Ohio Ag Weather and Forecast November 4, 2019

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest We start off the week with some nicer weather. Partly to mostly sunny skies are expected today. Tomorrow we have to leave the door open for some hit and miss moisture south of a line from Cleveland to Dayton. However, the moisture is not impressive or well organized, so only a few hundredths to .25″ are truly possible with coverage at no better than 50%. The rest of the day and the rest of the state will feature a mix of clouds and sun. We are dry and at least partly sunny again on Wednesday.Thursday we have a minor disturbance trying to come up from the south. This will bring moisture potential to areas from I-70 southward at a minimum, and we may see it expand farther north through Thursday afternoon. Rain totals can be from ..05″-.4″ with coverage at 80%. The track and northern extent of this system is still up in the air at this time, so this will be something we watch closely over the next day or two.A major push of cold air is on the way behind that system for late in the week. Clouds mix with sun for Friday, and we turn out partly to mostly sunny Saturday and Sunday. Lake effect snows are possible on Friday in NE Ohio, clouds increase Sunday afternoon.Another cold push, this time with moisture attached, comes for Sunday overnight through Monday. This will trigger snow statewide, and the next leg down in a brutal cold push. We expect snow accumulation in most of the state, from a coating to 2 inches. Then we get very cold for Tuesday and Wednesday as skies clear out, except for some lake effect snow along the south shore of Lake Erie.Generally, there are some windows of opportunity for harvest in the next 10 days, as we see mostly minor moisture. The map at right shows 10 day liquid equivalent cumulative moisture. However, the cold air will be advancing fast over the region from late this week through next.last_img read more

Microsoft Completes Journey To Big Data Through Hadoop

first_imgThere’s no beating around this bush. Today Hortonworks announced a new beta version of its Hadoop Data Platform that will run on Microsoft Windows Server, a move that shows Microsoft’s own Big Data efforts will forever be connected to open source innovation. This is a highly significant – even expected – move in the big data sector, but also a very strange one.Hadoop, of course, is an open-source software architecture that supports distributed computation jobs on huge data sets – in other words, classic Big Data work. Hortonworks, meanwhile, is one of the bigger Hadoop vendors in the market, even if that’s more in terms of innovation than sales, where it trails Cloudera. Hortonworks founder and architect Arun Murthy is one of the original Hadoop coders who came out of Yahoo back in the day, and he also serves as the VP of the open source Apache Hadoop project at the Apache Software Foundation.Which all means that any major platform move like this is sure to impact the rest of Hadoop development and, by extension, the rapidly growing Hadoop ecosystem that’s driving much of the big data sector.Why Windows?Until today’s announcement, Hadoop of any flavor typically ran on a Linux-based machine (physical or virtual). This made a lot of sense, since one of the big advantages of Hadoop is the capability to expand its data warehousing over any number of clustered computers. When those clustered machines are running Linux, it’s all but frictionless to add more, both in in terms of licensing cost (which is free) and configuration (which is easy).But when the underlying operating system is Windows Server, licensing – i.e., explicitly not free – would seem likely to create a lot more friction when someone tries to build a Hadoop cluster. Wouldn’t using Windows Server as the OS for a Hadoop system be too expensive?David McJannet, VP of marketing at Hortonworks, doesn’t seem to think so. McJannet’s concern was that too many Windows-based shops out there were shying away from Hadoop because they didn’t want to deal with adding Linux clusters and the related hassle of managing them. So assuaging those concerns was one big reason Microsoft has been working with Hortonworks over the past 18 months.The sheer number of Windows installations was also a major issue. McJannet said that a “majority of servers” were running Windows in the enterprise now. In its press release, Hortonworks cited IDC data thusly: “According to IDC, Windows Server owned 73 percent of the market in 2012 (IDC, Worldwide and Regional Server 2012–2016 Forecast, Doc # 234339, May 2012).”It is not clear just what server class this 73 percent represents, since the report itself costs $4,500, and is thus a little hard to access. File servers? Application servers? It’s sure not web servers, where according to Web analytics from Netcraft, Microsoft currently has 16.93% of the marketshare, dwarfed by Apache’s 55.26% marketshare.McJannet also said Hadoop on Windows would make data exploration easier. Using SQL-based queries that can now directly integrate with the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS), products like SQL Server and Excel can tap straight into Hadoop-stored data, enabling end-users to more easily navigate vast stores of data in Hadoop clusters.Embracing Open SourceThis is not Hortonworks’ first foray into Windows land. Late last year, it released the Windows Azure HDInsight product – essentially Hadoop for the Azure cloud platform.As odd as it may seem to see Hadoop on Windows Server, the move makes a lot of sense from Microsoft’s side. The company has needed a Big Data entry ever since it decided to drop its own Dryad data warehousing framework back in 2011. Some observers have expected this day ever since a year ago, when Microsoft announced it would build in tools within SQL Server to connect to Hadoop.McJannet emphasized that to date, Microsoft was playing well with others within the open source development model that Hadoop uses, so much of its innovation will cycle back to the rest of the Hadoop community.If so, you can expect to see more Hadoop vendors to announce their own connections to Windows in the near future.Image courtesy of Shutterstock 3 Areas of Your Business that Need Tech Now Massive Non-Desk Workforce is an Opportunity fo… Related Posts Tags:#Big Data#Hadoop#Microsoft center_img brian proffitt IT + Project Management: A Love Affair Cognitive Automation is the Immediate Future of…last_img read more

Separatists call for march against PM

first_imgSeparatists joint forum, Joint Resistance Leadership (JRL), comprising Syed Ali Geelani, Mirwaiz Umar Farooq and Yasin Malik, on Tuesday called for a protest march during Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s upcoming visit to J&K. “People should march towards the historic Lal Chowk on Saturday [May 19] to protest Mr. Modi’s visit,” said a JRL spokesman. Mr. Modi is visiting the State on Saturday and will inaugurate many development projects. The separatists also expressed anger over deaths in Palestine in Israeli action on Monday. “I lament the world’s indifference towards grave injustice and repression perpetuated upon Palestinians, thrown out of their own land by a powerful occupier. People of Kashmir sympathise and empathise with the Palestinian people,” said the Mirwaiz.Mr. Geelani asked the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation “to take stock of the situation and use its good offices on diplomatic front to deter the policy of genocide of the weaker nations of the world at the hands of imperialistic powers”.last_img read more

Video: Watch TCU RB Aaron Green Do LeBron James’ Powder Toss During A Snowstorm

first_imgAaron Green does LeBron-style powder toss with snow.It’s surprisingly snowing quite hard in Fort Worth, Texas, this afternoon. TCU running back Aaron Green is using the rare snowfall to channel one of his favorite athletes – LeBron James. Standing on the Horned Frogs’ campus, Green did the Cleveland Cavaliers’ star’s famed pre-game powder toss, using a snowball in place of the chalk. Check it out:  Well done, Aaron. TCU opens its season Sept. 3 against Minnesota in Minneapolis.last_img