virginia, Notre Dame and Syracuse — hail from the Atlantic Coast Conference, setting a record (at least, since the NCAA Tournament expanded to 64 teams in 1985). The ACC had tied the previous record of five last season, so at this rate they’ll claim all 16 slots by 2026. [USA Today]24.5 pointsIn their two NCAA Tournament wins thus far, Villanova has outscored foes by 49 combined points, or 24.5 per game — more than any other team in the Sweet 16 field. Granted, one of those games was against 15th-seeded UNC Asheville, but the Wildcats also beat No. 7 seed Iowa by 19 and have exceeded the scoring margin our Elo ratings would expect by 11.8 points per contest. They’ll try to keep that hot streak going tonight against Miami. [Sports-Reference.com]63 pointsOklahoma’s Buddy Hield has enjoyed a season for the ages this year, and it’s carrying over into the NCAA Tournament, where he’s scored a tourney-best 63 points (31.5 per game) on a scorching 73.2 true shooting percentage. But maybe it’s best for the Sooners if Hield doesn’t keep that average up against Texas A&M tonight — Oklahoma was 4-5 in conference play this season when Hield scored 30 or more points, and 8-1 when the Sooner scoring attack was more balanced. [Sports-Reference.com]5 startersEach basketball team has five starters, and in the case of Maryland’s game against Kansas tonight, each Terrapin starter will be taller than the Jayhawk lined up across from him at tip-off. As a team, Maryland has the fourth-biggest roster in the nation, with an average height a good inch and a half taller than Kansas. But will it matter against the skilled Jayhawks? Our model says “probably not” — we’ve got Kansas favored with a 73 percent probability of winning, despite Maryland’s size advantage. [KC Kingdom]109th bestIf defense really does win championships, nobody clued in Oregon or Duke. The combatants in tonight’s late game ranked 43rd and 109th, respectively, in schedule-adjusted defensive efficiency this season, per Ken Pomeroy’s stats. Aside from their 116th-place finish in 2013-14, this year’s Blue Devils have given Coach K more defensive fits than any Duke squad since Pomeroy started crunching numbers 15 seasons ago. [KenPom.com]More than $30 millionWith those aforementioned six entries in the Sweet 16, the ACC stands to make a cool $30 million, at least, from an NCAA cash pool that rewards conferences when their teams go deep in the tournament. Naturally, none of that money will ever be seen by Brice Johnson, Malcolm Brogdon, Grayson Allen, Angel Rodriguez or any of the other players who powered those teams to the Sweet 16. [ESPN.com]If you haven’t already, you really need to sign up for the Significant Digits newsletter — be the first to learn about the numbers behind the news.If you see a significant digit in the wild, send it to @WaltHickey — or to @Neil_Paine, I guess, if you want.CORRECTION (March 24, 5:35 p.m.): A previous version of this article incorrectly described the average height difference between the starters on Kansas and Maryland’s men’s basketball teams. Maryland’s starters are, on average, about an inch and a half taller, not a foot and half. read more

Commentary Cleveland Browns need to pick a QB and stick with him

Cleveland Browns quarterback Brian Hoyer (6) is run down by Buffalo Bills linebacker Kiko Alonso as he scrambles toward the sideline during first-quarter action at FirstEnergy Stadium in Cleveland Oct. 3.Credit: Courtesy of MCTIn 1996 the Cleveland Browns were forcefully relocated to Baltimore and renamed the Ravens by owner Art Modell, also known as Cleveland’s most hated man, save for, perhaps, LeBron James.In 1999 the NFL held true to its promise of bringing football back to Cleveland and the Browns returned as an expansion team.Since then, the Ravens have gone on to win two Super Bowls while the Browns have managed a whopping one playoff appearance, of which the team lost in the first round.During the time since that 1999 season the Ravens have fielded 13 starting quarterbacks. While still high, that number pales in comparison to Cleveland’s 19 signal callers in said period.Over that time, only one quarterback has started all 16 games in a single season for Cleveland: Tim Couch during the 2001 campaign. That year also marked one of only three times the Browns finished a year 7-9 or better. The other two times you ask? In 2002, when Couch started 14 games and 2007, when Derek Anderson started 15. Anderson got the nod halfway through the season opener.The biggest difference between the old Browns (Baltimore) and the new Browns (Cleveland) is stability at the quarterback position. The Ravens have had a quarterback start all 16 games seven times since 1999, including five straight seasons out of their current quarterback, Joe Flacco.It is time for the Browns to commit, and that can’t happen if they hire a new coach and draft a new “quarterback of the future” every few years.Cleveland has three options at the position right now. It can ride it out with 29-year-old second-year quarterback Brandon Weeden, who has shown flashes but may be too far away from stardom considering his old-age. The Browns could wait out the rest of the season with Weeden, then fully commit to the currently injured but promising Brian Hoyer.Or they could draft a quarterback in 2014.Some might argue they could pick up a free agent like Matt Flynn, but a player who has failed to capitalize on the QB situations in Seattle and Oakland has to have some issues. Keeping Weeden, waiting for Hoyer or signing Flynn are the only viable options in Cleveland, and they must pick one right away in order to have any chance at stability.For me, the best choice is Hoyer. Weeden has talent, but he has a knack for playing game to game, there is no consistency so far, plus he is nearly 30. Hoyer is two years younger and spent three seasons learning under Tom Brady with the New England Patriots. While he has made a grand total of two starts in his Cleveland career, Hoyer won both of them and provided hope for a fan base that has been searching for a spark for nearly two decades.In past seasons I might choose the “draft a new guy” option, but I do not see anyone in the upcoming draft that I would commit to from day one, and that is what Cleveland has to do.No more quarterback battles in training camp. No more drafting of a Couch or a Brady Quinn, no more gambles on a too-old rookie like Weeden. It’s time for Cleveland to pick a player, give him the job and stick with him through thick and thin.Without stability the Browns will continue to be one of the laughing-stocks of the NFL, and the blame can only be placed on themselves. read more

Football Talent remains with Ohio State defensive ends despite depth departure

Ohio State freshman defensive end Chase Young (2) sacks Maryland quarterback Caleb Rowe and forces a fumble during the Ohio State-Maryland game on Oct. 7. Ohio State won 62-14. Credit: Jack Westerheide | Photo EditorThere was a case to be made that Ohio State’s defensive end depth in 2017 was as strong as any in college football. It could even have been the best of the past several seasons.It not only had the 2016 Big Ten Defensive Lineman of the Year in Tyquan Lewis, but also the 2017 winner in Nick Bosa, as well as future NFL draft selections Jalyn Holmes and Sam Hubbard. Waiting behind the four starters were a pair of former top defensive end prospects in five-star freshman Chase Young and four-star redshirt freshman Jonathon Cooper, both of whom spelled the starters when needed.That depth was envious in 2017. It will not be there in 2018.Ohio State lost Hubbard to the draft while Holmes and Lewis both graduated, leaving Bosa, Young and Cooper as the only returning players at defensive end.“We’ll find some guys to play with them,” defensive line coach Larry Johnson said after the Cotton Bowl. “We’ll make some changes. We’ll make sure those guys have a chance to be fresh. We’re a long ways away from that, but I think we’ll be OK.”The concern with Ohio State’s defensive end group will not come from the talent present. Bosa and Young could be a dynamic pairing at the top, potentially the most explosive duo in college football, if the talent they have shown in the past continues in 2018. Cooper will present the Buckeyes with a strong third option in the rotation.And even though Young and Cooper have only part of one season full of garbage time minutes under their belts, they both feel ready to step into larger roles in the 2018 season.“I think we were prepared right now,” Young said after the Cotton Bowl. “But even this spring and this winter and the summer, it’s going to get us, and after all three of those [seasons], man, I think we going to be there. Just watch out.”The depth from there takes a bit of a hit and will remain questionable heading into the season.Since the bowl game in December, Ohio State has a clearer vision of who will be able to provide backup to next year’s starters. The Buckeyes brought in defensive end recruits four-star Tyreke Smith, four-star Tyler Friday and three-star Alex Williams. However, Friday will be making the change from defensive tackle to end while Williams might get a shot at playing tight end in college.Even with the recruits coming in, it seems unlikely any of them will have extended roles. None are as highly regarded as Young coming out of high school. Young appeared in 10 games and had 3.5 sacks while Cooper played in nine games.Still, that playing time proved valuable for the pair. It was given chances to play against collegiate competition — though almost always toward the end of blowouts. Bosa remembers that even when the game was not on the line, the playing time was important for his own development.“My freshman year, I was able to play a decent amount,” Bosa said. “Just get that big game experience. Just get used to the speed of the game. It’s a lot different than high school and you just learn a lot when you actually get in there, you can’t really replicate it in practice.”The recruits could be thrust into playing time due to the lack of depth, but none are expected to have Young’s impact. He demonstrated speed and elusiveness during his freshman season that has convinced the Buckeyes he will be a force when he steps into a starting role for Ohio State.Cooper’s name often gets lost in the shuffle — overlooked in favor of Bosa and Young — when looking ahead to 2018. Cooper did not have as much impactful playing time as Young in 2017 and had just two sacks. But the players all believe he has the chance to be another top option for the Buckeyes when they need relief.“If you name me and Nick, you’ve got to name Coop too,” Young said after the Cotton Bowl. “Coop, his motor is unreal and I don’t think guys have seen a lot of him this year, but like I said with [defensive tackle] Davon Hamilton, you going to see a lot of him next year, you going to see what he brings to the table.”Ohio State is going to have to deal with a lack of depth, but there is still plenty of talent at defensive end. With Young, Bosa and Cooper, the Buckeyes have a formidable trio that should present challenges to opposing offensive lines, just like they did in 2017.“I think it could be the best pass-rushing unit ever,” Bosa said on Jan. 19. “I think it could be a step up from last year just because they’ve really set the bar for us and we’re going to enhance it and just so much talent on this D-line right now, even though we’re young. Some of the best talent that I’ve ever seen, so it’s going to be really good once we get all the chemistry together.” read more

BSE closes points 33758 up on June 24

first_imgBSE closes points 337.58 up on June 24707 views00:00 / 00:00- 00:00:0000:00BSE closes points 337.58 up on June 24707 viewsBusinessNew Delhi, June 24 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 337.58 points up to stand at 25,368.90. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed 86.85 points up to stand at 7,580.20. Petronet LNG and Gujarat State Petronet Ltd. were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 7.73% and 7.58% along with HPCL and Jubilant FoodWorks Ltd. with an increase of 7.10% and 6.97% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include MCX and Piramal Enterprises Ltd. with a decrease of 3.07% and 2.87% along with Marico and Kotak Mah Bank with a decrease of 2.08% and 1.70% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is up 182.10 points at 15,169.33 while the banking sector is up 261.60 points at 17,534.65 and the realty sector is up 63.62 points at 2,078.65. The Indian currency is down 0.12% at Rs 60.13 per dollar.Ventuno Web Player 4.50New Delhi, June 24 (ANI): Trading at the Bombay Stock Exchange today closed 337.58 points up to stand at 25,368.90. At the National Stock Exchange the Nifty closed 86.85 points up to stand at 7,580.20. Petronet LNG and Gujarat State Petronet Ltd. were among the top gainers of Group A with an increase of 7.73% and 7.58% along with HPCL and Jubilant FoodWorks Ltd. with an increase of 7.10% and 6.97% respectively, while the top losers of Group A include MCX and Piramal Enterprises Ltd. with a decrease of 3.07% and 2.87% along with Marico and Kotak Mah Bank with a decrease of 2.08% and 1.70% at the close of the markets. The Auto sector is up 182.10 points at 15,169.33 while the banking sector is up 261.60 points at 17,534.65 and the realty sector is up 63.62 points at 2,078.65. The Indian currency is down 0.12% at Rs 60.13 per dollar.last_img read more

May 4 2003 RICHIE HAVENS The concert season at A

first_imgMay 4, 2003RICHIE HAVENS: The concert season at Arcosanti started with a wonderful performance by Richie Havens. [Photo: Henry Diltz & text: sa] For each concert/dinner combination, the audience is invited to arrive before dinner for a special tour. [Photo & text: sa] The cafe is nicely prepared for the concert dinner. Set-up crew and serving staff [from left] Roma Tre student Francesca Venturoni, April workshopper Robert Clyde, maintenance staff member Gwen Birk, Roma Tre student Chiara Voicu and Italian Project staff member Matteo di Michele. [Photo & text: sa] Chef Jim Powell directs the set-up of the serving line. The menu for the evening is: Chickenbreast sauteed with Rosemary and Thyme, Tempeh sauteed with Cilantro and Cremini Mushrooms, Jasmine Rice, Eggplant roasted in Olive Oil and steamed Asparagus with roasted Red Pepper Sauce. The dessert was Rasberry Sorbet served with Anise and Mint Dark Chocolate. [Photo & text: sa] The serving crew is in place and ready for action. [Photo & text: sa] Appreciative comments could be heard throughout the diningroom. Dinner was delicious. [Photo & text: sa] Richie Havens arrived in the early afternoon and spend some warm-up time with his accompanist Walter Parks. [Photo & text: sa] [Photo: sa] [Photos: sa] The concert was well received. Richie Havens entertained the crowd with thoughtful songs and some very funny stories. It was a pleasure to attend another well organized event at Arcosanti. [Photo & text: sa]last_img read more

Liberty Globalowned Swiss cable operator UPC Cabl

first_imgLiberty Global-owned Swiss cable operator UPC Cablecom has acquired the local fibre network in the St Gallen municipality of Uznach.The network, which was previously owned by the Uznachcable cooperative will pass to UPC Cablecom’s control as of January 1.UPC Cablecom already cooperates with Uznachcable. The deal means that Uznach residents will be able to access a full range of Cablecom services. The local network already offers over 65 digital television channels, including 40 in HD, more than 170 digital radio stations, and a 2 Mbps internet connection including a free modem.The deal adds 2,400 subscribers to UPC Cablecom’s base.“We would like to thank the uznachcable cooperative for the successful and mutually rewarding cooperation over the years. We are delighted that, as of 1 January 2015, the some 2,400 subscribers in Uznach will be able to benefit from all of our innovative products and services and have secured themselves access to the future of telecommunications and entertainment,” said Ivan Nash Vila, CFO at UPC Cablecom.last_img read more