3 days agoMoyes tells Man Utd ace Pogba to stay put

first_imgTagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your say Moyes tells Man Utd ace Pogba to stay putby Paul Vegas3 days agoSend to a friendShare the lovePaul Pogba should stay with Manchester United, says former United boss David Moyes.The France international revealed in the summer he’s ready for a new challenge elsewhere.Moyes told talkSPORT: “Pogba is still Manchester United’s best midfield player and I think Pogba can play for any team in the world. He’d get a game for any team.“I’m not sure he’s a player who is consistent and makes a difference all the time.“I think for the profile he’s got, you hope he makes the difference. He doesn’t always do that for me.“But I think he should stay at Manchester United.“I don’t think he wins games like Messi does for Barcelona or Ronaldo’s done for Juventus.“He’s a really talented player and he’s got a lot to give.“His best for me was then he was at Juventus. He joined in more and got closer to the opposition box. Pogba is at his best getting near the box and trying to score a few goals.“If you were picking United’s team, I still think that Pogba would be in their midfield.” last_img read more

Overhaul Ontario corrections system to emphasize human rights adviser

first_imgTORONTO – Most people in Ontario’s jails are held in maximum security, subject to regular and possibly unconstitutional strip searches, and without access to rehabilitation programming, according to an independent corrections adviser.Howard Sapers released a report Tuesday painting a picture of a system in need of an overhaul to emphasize human rights, and that lacks the proper tools to address Indigenous overrepresentation and full oversight when inmates die in custody.Sapers’ 62 recommendations include calling for a new Corrections Act to address legal gaps in Ontario’s system.“Dignity, respect and legality are integral to the delivery of correctional services,” Sapers said. “When paired with evidence-based correctional practice and the principles such as restraint in the use of state authority and a default to the least restrictive measure, the outcome is safe, effective corrections.”Corrections Minister Marie-France Lalonde said the government will address all of Sapers’ recommendations and will introduce new corrections legislation this fall.“We recognize that the current legislative framework contains little direction on many of the issues that Mr. Sapers has raised, issues such as how and when searches take place, who responds to inmates’ complaints and the conditions of confinement within our institutions,” she said. “These issues are of fundamental importance to both inmates and staff.”Ontario is one of the only provinces without a law curbing the use of strip searches in jails, despite the charter strictly limiting the “degrading” practice, Sapers said.Not only does the province have no law to address it, but government policy actually requires Ontario’s jails to carry out regular, routine strip searches of all inmates on a biweekly basis and daily for inmates in segregation, he found. Nearly all other provinces and the federal system place limitations on strip searches, he said.About two-thirds of the people in Ontario’s correctional institutions are on remand, meaning they are legally innocent, but the conditions under which they are held don’t reflect that, Sapers found. Almost all are held under maximum security conditions, which leads to limited access to programs, Sapers said.Ontario has no minimum security provincial jails.The province should explore non-institutional forms of pre-trial detention and establish minimum and medium institutions, Sapers recommended.Lalonde has previously announced that new jails will be built to replace existing facilities in Ottawa and Thunder Bay that have come under fire in recent years for overcrowding and infrastructure concerns. She suggested Tuesday that the new facilities won’t be maximum security by default.Sapers said the “vast majority” of inmates in Ontario don’t have access to effective discharge planning or supported gradual release. Discharge plans are only directed for inmates serving between 30 days and six months, leaving out people serving more or less time or on remand.As well, temporary absences can be powerful reintegration tools, but Ontario has dramatically decreased its usage of them over the last few decades, Sapers said. The vast majority of such passes for rehabilitative purposes — for work, education or community programming — go to people serving intermittent sentences, who already spend weekdays in the community, he found.New corrections legislation should expand the use of temporary absences, Sapers recommended.More than 150 people have died in Ontario’s correctional institutions over the last decade, but Sapers’ team couldn’t find definitive figures, he said. Most deaths were due to natural causes and therefore not subject to a full, arm’s-length review, because in 2009, the government removed a requirement for a mandatory coroner’s inquest for such deaths, Sapers said.All in-custody natural deaths should require an inquest, he recommended.Sapers also found there is almost no law in Ontario directing how inmate complaints should be handled. Most institutions don’t have dedicated complaint forms, inmates generally aren’t given a copy of their complaint, and the vast majority are not centrally collected or tracked.Indigenous people make up about two per cent of Ontario’s population but 13 per cent of provincial inmates, Sapers said. The ministry should establish a separate Indigenous policy and programs division, he recommended.“It is questionable whether, in the absence of a central and permanent Indigenous division with dedicated, high-ranking leadership and decision-making authority, the necessary fundamental change will occur,” Sapers wrote.last_img read more

Walmart ends involvement in program for people with intellectual disabilities

first_imgMONTREAL – Walmart Canada has confirmed it is ending its involvement with a Quebec program that provides job training to people with intellectual disabilities and those on the autism spectrum.Company spokesperson Anika Malik confirmed in an email Friday that the program, which was in place in several stores, will be phased out in the coming weeks.“We are pleased to have been able to collaborate over the years with these organizations and to allow program participants to gain new knowledge and opportunities to grow,” she said.“However, after analysis, we had to make the difficult decision to terminate Walmart’s partnership in the professional training program.”She said the decision was made after a review that took into account legislative changes and Walmart’s own policies.Walmart has been facing criticism over the decision since a health agency in the Mauricie region alerted the media to the job losses.While some social media users and organizations representing people with disabilities have denounced the company, others have said it should be commended for having participated for so many years.Malik insisted the decision did not amount to firing the employees, even though they are losing their positions.“These people participated in a voluntary program coordinated by local agencies who partnered with our stores to provide an environment in which they could get involved,” she said.The company would not confirm how many people will be affected by the change.last_img read more

British Columbia Utilities Commission issued final report onGasoline and Diesel Prices in

first_imgThe BCUC also received more than 70 letters of comment from members of the public and interested parties as well as three reports prepared by two independent consultants, shares the BCUC.The process also included four days of Oral Workshops for the Panel to ask Interveners questions, and for Interveners to ask questions on the independent reports.The Panel has recommended a one-month comment period on the Report to provide the Inquiry’s participants with an opportunity to submit additional evidence relevant to questions posed by the BC Government.To review the Panel’s detailed findings, refer to the Executive Summary or Final Report; CLICK HEREThe BCUC shares a final copy of the report has been provided to the Honourable Minister of Jobs, Trade and Technology. VANCOUVER, B.C. – The British Columbia Utilities Commission (BCUC) issued its Final Report with responses to questions posed by the Provincial Government and its key findings from its Inquiry into Gasoline and Diesel Prices in BC.Following the inquiry process, some of the Panel’s key findings include;There is a significant unexplained difference of approximately 13 cents per litre in wholesale gasoline prices between Southern BC and its Pacific Northwest cost comparator;The wholesale market for gasoline in BC is not truly competitive with high market concentration levels, high barriers to entry, and their ability to influence prices. Retail market prices can also be controlled by five refiner-marketers;There is no evidence to suggest that there is collusion among the retail operators nor is there evidence of cartel behaviour; andRegulation could potentially reduce the wholesale and/or retail margins to what is earned in comparable jurisdictions and reduce price volatility. However, further investigation should be done to determine if such an approach would be of benefit to British Columbian consumers.According to the BCUC, they established an independent, transparent and public inquiry process. The Panel considered evidence filed by 11 registered interveners including all major companies that have refining and retail business in BC.last_img read more

Stomach issues signal future mental problems

first_imgChildren who face adversities – such as parental separation – are more likely to suffer from gastrointestinal symptoms which may lead to mental health issues in later life, a study has found. The study, published in the journal Development and Psychopathology, found that gastrointestinal symptoms in children may have an impact on the brain and behaviour as they grow to maturity. “One common reason children show up at doctors’ offices is intestinal complaints,” said Nim Tottenham, a professor at Columbia University in the US. “Our findings indicate that gastrointestinal symptoms in young children could be a red flag to primary care physicians for future emotional health problems,” said Tottenham. Scientists have long noted the strong connection between the gut and brain. Previous research has demonstrated that a history of trauma or abuse has been reported in up to half of adults with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), at a prevalence twice that of patients without IBS. “The role of trauma in increasing vulnerability to both gastrointestinal and mental health symptoms is well established in adults but rarely studied in childhood,” said Bridget Callaghan, a post-doctoral research fellow at Columbia. Animal studies have demonstrated that adversity-induced changes in the gut microbiome influence neurological development, but no human studies have done so. “Our study is among the first to link disruption of a child’s gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity with brain activity in regions associated with emotional health.” The researchers focused on development in children who experienced extreme psychosocial deprivation due to institutional care before international adoption. Separation of a child from a parent is known to be a powerful predictor of mental health issues in humans. That experience, when modelled in rodents, induces fear and anxiety, hinders neurodevelopment and alters microbial communities across the lifespan. The researchers drew upon data from 115 children adopted from orphanages or foster care on or before approximately they were two years old, and from 229 children raised by a biological caregiver. The children with past caregiving disruptions showed higher levels of symptoms that included stomach aches, constipation, vomiting and nausea. From that sample of adoptees, the researchers then selected eight participants, ages seven to 13, from the adversity exposed group and another eight who’d been in the group raised by their biological parents. The children with a history of early caregiving disruptions had distinctly different gut microbiomes from those raised with biological caregivers from birth. Brain scans of all the children also showed that brain activity patterns were correlated with certain bacteria. “It is too early to say anything conclusive, but our study indicates that adversity-associated changes in the gut microbiome are related to brain function, including differences in the regions of the brain associated with emotional processing,” said Tottenham.last_img read more

Four dead in Kenyan bus blast

first_imgNAIROBI- At least four people were killed Saturday evening and 36 injured in an explosion on a minibus in Kenyan capital Nairobi.“A group of assailants threw a grenade into a bus with 32 seats,” the interior ministry said on its Twitter account.Police said the 36 injured were admitted to nearby hospitals with multiple injuries following the incident. The death toll is expected to rise due to the nature of injuries.No group has yet claimed responsibility for the attack.last_img