Syracuse basketball opponent preview: What to know about No. 20 Duke

first_img Comments Published on January 17, 2016 at 1:55 pm Syracuse (12-7, 2-4 Atlantic Coast) rides back-to-back conference wins into Cameron Indoor Stadium on Monday night to face No. 20 Duke (14-4, 3-2), who is coming off back-to-back losses against Clemson and Notre Dame. The Blue Devils fell to the Fighting Irish 95-91 on Saturday, while the Orange romped Wake Forest by 28 behind 25 points from Trevor Cooney.Here’s what you need to know about Mike Krzyzewski’s team ahead of the matchup:All-time series: 5-3 in Duke’s favorLast time they played: Then-No. 4 Duke scraped the floor of Cameron Indoor with the Orange on Feb. 28, 2015. Justise Winslow’s season-high 23 points lead the way for the Blue Devils. Syracuse shot an abysmal 19-of-62 from the field and 3-of-20 from beyond the arc. Tyler Roberson led SU with 16 points and nine rebounds, but his frontcourt counterpart Jahlil Okafor logged a double-double with 13 points and 14 rebounds in the lopsided win.The Duke report: The Blue Devils are fourth in the country in KenPom’s adjusted offensive efficiency ranking behind Notre Dame, North Carolina and Southern Methodist. Duke hasn’t scored fewer than 80 points in any home game and only one game saw the Blue Devils put up fewer than 70. They rank second in the conference in 3-point field-goal percentage and are led by sophomore guard Grayson Allen, the ACC’s second-leading scorer with 20.2 points per game. Duke’s Achilles heel, though, may be down low with big man Amile Jefferson still sidelined due to injury. He’s factored in all four matchups with Syracuse over the past two seasons and his absence leaves the frontcourt duties to Marshall Plumlee and freshman Brandon Ingram.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textLike last year with future first-round NBA Draft picks Okafor and Tyus Jones, Duke boasts an impressive crop of freshmen. Ingram leads the group with 16.8 points and 5.9 rebounds per game, followed by sharpshooter Luke Kennard (scored 30 against Notre Dame) averaging 12.9 per game and Derryck Thornton chipping in 8.6 points and 3.1 assists per contest.How Syracuse upsets Duke: Even though Syracuse is on the rise and Duke is reeling, this would still be a sizable upset for the Orange away from home. Duke opponents score 58.1 percent of their points inside the arc and that ranks sixth in the country, according to KenPom. With Jefferson out, teams are attacking the interior and Syracuse can do the same. Tyler Roberson has been more effective finishing at the rim for the Orange and so too has Dajuan Coleman, who made all three of his field-goal attempts in the paint. If the Orange can hit a string of outside shots early like Cooney did against Wake Forest, it will open up the interior and Syracuse can attack an already thin Blue Devils frontcourt.Numbers to know: Syracuse has the lowest percentage of bench minutes in the country, according to KenPom, but Duke isn’t much deeper. The Blue Devils bench players see only 26 percent of a game’s minutes on average, which ranks 321st in the nation. If Syracuse can wear down Duke in transition (it’s unlikely because the Blue Devils have the seventh-best turnover percentage in the country), Krzyzewski may be forced to dip further into a team that is already without one of its best players.Player to watch: Kennard may not be as prominent os Allen or Ingram, but the freshman’s season-high 30 points against the Fighting Irish puts him well on Syracuse’s radar. He’s scored in double figures in each of Duke’s five ACC games and has only had one game shooting below 50 percent from the field in conference play. Kennard can also get to the rim and draw contact, which SU may not want to incite since Kennard shoots a whopping 92.4 percent from the foul line, which ranks sixth in the country. Here’s a jab step he used against Notre Dame.center_img Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Alexander: Yasiel Puig remains a fan favorite, but Dodgers don’t miss him

first_img Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco Nice. Roberts tried to talk him into the concept that games and pennants and World Series are won in the moment, and not necessarily in a contract year, but here we are.So Puig, who signed a seven-year, $42 million deal with the Dodgers in 2012 after escaping from Cuba, is lining up his next payday. He will be 29 this December, closing in on the age at which free agents recently have been lucky to get one-year major league deals, and it might take the type of walk year Adrián Beltré had for the Dodgers in 2004 (48 homers, 121 RBIs, 1.017 OPS) to convince someone to risk big dollars.Maybe Monday’s first at-bat was an early sample. Moments after waving feebly at a curve in his first at-bat against Clayton Kershaw, Puig scalded an 87 mph slider (with, admittedly, not much slide) to dead center for a two-run homer, his second of the season.Are there ill feelings between Puig and his former team? Don’t listen to the words. Watch the actions.A Dodgers delegation including Roberts, club president Stan Kasten, baseball ops boss Andrew Friedman and managing partner Mark Walter trooped over to the visitors’ side Monday afternoon to present the Reds’ former Dodgers with their 2018 National League championship rings. Matt Kemp, Kyle Farmer and Alex Wood, who has been injured but joined the club in L.A., accepted them, and according to Roberts, the group had a nice chat.Former hitting coach Turner Ward “was in the cage,” working with hitters, Roberts said. “And Yasiel didn’t make it, so we’ll give them their rings at some other point.”Related Articles PreviousThe Reds’ Yasiel Puig #42 celebrates after hitting a two run homer in the first inning during their game against the Dodgers during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig, right, watches the flight of his solo home run as Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw, left, also turns to watch during the first inning of Monday’s game at Dodger Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig speaks to reporters prior to Monday’s game against the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium. Puig, in a surprise to few, was an hour later to the session. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill) SoundThe gallery will resume insecondsThe Reds’ Yasiel Puig #66 during batting practice during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Matt Kemp #7 during batting practice during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig #66 during batting practice during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig #66 during batting practice during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig enjoys a light moment during batting practice before Monday’s game against the Dodgers at Dodger Stadium. It was Puig’s first regular-season game against his former team since being traded in the offseason. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 15: Former Los Angeles Dodger Yasiel Puig #66, now of the Cincinnati Reds, steps out of the dugout during batting practice before the game on Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium on April 15, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 15: Former Los Angeles Dodger Yasiel Puig #66, now of the Cincinnati Reds, stretches during batting practice, before the game on Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium on April 15, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Cincinnati Reds’ Yasiel Puig warms up prior to a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Cincinnati Reds’ Yasiel Puig catches a football thrown by Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Kenley Jansen as he speaks to reporters prior to a baseball game between the Dodgers and the Reds, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 15: Former Los Angeles Dodgers Yasiel Puig, now of the Cincinnati Reds, reacts to his catch from a football thrown by former teammate Kenley Jansen #74, during a press conference before the game on Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium on April 15, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)Cincinnati Reds’ Yasiel Puig, right, is greeted by Los Angeles Dodgers relief pitcher Kenley Jansen as Puig speaks to reporters prior to a baseball game between the Dodgers and the Reds, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Cincinnati Reds’ Yasiel Puig tips his helmet to fans as he comes up to bat during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Cincinnati Reds’ Yasiel Puig hits a solo home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Cincinnati Reds’ Yasiel Puig, right, hits a solo home run as Los Angeles Dodgers catcher Austin Barnes, left, watches along with home plate umpire Angel Hernandez during the first inning of a baseball game Monday, April 15, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 15: Yasiel Puig #42 of the Cincinnati Reds takes a swing in his first at bat in his return to his former team during the first inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers on Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium on April 15, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. All players are wearing the number 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson Day. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 15: Yasiel Puig #42 of the Cincinnati Reds takes a swing in his first at bat in his return to his former team during the first inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers on Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium on April 15, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. All players are wearing the number 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson Day. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig #42 hits a two run homer in the first inning during their game against the Dodgers during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)Cincinnati Reds’ Yasiel Puig flips his bat after hitting a solo home run during the first inning of a baseball game against the Los Angeles Dodgers, Monday, April 15, 2019, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)Dodger starring pitcher Clayton Kershaw #42 looks away as the Reds’ Yasiel Puig #42 rounds the bases after hitting a two run homer in the first inning during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA – APRIL 15: Yasiel Puig #42 of the Cincinnati Reds celebrates his two run homerun to take a 2-0 lead during the first inning against the Los Angeles Dodgers on Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium on April 15, 2019 in Los Angeles, California. All players are wearing the number 42 in honor of Jackie Robinson Day. (Photo by Harry How/Getty Images)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig #42 celebrates after hitting a two run homer in the first inning during their game against the Dodgers during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig #42 celebrates after hitting a two run homer in the first inning during their game against the Dodgers during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig #42 celebrates after hitting a two run homer in the first inning during their game against the Dodgers during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig #42 celebrates after hitting a two run homer in the first inning during their game against the Dodgers during Jackie Robinson Day at Dodger Stadium Monday April 15, 2019. (Photo by Hans Gutknecht, Los Angeles Daily News/SCNG)The Reds’ Yasiel Puig, right, watches the flight of his solo home run as Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw, left, also turns to watch during the first inning of Monday’s game at Dodger Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)NextShow Caption1 of 26The Reds’ Yasiel Puig, right, watches the flight of his solo home run as Dodgers starting pitcher Clayton Kershaw, left, also turns to watch during the first inning of Monday’s game at Dodger Stadium. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)ExpandLOS ANGELES — The news conference, Yasiel Puig’s first act in Los Angeles as a member of the Cincinnati Reds, was supposed to begin at 3 p.m.By 3:40, Reds publicist Rob Butcher walked into the room and uttered what were probably the least surprising words to be heard in Dodger Stadium over the last six years: “Yasiel’s late.”Not in the room. Not in the ballpark. And not a new story for players and coaches on the home side, who had dealt with Puig’s often casual approach to accountability since his arrival in the major leagues in 2013.So tell us again, Puig fans, exactly what we are, um, missing since the trade last December that sent Puig and three other Dodgers to Cincinnati for, essentially, California League shortstop Jeter Downs and Midwest League right-handed pitcher Josiah Gray. Puig’s take, when he finally made it to the press conference room more than an hour after his scheduled time:“He told me (that the rings would be presented). He can send the ring to my locker or give it to me in batting practice. I don’t care.”Maybe the sting of his rejection, coupled with the prospect of free agency, will lead to a monster year for Puig after six seasons of occasional greatness mixed with frustration.Whatever. When all is said and done, the Dodgers – with fewer distractions and less likelihood of repeated fundamental screwups – will be a better, more efficient team without Puig than they were with him.Many Dodger fans miss him now, as indicated by the noise level when Puig came to the plate. The view here is that they’ll have forgotten him by October.jalexander@scng.com@Jim_Alexander on Twittercenter_img Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Yes, Puig was exciting and talented. Also mercurial, emotional, a risk taker who relied on his instincts and was just as apt to airmail a throw from the outfield and allow a runner to take an extra base as he was to gun down a runner from the right field corner.Licking the bat, wagging his tongue, kissing the hitting coach on the forehead, getting in a dustup with an opponent who didn’t appreciate his unique style … those were all part of the package. They excited and delighted the fans, while more than occasionally exasperating the men alongside whom Puig played.Late? Wasn’t the first time, won’t be the last time, and it couldn’t be nearly as egregious as the time he showed up late for the 2014 home opener, thinking it was a night game, and was benched.Don Mattingly, Puig’s first manager, got to where he rolled his eyes. Dave Roberts tried to be the patient dad – remember when he “grounded” Puig for lack of attention on the basepaths – but at some point patience wears thin, doesn’t it? New Reds manager David Bell will soon understand if he doesn’t already.Unless … unless the lure of free agency energizes Puig into a banner season. He suggested as much in a spring training interview, telling Cincinnati writers: “The last couple years I didn’t work hard because I still have a contract to go. Now I think I’ll work hard more than any year in my life.” Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more

Iowa’s governor not yet setting target date for ending COVID restrictions

first_imgJOHNSTON — President Trump says he’d like the country to get back to normal by Easter. Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds today said she is not prepared to name a target date.“The decisions are so fluid,” Reynolds said Tuesday during her daily news conference. “What I say sometimes at a press conference after we receive new data, I have to stand in front of Iowans the next day and I’ve made a different decision.”The governor indicated the criteria she used to order the closure of businesses like bars, restaurants and hair salons will be the same criteria she uses to lift those restrictions.“I want to get business back to normal as quickly as I can, too,” Reynolds said. “I think we have that shared goal. I just want to make sure that I’m protecting Iowans and I’m making decisions on the right data points.”Even if things return to normal in the late spring and summer, Reynolds warned there may be another surge in COVID cases later in the fall and next winter.“Chances are even though we flatten the curve and we work out of it and we bring industry back on, there’s the potential until we get a vaccine that it’s going to tick back up at some point,” Reynolds said, “so we have to take that into consideration.”There was a 60% increase in the number of Iowans hospitalized for treatment of COVID-19 from Sunday night to Monday night, although Reynolds said Iowa’s tally of 18 hospitalized patients is still low when compared to other states.“We want to get things back to normal as quickly as we can and that’s why we’ve taken the various steps that we’ve taken,” Reynolds said, “because all along, by implementing the policies and procedures that we’ve put in place, we’ve done that as a means to ‘bend the curve’ and hopefully prevent overwhelming our hospitals and our public health workers.”Some mayors in Johnson County have called on the governor to issue a “shelter in place” order, but Reynolds said the criteria established by the Iowa Department of Public Health does not suggest that step is necessary at this time. The department is tracking infection rates and whether there are outbreaks among vulnerable groups — like residents in a nursing home.last_img read more