No. 1 SFA Defeats No. 8 Texas A&M-Corpus Christi in Four Sets

first_imgThe victory extends the Ladyjack’s winning streak to 27 matches, continuing the longest active streak in NCAA Division I volleyball. SFA prevailed after falling behind 4-1 in the opening three sets. Danae Daron registered a team-high 15 kills on 31 attacks for a .452 hitting percentage. NATCHITOCHES, La. – No. 1 seed Stephen F. Austin marched to a 3-1 victory over No. 8 seed Texas A&M-Corpus Christi in game one of the 2018 Southland Conference Tournament at Prather Coliseum in Natchitoches, La. Each squad boasted a player with a triple-double performance as SFA’s Ann Hollas (10 kills, 10 digs, 20 assists) and Texas A&M-Corpus Christi’s Madison Green (10 kills, 14 digs and 44 assists) accomplished the feat. Box Score | Photo Gallery | 2018 Southland Conference Volleyball Tournament Homepage The Islander’s Julia Carter tabbed a match-high 20 kills on 33 attacks for a .606 hitting percentage. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi was unable to overcome Stephen F. Austin’s presence at the net as SFA held a 10-2 block advantage over the Islanders. Set OneTexas A&M-Corpus Christi jumped to an early 5-1 lead over the Ladyjacks to open up the match. Stephen F. Austin stormed back with a 9-2 run in order to take an 11-8 advantage. SFA extended their lead to 17-14 following a kill from Hollas that forced an Islanders timeout. After returning to action, Stephen F. Austin proved to be too much and eventually closed the opening set 25-21 following an Islander ball handling error. Set TwoThe Islanders began set two with another 5-1 run that once again stunned the Ladyjack squad. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi continued their efforts and managed keep the SFA offense at bay until the middle of the set when Anyia Williams blasted a kill for Stephen F. Austin that leveled the score at 14-14. On the next possession, SFA’s Coleman set a ball for Mckenzie Brewer who placed a shot between Islander defenders that gave Stephen F. Austin their first lead of the set at 15-14. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi held strong and regained their advantage at 23-22 following a kill from Julia Carter. A timeout then led to consecutive points from the Islanders who went ahead 25-24. Texas A&M-Corpus Christi continued their success and closed the set on top with a 29-27 victory following six kills from Carter. Set FourStephen F. Austin learned from the first three sets and wasted no time racing to a 12-4 advantage at the beginning of game four. Danae Daron’s fifth block of the afternoon proved to be the exclamation mark for the Ladyjacks who cruised to a 25-14 fourth set victory. Set ThreeOnce again, Texas A&M-Corpus Christi found an early rhythm and streaked out to a 4-1 advantage. Stephen F. Austin retaliated with a 6-2 scoring run that placed the Ladyjacks ahead 7-6 early on in the set. The teams proceeded to trade leads until an Islander attack error pushed SFA ahead 15-14. SFA’s Hollas then tallied her ninth kill of the match that placed the Ladyjacks on top 18-14. Though the Islanders managed to tie the game at 23-23, Coleman dealt an ace for Stephen F. Austin that finished the set at 25-23. Stephen F. Austin awaits the winner of No. 4 Abilene Christian vs. No. 5 Houston Baptist in the first semifinal Saturday at 12 a.m. on the Southland Digital Network.last_img read more

ScienceShot: What’s the Deepest a Fish Can Swim?

first_imgOcean-going fish can’t live any deeper than 8200 meters, according to a new study. All fish have their limits—you’ll never find sharks below 4 kilometers, for example—but why there aren’t any fish at all below 8 kilometers remains a mystery. Now, a team of biologists say the threshold is set by two competing effects of trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO), a chemical in fish cells that prevents proteins from collapsing under high pressure. While fish should need more and more TMAO to survive ever greater depths, higher concentrations of the compound also draw in more and more seawater through osmosis, the process by which cells regulate their water content. In the deepest waters, high TMAO levels reverse osmosis pressure, swelling brain cells to the point that they stop working and, in principle, bursting red blood cells open. (The team says they’re still working on how other marine creatures like anemones and bacteria avoid such gruesome fates at the most extreme depths, but they suspect those organisms produce more efficient protein boosters than fish can.) To test that claim, the team looked 7000 meters down in the Kermadec Trench north of New Zealand. There, they captured five Notoliparis kermadecensis snailfish (pictured above alongside a brittle star, Ophiura loveni), whose record TMAO levels and osmosis pressures matched projections the researchers made based on shallower dwelling fish. Extrapolating the new results just a bit further, they find osmosis should reverse itself at a depth of 8200 meters—right about where fish no longer swim the sea.See more ScienceShots.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)last_img read more