San Diego Police increasing traffic safety enforcement

first_img Updated: 6:48 PM , SAN DIEGO (KUSI) — The San Diego Police Department is conducting an increased traffic safety enforcement operation Saturday.Officers were on the lookout for “collision causing factors” throughout the city from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.“Routine traffic patrols will focus efforts in trouble spots while special targeted patrols will also be deployed to crack down on drivers and pedestrians who violate traffic laws meant to protect all roadway users,” SDPD Officer Mark McCullough said. “Officers will be looking for traffic offenses made by drivers, bicyclists and pedestrians alike that can lead to life changing injuries.”McCullough said attention will be directed toward drivers speeding, making illegal turns, failing to stop for signs and signals and failing to yield to pedestrians in crosswalks.Police also are looking for pedestrians who cross illegally or fail to yield to drivers who have the right-of-way.Funding for the program was provided by a grant from the California Office of Traffic Safety through the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, McCullough said. January 20, 2018 Posted: January 20, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter San Diego Police increasing traffic safety enforcementlast_img read more

Sonic Temple 2019 Lineup With System Of A Down Lamb Of God

first_img Facebook System Of A Down Reunite For Sonic Temple 2019 sonic-temple-2019-lineup-system-down-lamb-god-more Email https://twitter.com/SonicTempleFest/status/1067059068550828032 Twitter Sonic Temple 2019 Lineup With System Of A Down, Lamb Of God, More News Ohio hosts 2019’s inaugural hard-rock festival experience — its stacked lineup reveals a debut with a pedigreePhilip MerrillGRAMMYs Nov 26, 2018 – 1:51 pm Danny Wimmer Presents has announced the lineup for the Sonic Temple Art & Music Festival to be held in Columbus, Ohio on May 17–19, 2019, including the reunited System Of A Down, plus other GRAMMY winners  Foo Fighters, Ghost, Halestorm, and Tom Morello.While replacing the successful 12-year run of Rock On The Range, Sonic Temple aims to be more than just a festival with expanded art, comedy and food experiences.”Although in its inaugural year, Sonic Temple’s pedigree is proven, and its roots are strong,” said System Of A Down’s Shavo Odadjian. “It made total sense for us to be involved.”That pedigree has also drawn GRAMMY nominees Disturbed, Gojira, Joan Jett And The Blackhearts, Killswitch Engage, Lamb Of God, Mark Lanegan Band, Meshuggah, and The Prodigy. The exciting array of rockers also includes Action Bronson, Beartooth, The Black Dahlia Murder, Bring Me The Horizon, Chevelle, The Cult, Pussy Riot, Yungblud, and many more.The fest’s SiriusXM Comedy & Spoken Word Tent will host, among others, GRAMMY winner Henry Rollins, GRAMMY nominee Andrew Dice Clay and Pauly Shore.Tickets for the inaugural experience go on sale at the Sonic Temple Festival website on Nov. 30 at noon, eastern time.Black Dahlia Murder: For The Love Of Melodic MetalRead morelast_img read more

Heres Whats In The HouseApproved Health Care Bill

first_img Share Pablo Martinez Monsivais/APThe House is voting on the Republican health care bill on Thursday.Republicans approved their plan to replace the Affordable Care Act on Thursday.Here’s a rundown of key provisions in the American Health Care Act and what would happen if the Senate approves them and the bill becomes law.Buying InsuranceThe bill would no longer require people to buy insurance through the marketplaces created by the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare, if they want to use federal tax credits to buy coverage. It also would eliminate the tax penalty for failing to have health insurance coverage, effectively eliminating that requirement altogether.In place of that mandate, the bill encourages people to maintain coverage by prohibiting insurance companies from cutting them off or charging more for pre-existing conditions for as long as their insurance doesn’t lapse. If coverage is interrupted for more than 63 days, however, insurers can charge people a 30 percent penalty over their premium for one year.Tax CreditsThe House Republican plan would eliminate the income-based tax credits and subsidies available under the Affordable Care Act, replacing them with age-based tax credits ranging from $2,000 a year for people in their 20s to $4,000 a year for those older than 60.That means some people will see their costs go up while others would pay less, depending on your age and where you live. This Kaiser Family Foundation interactive map shows how the change would play out across the country.The map shows that a 27-year-old who makes $30,000 a year would see their costs rise about $2,000 in Nebraska, but fall by about the same amount in Washington. A 60-year-old however, would see costs rise almost everywhere, with increases of almost $20,000 a year in Nebraska.Both Kaiser and the Congressional Budget Office found that on average, older people with lower incomes would be worse off under the Republican plan than under the Affordable Care Act.Tax CutsThe bill eliminates nearly all the taxes that were included in the Affordable Care act to pay for the subsidies that help people buy insurance. Those cuts, which add up to about $592 billion, include a tax on incomes over $200,000 (or $250,000 for a married couple); a tax on health insurers and a limit on how much insurance companies can deduct for executive pay; and a tax on medical-device manufacturers.MedicaidThe AHCA would make dramatic changes to the Medicaid program, which is the federal –state health program for the poor and disabled.The Affordable Care Act allows states to expand eligibility for Medicaid to single, non-disabled adults with incomes slightly above the poverty line, with the federal government picking up most of the cost. That meant single adults who earn up to $15,800 a year could qualify in the 31 states, plus the District of Columbia, that expanded Medicaid. About 10 million people enrolled under that expansion.The Republican plan would gradually roll back that expansion starting in 2019 by cutting the federal reimbursement to states for anyone who leaves the Medicaid rolls. People often cycle in and out of the program as their income fluctuates, so the result would likely be ever-dwindling numbers covered.The House bill also converts Medicaid from an entitlement program where the government pays all the health-related costs for those who qualify, into a grant program. The federal government would give states either a set amount of money for each Medicaid enrollee, or states can choose to receive a fixed-dollar block grant.The Congressional Budget Office estimated in March that the bill would cut Medicaid spending by $880 billion.Pre-Existing ConditionsThe AHCA maintains protections for people with pre-existing conditions, with some important exceptions (see waivers, below). That means that someone with high medical expenses pays the same premium for the same policy as anyone else their age in their area.State WaiversThis section of the bill essentially amounts to an optional, state-level full repeal of Obamacare. It would give states the ability to apply for a waiver that lets them opt out of most of the regulations and consumer protections that were included in the Affordable Care Act.States could apply for waivers that allow insurance companies in their states to do three things: 1) Charge older people more than five times what they charge young people for the same policy; 2) Eliminate required coverage, called essential health benefits including maternity care, mental health and prescription drugs, required under the Affordable Care Act; and 3) Charge more or deny coverage to people who have pre-existing health conditions, such as cancer, diabetes or arthritis.The waivers could also impact people with-employer based insurance, because they would allow insurers to offer policies that have annual and lifetime benefit limits, which are banned under the Affordable Care Act, and some companies may choose those policies for their workers to lower their premiums.States that get waivers would likely see insurance companies offer many more policy options, some with fewer benefits and lower premiums.Those states would be required under the law to create some other way to ensure that people with expensive illnesses are able to get health care, and the law provides up to $138 billion over 10 years for such programs, typically called high-risk pools.However, an analysis released Thursday by the consulting form Avalere concludes that that amount would be inadequate to provide full health coverage for the number of people who now buy insurance in the individual market and have medical problems.Overall ImpactThe House approved the bill Thursday without a full analysis by the Congressional Budget Office of its costs and how many people would be covered.The CBO report from March concluded that over 10 years, 24 million fewer people would be covered under the bill who otherwise would have had insurance under current law.That analysis also predicted that the House bill would cut the federal deficit by $337 billion over those same 10 years.However, changes to the bill since then would allow states to accept block grants for Medicaid; add about $38 billion for high-risk pools and maternity and childbirth care; and offer states waivers from regulations created by the Affordable Care Act. It’s unclear how much these changes would affect the original CBO score.last_img read more

Robot uses supersonic air jets to climb on walls and ceilings w

first_img Citation: Robot uses supersonic air jets to climb on walls and ceilings (w/ video) (2011, May 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-05-robot-supersonic-air-jets-climb.html (PhysOrg.com) — Instead of using sticky footpads to climb on walls and ceilings, a new robot takes advantage of fast-moving air that can generate an adhesion force on just about any kind of surface. The robot’s grippers, which don’t ever actually touch the surface as the robot climbs, operate on Bernoulli’s principle of fluid dynamics. Da Vinci surgical robot makes a tiny paper airplane More information: IEEE Spectrum The robot was developed by researchers at the University of Canterbury in New Zealand, with the results published in a recent ICRA paper by Matthew Journee, et al. According to Bernoulli’s principle, when a fluid (such as air) moves faster, its pressure decreases. To generate extremely fast-moving air, the researchers designed round grippers with tiny 25-μm gaps around the rim, out of which high-speed air can be forced. This design can compress the airflow so much that the air reaches supersonic speeds of Mach 3. The fast-moving air creates a low-pressure vortex inside the grippers that’s strong enough to pull the robot toward nearby surfaces, such as walls and ceilings, without actually touching them. The robot can roll on its two wheels, but the grippers are separated from the surface by a small gap. Explore furthercenter_img The robot demonstrates adhesion with supersonic air jets on a variety of surfaces. Video credit: University of Canterbury. Non-contact Bernoulli grippers have previously been used to pick up lightweight objects, especially those that are sterile or fragile. But in order to use the principle to enable a robot to climb, the researchers had to make the grippers five times stronger than the conventional version. They achieved this increase in strength by the carefully designed gaps, without the need for additional air pressure.The non-contact grippers could have applications in industrial inspections, and should be available in the coming months. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. In this clip from the video below, the robot crawls up a wall using a non-contact vacuum grip, due to Bernoulli’s principle. Image credit: University of Canterbury. © 2010 PhysOrg.comlast_img read more

HarleyDavidsons First Electric Motorcycle Arrives in August for 30K

first_img This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. After years of talk, Harley-Davidson is finally ready to put its LiveWire electric motorcycle up for sale — and not surprisingly, it’ll cost you. The green two-wheeler is now available for pre-order ahead of its August debut for a hefty $29,799. That’s a lot to shell out, but Harley is betting that performance and connectivity will seal the deal.The motor tucked between your legs can take the LiveWire to 60MPH in a brisk 3.5 seconds (complete with a “futuristic” sound), while an H-D Connect service uses LTE to help you remotely check on the status of your bike, get service reminders and find out whether someone is trying to mess with your ride. If someone manages to steal the motorcycle, you can track its whereabouts through GPS.There’s one main catch if the LiveWire is within your budget: the range. Harley estimates that you’ll get 110 miles of urban riding on a charge. That’s certainly enough for many commutes, but a veteran like Zero Motorcycles has bikes that can handle up to 163 miles in the city in their standard form. You’re paying for the LiveWire’s power, technology and its all-business looks.  2 min read January 8, 2019 This story originally appeared on Engadget Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more