Local NGO success in the UK

first_imgKhulisa’s ground-breaking programmes aim to break the cycle of violence, prevent youngsters from ending up in prison, and rehabilitate those who have done time. Khulisa staff harvesting vegetables from their KwaZulu-Natal office garden to donate to a children’s shelter.(Image: Khulisa Social Solutions) MEDIA CONTACTS • Lesley Ann van Selm  MD, Khulisa Social Solutions  +27 11 788 8237 or +27 82 601 2299 RELATED ARTICLES • Khulisa reinvents lives • Mandela prison anniversary marked • Values, heritage can be learned here • Concourt art tells SA’s story • SA’s gallows now instrument of healingLucille DavieLocal NGO Khulisa’s out-of-the-box programme on restorative justice has been exported to the UK, and is now part of a package of programmes being successfully implemented by an independent registered charity.Khulisa UK’s mission is to “break the cycle of crime and violence by helping people to change their lives”. It does this in three ways: guiding by restoring empathy, self-belief and self-worth; healing individuals – both perpetrators and victims – and communities; and nurturing by believing all people can grow.“We think that we are quite unique in bringing to the UK programmes that have been tried and tested in the extremely fragile and challenging social environment of South Africa,” reads the staff induction pack. “In particular we look at projects that provide innovative and effective ways to address crime, violence, anti-social behaviour, justice and community regeneration.”Khulisa means “to nurture” in Zulu. The programme targets offenders and ex-offenders, young people at risk of exclusion, offending or becoming involved in gangs, victims or witnesses of violence and crime, as well as people facing significant personal barriers in their lives.“Through our work we aim to empower disadvantaged individuals with the skills and personal understanding they need to develop their own alternatives to violence, desist from crime, improve their futures and build stronger and safer communities.” Homegrown innovation in the UKKhulisa UK is an offshoot of South Africa’s Khulisa Social Solutions, an NGO that’s been running for 16 years. Its founder and MD Lesley Ann van Selm was originally looking to raise funding from international donors – while Khulisa has for the past 11 years been funded by the Finnish and Danish embassies, more funding was needed to expand.But the EU will only fund EU-based organisations so Van Selm set up a company in the UK called Khulisa Crime Prevention Initiative.She is an Ashoka fellow, an international body that recognises and supports leading social entrepreneurs through an entrepreneur network. “It’s quite a prestigious thing to be an Ashoka fellow,” she explains.With the support of Ashoka in the UK, she managed to get a pro bono attorney to help register the company there. A feasibility study showed that “there was as much potential for us to get money in South Africa as there was for us also to have our programmes exported to the UK”.Van Selm elaborates: “Khulisa’s programmes are so out of the box, and have been so organically developed, and we realised that the programmes in the UK were very, very conventional and all compliant against international theories of psychology, etc.”It took two years to develop a pilot programme, then Khulisa’s Silence the Violence (STV) programme was tried out in Hackney in London. A psychologist, an academic from Manchester University, a human rights activist and an ex-offender were invited to participate.“The outcomes were mind blowing,” says Van Selm. Getting the programme off the groundWith success around the corner, funding was needed to follow up on the trial programme. Khulisa managed to get several contracts with the Home Office Police, a private prison company, and several other trusts, in particular the Sainsbury’s Family Trust and the Monument Trust, which gave US$157 000 (R1.4-million). This enabled Khulisa in the UK to appoint a CEO, rent offices, employ staff and get the programme off the ground.The attitude in the UK was that if Khulisa can get the programmes to work in South Africa, with its many challenges, it can work in that country too.Now, three years down the line, the British company is a separate entity, paying royalties to Khulisa South Africa, and looking to expand their programmes there.Van Selm says that she is looking at ways to expand the restorative justice programme in the UK, through the STV programme, which is based on restoring relationships between criminal and victim.She adds that she’s proud of the fact that the UK franchise is using the Khulisa brand name. She says the name is catchy, and “makes people feel curious”.“It is a proudly South African brand.” UK operationKhulisa UK has taken the STV programme and combined it with three others – Milestones Mentoring Programme, Face It, and My Square Mile, developed in-house. These programmes supplement STV, which is described as “an intervention that additionally reduces violence and changes anti-social behaviour contributing to a reduction in violence/assaults whilst offering longer term positive effects on reducing re-offending with other supports.”It is best suited for young people in at-risk situations or those involved in gangs with exposure to crime and violence, including witnesses and victims.The programme consists of 10 modules of two- to three-hour facilitated sessions, usually run over five days. It is followed up with one-on-one support sessions. It uses group and cognitive behavioural therapy, a strengths-based approach, and includes coaching, role play, problem solving, emotional management and conflict resolution.Some of the learning outcomes include recognition of high-risk situations and techniques to avoid or cope with them; an ability to recognise levels of violence and awareness of its damaging effects; improved listening skills and greater empathy for others; the development of emotional intelligence; enhanced self-expression and self-awareness; and improved relationships. Measuring successKhulisa UK’s CEO Simon Fulford says some 1 500 people have benefited from the programmes since the organisation started operations in 2009. He adds that this excludes any indirect impact on family and community members connected to the participants.Success is not always easy to measure. “Rating success with offender rehabilitation and behaviour change programmes is always a difficult one as the impact is subtle, long-term and hard to measure or claim direct responsibility for,” he explains.Two responses give a sense of the programme’s success. An ex-offender from 2011 reports: “I’ve not cried for 18 years, and this is the first time I’ve felt safe enough to do so, in this group dynamic.”A 16-year-old school pupil said: “I was able to look into myself, pin-point what is wrong and start a path in to correct and move on, as I am able to look at others and feel empathy.”Fulford says that Khulisa UK has an annual operating budget of around $630 000 (R5.6-million), employing seven permanent staff and about a dozen freelance programme facilitators assisted by some 40 or 50 volunteers each year.The organisation operates in the London, Greater Manchester and the south coast areas of Dorset and Hampshire, but also runs programmes on an ad-hoc basis in other parts of the country, depending on contracts or commissions.“Overall, about 300 adults and children participate in our full programmes per year, with several hundred more engaged via short workshops, taster sessions, and more.”Now, Khulisa UK is looking to adapt and pilot South Africa’s Justice and Restoration Programme for use in the UK.“Khulisa UK and Khulisa South Africa bring a new dynamism to north-south relations, with a unique model of exporting social development solutions from south to north and then adapted in-country,” says Fulford.“Similarly, as we develop and enhance programmes here, we will share this knowledge and expertise with our colleagues while looking to further export the Khulisa approach.”last_img read more

If Facebook Is Smart, It’ll Do More With Voice

first_imgA Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Facebook could boost revenue by as much as $800 million per year by adding Skype-like voice service, according to a report by the Copenhagen-based research firm Strand Consult. The question is, should it?The report says Facebook’s sheer size could allow it to succeed where Google Voice and Microsoft, which acquired Skype for $8.5 billion in May 2011, have not. Facebook could, in fact be the “Skype killer,” according to the Strand report. Facebook and Skype have a partnership, announced last year, to bring video calling to Facebook.We’ve asked Facebook and Skype for their thoughts, and will update here when we hear back. Crucially, Facebook has payment-collection abilities that it uses for multiplayer games. It could use that function for billing voice-over-IP services. The report concludes that Facebook “could create a communication experience far richer than what is available today.”Jonathan Rick, who runs a Washington, D.C.-based social-media marketing firm The Jonathan Rick Group, noted that many inside North America have never used or even heard of voice over IP. That could work to Facebook’s advantage.“Facebook wouldn’t be competing against Skype and Google Voice, but introducing a brand new feature to its 1 billion users,” Rick said. “This makes for a beautiful opportunity. The risk isn’t that people won’t use VOIP; it’s that they won’t use Facebook’s VOIP. In other words, the marketplace already exists; it’s a question of whether Facebook can hack together the technology.”Stefan Rust of business-app developer Exicon Global, however, cautioned that Facebook may not have an easy time taking on Skype. Skype is primarily used for business communication, whereas Facebook remains predominantly social.“The beauty of Facebook (is that it) doesn’t require active engagement and is ambient. It’s a watercooler,” Rust said.Facebook would be “much better off opening APIs to third-party VOIP providers to tap into their community that want to use VOIP. I have a Skype account and now want to communicate with someone on Voxer, and Facebook as a central hub would allow me to do that.”The voice question comes as company observers say it needs to make a bold move to add revenue. The company’s share prices have slumped since its initial public offering in May and investors are getting restless.“In this mindset, and especially with its stock down 50 percent, Facebook doesn’t need to overtake Skype; it just needs to add another revenue stream,” Rick said.“Despite Facebook’s flock of failures — ranging from Beacon to Offers to Places — none of these has really hurt the social network’s growth or reputation. Instead, taking a crack at VOIP squares nicely with Facebook’s motto to ‘move fast and break things.’” Tags:#voice#web Related Posts Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hostingcenter_img Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… dave copeland 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

Children’s Exposure to Violence: Prevalence & Effects

first_imgBy Kacy Mixon, M.S., LMFT“As a nation, we must protect children from the traumatization that results from exposure to violence” [1]. –Attorney General Eric Holder & the National Task force on Children Exposed to ViolencePrevalence of Children Exposed to Violence:There are millions of children exposed to violence each year either as primary or secondary victims of physical abuse, sexual abuse and witnessing domestic violence or community violence.Mixon, K. (2013). Kacy Mixon gives eXtension.org permission to use her personal photo.Effects of Children’s Exposure to Violence:The effects of children’s exposure to violence are severe causing disruption of the basic cognitive, social and emotional regulation as well as brain functioning essential for optimal health, growth and wellbeing. When children’s trauma resulting from exposure to violence goes untreated, the risk for adverse symptoms and struggle increases during childhood and well into adulthood. Below are common issues associated with children’s exposure to violence. Click here for helpful resources from the Safe Start Center to help families, caregivers and professionals reverse the negative effects.Mixon, K. (2013). Kacy Mixon gives eXtension.org permission to use her personal photo.References[1] Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP). (December 2012). Report of the Attorney General’s National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence. Defending Childhood, Author. (p. 27, 85, 36)[2] Schulte, B. (July 21, 2013). Strain on military families affects young children report says. Washington Post. [3] Rentz, E.D., Martin, S.L., Gibbs, D.A., Clinton-Sherrod, M., Hardison, J., Marshall, S.W. (2006). Family violence in the military: A review of the literature. Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 7(2), 93-108.This post was written by Kacy Mixon, M.S., LMFT, Social Media Specialist.  She is a member of the MFLN Family Development (FD) team which aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network FD concentration on our website, on Facebook, on Twitter, YouTube, and on LinkedIn.last_img read more

APPLE ISLE ON TRACK FOR 2007 NATIONAL 18 YEARS CHAMPIONSHIPS

first_imgTasmania, one of Touch Football’s growth States, will be out to impress at the 18 Years National Championships in Coffs Harbour, New South Wales, from 17 – 20 September, 2007. Tasmania’s best young players have been plucked from around the State to form the Boys and Girls teams that will contest the premier event on the National junior calendar. The teams will be mentored by two of the most experienced coaches in Tasmania, John Dowling (Boys) and Deb Button (Girls). Mr. Dowling, who has coached at representative level for 12 years, and socially for more than 20, has been in charge of the Tasmanian 18 Years Boys team for the past four years.He said he was satisfied with the team that has been picked, but said the key to a successful campaign was not to be overconfident. “You’re goals have to be realistic, and we should realistically be aiming to play on the Saturday, which is finals day,” Dowling said.  In 2004, Dowling’s first year in charge, Tasmania defeated Victoria and South Australia.“That was a magnificent result for us because everyone expected us to finish at the bottom of the table,” Dowling said.Unfortunately the team couldn’t repeat the positive result, finishing near the bottom in 2005. Last year Tasmania drew with the Gold Coast and defeated the Crusaders and Northern Territory.Dowling was looking to 2007 for better results from his charges.“Our main goal is to play on finals day because in 2005 we didn’t win a game and we actually finished up on the Friday, which wasn’t pleasant.” Mr. Dowling said.The standard of Touch Football in Australia’s island state has improved markedly over the last five years.This is largely due to the introduction of a development program from under-12s to opens, as well as an increase in the amount of people qualified in technical areas of the game.The three major affiliates, the Southern, Devonport, and the Launceston Touch Associations, have provided all players in both the selected sides. Training sessions will rotate between the affiliates to offset the tyranny of distance and minimize the costs of travelling for all. Some players will have to travel as far as 300km to attend some of the sessions. The Girls’ first training camp will be this weekend 16 – 17 June, with the Boys meeting the following weekend. “I’ve got some parameters that I would like the team to achieve. I’ve got a vision for the team as to what I expect, and I’ll actually give the players, in partnership with myself and the other officials, some team goals,” Mr. Dowling said. Dowling will also be constructing individual training programs for each of his players. One of the main objectives of the team will be to gain respect. “We certainly want to finish as high as we possibly can. We’re not going to make the top four or five, that’s an unrealistic expectation, but I’d be confident that we could make the playoffs for the plate or shield finals. I want the opposition to think of us as being highly skilled and disciplined. We’ll play with a high level of intensity and meet all the challenges thrown at us and hopefully earn the respect of our opponents,” he said.  The Boys’ side will feature four players that played in the National Touch League Under-20s division in 2006. There will also be a number of experienced players that have progressed from the Under-15 ranks. One of the strike weapons for the Tasmanian Boys team will be newcomer Trent Gutteridge, who has only been playing Touch Football for about 18 months but has plenty of potential. “He’s still learning the game, but he’s exceptionally quick. We’ll be looking to develop him further through our training program,” Dowling said. The girls will be similarly strong. Last year the team aimed to finish in the top 15, and achieved its goal. This year they will be trying to improve on the result.One of the stars of the girls’ team will be 2006 TFA National 18 Years Youth Development Squad member Emily Hudson.  This year’s event will be the bubbly Hudson’s third tournament. In 2005, aged 15 and in just her first year of Touch Football, Hudson participated in her first Under-18 National Championships. She, along with current National Youth training squad member Emma Haines impressed all and sundry who attended the Inaugural National Youth Development Training Camp at Runaway Bay on the Gold Coast in 2006.The two “Tassie devils” competed well with their more experienced squad mates from NSW and Queensland, and showed great talent and determination at the Youth Camp to stamp themselves as players of the future. This year Emily is looking forward to taking on more of a leadership role. She said she was excited about the upcoming tournament. “For me the best thing will be seeing the other talent, especially in the NSW and QLD teams. You learn heaps from playing against quality players.  For the team it will definitely be about progression for the next two years because we’ve got a pretty young team this year,” Hudson said.  Hudson believed the Tasmanian side was definitely on the improve. “We’re a very quick side this year. Even though we’re a young group, we’ve all been playing for five or six years, so we know the game pretty well.” Both the boys and girls’ teams will be busy in preparation for September. When the 18 Years National Championships role around, keep an eye out for the Tasmanian teams and let’s hope they get their wish and extend their tournament into Finals day.last_img read more