USDA, FAO to launch animal disease crisis center

first_img The facility will be run by the FAO in close collaboration with the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), according to a joint press release from the USDA and FAO. Specialists at the center will provide disease analysis and information and will dispatch resources to prevent and manage dangerous animal diseases. Experts there will also collaborate with the World Health Organization. See also: The United States will provide $1.8 million, and the USDA is sending four veterinarians to help launch the new center, officials said. France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom will also contribute to the center. The announcement gave no details on the center’s staff size or budget. “All nations will benefit as we work to reduce the risk and spread of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza,” said USDA Secretary Mike Johanns. “The international community has a responsibility to equip countries, especially developing countries, with the expertise and resources necessary for a rapid and effective response to any possible animal disease outbreak.” Samuel Jutzi, head of the FAO’s Animal Production and Health Division, said the crisis center will boost the effectiveness of the FAO’s current operations related to avian flu, which is especially important now that the H5N1 virus is present in at least 32 countries. Jul 14, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) announced today that a new animal disease crisis management center will begin operating in late July at FAO headquarters in Rome, with an initial focus on H5N1 avian influenza. Jul 14 USDA news releaselast_img read more

Marburg fever case reported in Netherlands

first_imgJul 10, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – European officials today reported a rare case of the often-deadly Marburg hemorrhagic fever on European soil, in a Dutch woman who recently was exposed to bats while visiting caves in Uganda.Dutch authorities informed the European Union and the World Health Organization of the case today, according to a statement from the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). The patient is a 40-year-old woman who had recently returned from a vacation in Uganda.”The travel included a visit to two caves in the Maramagambo forest (between Queen Elizabeth Park and Kebale), where she was exposed to fruit bats,” the ECDC said. The patient was at Leiden University Medical Centre; her condition was not disclosed.”ECDC’s initial assessment is that the threat to public health is limited and mainly focused on the people who have been in close contact with the patient after the onset of her symptoms,” the agency said. “People intending to travel to Uganda should be aware there may be a risk related to visiting caves in the Maramagambo forest.”The Marburg virus, like its cousin the Ebola virus, can cause a severe febrile disease for which there is no vaccine or specific treatment. The case-fatality rate ranges from 30% to 90%, depending on the strain, according to an ECDC fact sheet. The most recent large Marburg outbreak occurred in Angola in 2004 and 2005, involving 252 confirmed cases with 227 deaths.Marburg and Ebola can spread through contact with blood, secretions, or other body fluids of living or dead infected persons, and also through contact with living or dead infected animals, according to the ECDC.The natural reservoir for Marburg virus is unknown, but last year researchers reported finding genetic material from the virus in a species of fruit bat in Gabon. The bats might have been a reservoir for the virus, or they might have acquired it from some other animal, the researchers said.See also: Aug 22, 2007, CIDRAP News story “Traces of Marburg virus found in African bats”CIDRAP overview of viral hemorrhagic fevershttp://www.cidrap.umn.edu/cidrap/content/bt/vhf/biofacts/index.htmllast_img read more

Incomplete journey

first_imgAs I sat marooned by almost as much snow that fell upon Pittsburgh during the blizzard of ‘93, I was certainly not “grooving last Saturday afternoon.” I have come to the realization that in spite of the fact that Barack Obama and first lady Michelle currently occupy the big house, oops I meant White House, my vision is still a tad blurry as I began to calculate the gains that African-Americans have made over the past five decades. The present and the future became clearer and though it may not be what I want it to be, nonetheless, it is what it is. I instantly became humbled and I consider it as one of my many blessings to be a part of the sports writing and reporting lineage of the New Pittsburgh Courier, especially during this, our centennial year. I think about Bill Nunn, the legendary journalist and NFL scout who entered the newspaper business as a sports writer for the Pittsburgh Courier and later rose to sports editor and finally our managing editor. He took the Courier’s Black College All-American team to another level before he joined the Pittsburgh Steelers’ scouting staff part time in 1967 and then full time in 1969. He became a liaison between the Steelers and historically Black Colleges and universities.  After earning five Super Bowl Rings, Bill Nunn is among the most legendary NFL scouts of all time but he still makes time for me. Whenever I telephone him and he says, “son what are you up to,” it never gets old. Chills still run up and down my spine.I also reflected on the late Myron Cope, who wrote a column for the Courier. Myron introduced me to Charles Henry (Chuck) Noll, the Emperor.However, during that blizzard-like day I also reminisced about the Dec. 20 Steelers/Packers game at Heinz Field where I had an unofficial head count of about 14 faces of color (excluding scouts) that graced press row. Overall, there were no more than twenty Blacks seated in a press box that has the capacity to hold in excess of 150 bodies. That memory was not as pleasant.Initially, I thought I might have been hallucinating but the 2006 racial and gender report card of the Associated Press Sports Editors, compiled by the University of South Florida, has an even bleaker statistical view of the situation than my personal experiences can convey. The report states that, White men and women comprised 88 percent of the total staffs of all APSE member newspapers; African-Americans held 6.2 percent, Latinos 3.6 percent, Asians 1.3 percent, and “other” people of color less than 1 percent.Women made up 12.6 percent of total staffs of APSE member newspapers. 94.7 percent of APSE sports editors were White while 90.0 percent were white males; African-Americans held only 1.6 percent; Latinos 2.8 percent and “others” less than 1 percent. There were no Asian sports editors. Whites held 86.9 percent of the assistant sports editor posts in the survey, while people of color made up 13.1 percent. African-Americans were 5.3 percent, Latinos 5.5 percent, Asians 1.6 percent, and other people of color 0.8 percent. Talk about an “ole boys club.” Maybe the Associated Press should be renamed the APP, (All Pals Press) not to be confused with AWB, (Average White Band).The racial makeup of the NFL is more than 75 percent African-American and the Black athletes in the NBA exceed 80 percent. Even when we figure in the coverage of the predominately White NHL and the numbers of Latinos’ and Whites who comprise the majority in MLB, there still remains an unacceptable racial gap when it comes to sports reporting in America.Charles Hallman of the Minnesota Spokesman-Recorder quotes Bill Rhoden, the New York Times sports columnist as saying, “Until a year ago [2008] I was the only African-American on the sports staff at the New York Times. What you see on press row in 2009 is not too much different than what you saw on press row in 1963.” Dr. Harry Edwards, University of California-Berkeley professor emeritus says that the media row at sporting events such as the NCAA Championships “is still the most segregated area in sports.”The most common excuse that I get when credentials are denied to me is, “sorry you don’t write for a daily.” Well there doesn’t seem to be much room for me, especially when White men and women hold 88 percent of the total slots of all APSE member newspapers. Now I am not a hater when it comes to my European colleagues being employed, but talk about reverse affirmative action gone wild. Whew, you be the judge. After running around the block I have returned to my nice warm dining room, still stranded, not by all of the snow that has fallen, but slowed by “the albatross of reality” that is giving me neck pain just because of having to endure the daily “snow jobs” that I and the majority of African-American sports writers are forced to face when applying for credentials to any sporting event.(Aubrey Bruce can be reached at: abruce@newpittsburghcourier.com.)last_img read more

Healthy Living by Tumwater Chiropractic Center- Laser Therapy for Tennis Elbow

first_imgSubmitted by Kelly Golob for Tumwater Chiropractic Center“Tennis Elbow”, or more technically, Lateral Epicondylitis, is inflammation and damage of the tendons in your arm that you are using right now to scroll down this page with your mouse, or navigate the web on your touchscreen.This injury is commonly seen in racquet-sport athletes, but is also common in “office athletes”, people who spend a lot of time using smart phones, or others who overuse those small muscles their arms some other way.  Initially this injury starts out as inflammation of a normal tendon, but over time this can become a chronic injury that actually changes the structure of the tendons involved (tendinosis).Some established techniques to treat chronic tennis elbow include eccentric exercises and soft-tissue mobilization.  But more recently many people are beginning to see good results using Low-Level Laser therapy to treat chronic tennis elbow.A new study was recently published in the journal Lasers in Surgery and Medicine (one of the coolest journal names out there) looking at treatment of tennis elbow with low-level Laser therapy.  In this study they treated 16 patients with the real Laser or a fake laser for 8 sessions over the course of three weeks.  At the beginning of the study all patients had severe pain and significant weakness in their elbows.  These patients were then re-evaluated after the initial treatment, and again 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months after the treatments ended.The results of this study found no significant differences between the two groups at the end of the treatments. However, at the 3, 6 and 12 month follow ups the group treated with the real Lasers had significant improvements in their pain and strength, while the group treated with the fake laser had no significant improvements even a year later!Therefore the authors of this study concluded that Laser therapy is an effective treatment for chronic tennis elbow (lateral epicondylitis).Our office is one of a few clinics in town offering Laser therapy, and in combination with other treatments we provide (i.e. adjustments, massage, traction, exercise) we see greater results than with treatment from any one of those alone.We have found Laser therapy to be particularly helpful in speeding up the recovery process for chronic injuries or slow healing injuries, such as fractures, cartilage injuries, chronic tendinitis, and many others.So if you have chronic pain, or want to speed up your recovery, call our office today to set up an exam to see if Laser treatment might be right for you.Kelly Golob, D.C. is a chiropractor at Tumwater Chiropractic Center at 128 D St SW in Tumwater.  Their clinic offers a variety of conservative and alternative treatments for musculoskeletal injuries and preventative wellness.  They can be contacted at 360-570-9580 or online or find them on Facebook. Facebook3Tweet0Pin0last_img read more